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What are you reading?
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1.       libralady
5152 posts
 01 Jun 2008 Sun 11:36 pm

What book are you reading at the moment, who is the author and what made you want to read it and did you enjoy it?

My lastest read is:

Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Fiction

It is based at the time if the civil war in Nigeria in 1960 and how three lives intersect with one another. One is the house boy Ugwu, second in Olanna, who married the master of the house boy and the third is Richard the boyfriend of her sister. It is a bit slow to begin with, until you get to know the charactures then it becomes absorbing as the war breaks out and what some of us remember as Biafra is written about. The ending is abrupt and you want it to finish by telling you where all the charactures are, but you are left wondering.

I chose this book because I wanted to read something difference from my usual type of real life stories. The front cover also catches you eye and the reviews are good.

I enjoyed reading it, not the best book I have read, but all the same contains some very interesting description.

2.       thehandsom
7403 posts
 02 Jun 2008 Mon 01:54 am

I have just read 'sevdalim hayat -zulfu livaneli'.(it is turkish btw)
It is about his life, his memories.
It is a kind of book as soon as you start to read, you want to finish it.

The second book I am still reading is 'The God delusion-Richard Dawkins'

3.       Daydreamer
3743 posts
 02 Jun 2008 Mon 10:42 am

I've just finished Jodi Picoult 'Nineteen Minutes'. A wonderful read!

In the meantime, I keep reading websites with baby names...a tedious, dull and, above all, irritating read

4.       bod
5999 posts
 17 Jun 2008 Tue 08:16 pm

I am still trying - and mostly failing - to read some assorted Turkish children's book that I have.......

5.       teaschip
3870 posts
 17 Jun 2008 Tue 08:24 pm

I am sooooo excited. Just picked up the new "Fearless Fourteen" by Janet Evanovich...

6.       geniuda
1070 posts
 17 Jun 2008 Tue 08:41 pm

Quoting teaschip:

I am sooooo excited. Just picked up the new 'Fearless Fourteen' by Janet Evanovich...


nice, I thought about buying it but after reading a few customer reviews ...hmmmm yeah! I should give it a try on my own, but I am no longer too excited :-S

Fearless Fourteen-Customer Reviews

7.       teaschip
3870 posts
 17 Jun 2008 Tue 09:34 pm

Quoting geniuda:

Quoting teaschip:

I am sooooo excited. Just picked up the new 'Fearless Fourteen' by Janet Evanovich...


nice, I thought about buying it but after reading a few customer reviews ...hmmmm yeah! I should give it a try on my own, but I am no longer too excited :-S

Fearless Fourteen-Customer Reviews



I never listen to reviews..I have read all of her books and never have I been disappointed. I'll let you know in a couple days..I should have it completely read.

8.       lady in red
6947 posts
 17 Jun 2008 Tue 11:01 pm

Quoting teaschip:

Quoting geniuda:

Quoting teaschip:

I am sooooo excited. Just picked up the new 'Fearless Fourteen' by Janet Evanovich...


nice, I thought about buying it but after reading a few customer reviews ...hmmmm yeah! I should give it a try on my own, but I am no longer too excited :-S

Fearless Fourteen-Customer Reviews



I never listen to reviews..I have read all of her books and never have I been disappointed. I'll let you know in a couple days..I should have it completely read.



Who or what are Fearless Fourteen? Is this a popular series of books in the States?

I have just finished a book called 'Eye Contact' by Cammie McGovern about an autistic 9 year-old who is witness to the murder of one of his schoolfriends. I recommend it but have no idea where or when it was published as I picked up an advance proof-reader's copy at a book sale here in Turkey.

9.       Elisabeth
5732 posts
 18 Jun 2008 Wed 06:30 pm

The Stolen Child....Kevin Donohue. It is kind of a strange book but I can't seem to put it down. It is about a boy who is stolen by a changeling and how their lives intersect. It is oddly fascinating and quite a departure from my usual repertoire of historical fiction.

10.       yilgun-7
1326 posts
 18 Jun 2008 Wed 07:36 pm

Now I am reading these classic novels=

1-Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
2-Adolphe by Benjamin Constant
3-Victoria by Knut Hamsun
4-The Stranger by Albert Camus
5-White Nights by Dostoyevski
6-Yeşil Gece by Reşat Nuri Güntekin
7-Huzur by Ahmet Hamdi Tanpınar

11.       geniuda
1070 posts
 18 Jun 2008 Wed 09:05 pm

Quoting yilgun-7:

Now I am reading these classic novels=

1-Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
2-Adolphe by Benjamin Constant
3-Victoria by Knut Hamsun
4-The Stranger by Albert Camus
5-White Nights by Dostoyevski
6-Yeşil Gece by Reşat Nuri Güntekin
7-Huzur by Ahmet Hamdi Tanpınar


Wooow! I see you manage your time very well!!!!

Too many books to read at the same time. Now, I am embarrased...I dont think I could ever do that as I always read one book or novel at a time!

12.       yilgun-7
1326 posts
 18 Jun 2008 Wed 10:09 pm

Time planning

13.       libralady
5152 posts
 20 Jun 2008 Fri 12:28 am

I am now reading "The Tenderness of Wolves" by Steph Penny. It won the Costa Coffee book award in 2006 I think.

It is set in 1867 in the Canadian outback. The main charactures are migrants from Scotland and Norway to the Canada and it starts with a murder as all good books do.

The main charactures seventeen year old son dissappears and is hence accused of the murder. Different groups of people set out in search of the lad, all with their own reasons for wanting to find him.

The story is interwoven with many underlying themes, love, greed, inter-racial relationships and an unsolved previous town mystery.

It is easy to lose track of who everyone is to begin with, but you soon build empathy with some of them and distaste at others. But it is a good read, and had I not left the book at work today I would have finished it tonight! I guess it will have a pointnant ending although I cannot guess what it will be.

I would certainly recommend it!

14.       Avalon
381 posts
 20 Jun 2008 Fri 12:49 am

"Brida"by Paulo Coelho in my mother tongue together with "il retorno del profeta"in Italian by author called himself anonymous..from time to time i put them off to read Antonio Machado poems and "the Little Prince"the book i always get back....for tomorrow"The voice of knowledge"by Don Miguel Ruiz and "don Juan"by carlos castaneda are waiting....

15.       yilgun-7
1326 posts
 20 Jun 2008 Fri 01:16 am

I am interested in the novel "The Tenderness of Wolves" by Steph Penny.which was recommended by Libralady.

I could not find this book in the bookstores, Ankara, today.But I will try to get it.

16.       girleegirl
5065 posts
 20 Jun 2008 Fri 04:16 am

I just finished “The Other Boleyn Girl” by Phillipa Gregory.
Now I am reading “We Need to Talk About Kevin” by Lionel Shriver…..…..well I guess I should say I am trying to read it. I started it months ago and it is difficult to read. It is comprised of letters from a woman to her ex-husband, detailing their lives and what lead to their only son going on a shooting rampage at his high-school. It is gripping and well-written but very disturbing.
I just purchased “Sundays at Tiffany’s” by James Patterson….hoping that will be a little lighter fare...and after that I have “Reading Lolita in Teheran” by Azar Nafisi on tap.

17.       HomeSick
137 posts
 20 Jun 2008 Fri 04:23 am

I am listening Duma (Stephen King) instead of reading but since I do that at bed, no luck, everytime I press that little play button in my Creative Zen, I fall a sleep. I am afraid that if this continues to go like this, someday near soon I will wake up in the middle of the night and hear the end of the story

18.       lady in red
6947 posts
 20 Jun 2008 Fri 10:40 am

Quoting yilgun-7:

Now I am reading these classic novels=

1-Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
2-Adolphe by Benjamin Constant
3-Victoria by Knut Hamsun
4-The Stranger by Albert Camus
5-White Nights by Dostoyevski
6-Yeşil Gece by Reşat Nuri Güntekin
7-Huzur by Ahmet Hamdi Tanpınar

P.S.
Novel Century has ended in the classical meaning.I think there is no good novel in this time.
Classical Novel Time has gone away.
What do you think about this topic?



How could you POSSIBLY be reading all thes novels at the same time? Stop trying to show off.

19.       lady in red
6947 posts
 20 Jun 2008 Fri 10:45 am

Quoting girleegirl:

I just finished “The Other Boleyn Girl” by Phillipa Gregory.
Now I am reading “We Need to Talk About Kevin” by Lionel Shriver…..…..well I guess I should say I am trying to read it. I started it months ago and it is difficult to read. It is comprised of letters from a woman to her ex-husband, detailing their lives and what lead to their only son going on a shooting rampage at his high-school. It is gripping and well-written but very disturbing.
I just purchased “Sundays at Tiffany’s” by James Patterson….hoping that will be a little lighter fare...and after that I have “Reading Lolita in Teheran” by Azar Nafisi on tap.



I read 'We need to Talk About Kevin' last year gg - as you say, well-written but disturbing. Stick with it!

20.       teaschip
3870 posts
 20 Jun 2008 Fri 04:04 pm

Quoting lady in red:

Quoting teaschip:

Quoting geniuda:

Quoting teaschip:

I am sooooo excited. Just picked up the new 'Fearless Fourteen' by Janet Evanovich...


nice, I thought about buying it but after reading a few customer reviews ...hmmmm yeah! I should give it a try on my own, but I am no longer too excited :-S

Fearless Fourteen-Customer Reviews



I never listen to reviews..I have read all of her books and never have I been disappointed. I'll let you know in a couple days..I should have it completely read.



Who or what are Fearless Fourteen? Is this a popular series of books in the States?

I have just finished a book called 'Eye Contact' by Cammie McGovern about an autistic 9 year-old who is witness to the murder of one of his schoolfriends. I recommend it but have no idea where or when it was published as I picked up an advance proof-reader's copy at a book sale here in Turkey.



Yes, Janet Evanovich has a series of books starting with "One for the Money"...etc..The characters are so funny and you just can't wait to read the next book she comes out with. The same characters are in every book and I read that she based these characters off of people in her real life. Just finished Fearless Fourteen and I would say it was just ok..still they made me laugh and now I can't wait until book fifteen..

21.       lady in red
6947 posts
 20 Jun 2008 Fri 04:16 pm

Quoting teaschip:


Yes, Janet Evanovich has a series of books starting with "One for the Money"...etc..The characters are so funny and you just can't wait to read the next book she comes out with. The same characters are in every book and I read that she based these characters off of people in her real life. Just finished Fearless Fourteen and I would say it was just ok..still they made me laugh and now I can't wait until book fifteen..



Oh you've got me interested now! I must have a look on Amazon and see if I can order a copy - doubt very much I will find one here!

22.       girleegirl
5065 posts
 20 Jun 2008 Fri 04:19 pm

Quoting lady in red:


I read 'We need to Talk About Kevin' last year gg - as you say, well-written but disturbing. Stick with it!


I'm trying!!

23.       teaschip
3870 posts
 20 Jun 2008 Fri 04:40 pm

Quoting girleegirl:

Quoting lady in red:


I read 'We need to Talk About Kevin' last year gg - as you say, well-written but disturbing. Stick with it!


I'm trying!!



What is the book about?

24.       girleegirl
5065 posts
 21 Jun 2008 Sat 01:24 am

Quoting teaschip:

Quoting girleegirl:

Quoting lady in red:


I read 'We need to Talk About Kevin' last year gg - as you say, well-written but disturbing. Stick with it!


I'm trying!!



What is the book about?


It is comprised of letters from a woman to her ex-husband, detailing their lives and what lead to their only son going on a shooting rampage at his high-school.

25.       Leelu
1746 posts
 21 Jun 2008 Sat 03:45 am

knight of the black rose second in the ravenloft series. I just finished all of Nora Roberts books now I have wait for her new one to come out.

26.       yilgun-7
1326 posts
 21 Jun 2008 Sat 12:07 pm

For Leelu,
Nora Roberts is a famous novelist for Turkish readers.
I have just read her only one novel-its name is "THE VILLA" = (Bernardo Baptista, Sophie, Jeremy DeMorney, Evans,Tyler, teraza, Donata, Anthony, Marshall, Tony,Pilar, Gina, Giambelli family story)

27.       Deli_kizin
6376 posts
 21 Jun 2008 Sat 12:41 pm

I'm reading 'The Janissary Tree' by Jason Goodwin. It is about some murders of the modern soldiers of good families in İstanbul in 1836, which (probably, havent finished the book yet) are linked to the janissaries revolts a decade before (or smt). The sultan asks from Yashim the eunuch to solve the mysteries.

The reviews on the book were very positive, stating it has got all you may expect from a good novel, that it is really literature but reads like a detective, exotic, historical etc. It is a nice book to read, but I wouldnt have bought it on second thought. The sentences are short and simplistic and the writer, has a 'square' way of writing, whereas I prefer 'round' where sentences just flow from one to another. But it's a good book to read in the train or something.

28.       libralady
5152 posts
 21 Jun 2008 Sat 07:46 pm

Quoting Deli_kizin:

I'm reading 'The Janissary Tree' by Jason Goodwin. It is about some murders of the modern soldiers of good families in İstanbul in 1836, which (probably, havent finished the book yet) are linked to the janissaries revolts a decade before (or smt). The sultan asks from Yashim the eunuch to solve the mysteries.

The reviews on the book were very positive, stating it has got all you may expect from a good novel, that it is really literature but reads like a detective, exotic, historical etc. It is a nice book to read, but I wouldnt have bought it on second thought. The sentences are short and simplistic and the writer, has a 'square' way of writing, whereas I prefer 'round' where sentences just flow from one to another. But it's a good book to read in the train or something.



I liked the sound of this and just ordered it along with The Snake Stone from Amazon! Books for my holiday in 3 weeks time!

29.       Deli_kizin
6376 posts
 21 Jun 2008 Sat 08:18 pm

Quoting libralady:

I liked the sound of this and just ordered it along with The Snake Stone from Amazon! Books for my holiday in 3 weeks time!



Güle güle kullan(/oku)

30.       Leelu
1746 posts
 21 Jun 2008 Sat 09:05 pm

Quoting yilgun-7:

For Leelu,
Nora Roberts is a famous novelist for Turkish readers.
I have just read her only one novel-its name is "THE VILLA" = (Bernardo Baptista, Sophie, Jeremy DeMorney, Evans,Tyler, teraza, Donata, Anthony, Marshall, Tony,Pilar, Gina, Giambelli family story)


I just finished that book!!! what an awesome story. Have you read Angel Falls? that is another of her books!! I also like her series of books .. I have read all of them!!

31.       teaschip
3870 posts
 23 Jun 2008 Mon 05:39 pm

Quoting Leelu:

Quoting yilgun-7:

For Leelu,
Nora Roberts is a famous novelist for Turkish readers.
I have just read her only one novel-its name is "THE VILLA" = (Bernardo Baptista, Sophie, Jeremy DeMorney, Evans,Tyler, teraza, Donata, Anthony, Marshall, Tony,Pilar, Gina, Giambelli family story)


I just finished that book!!! what an awesome story. Have you read Angel Falls? that is another of her books!! I also like her series of books .. I have read all of them!!



I just finished reading The Hollow...excellent book. My favorite is the Garden Trilogy: Blue Dahia, Black Rose and Red Lily...She is coming out with a new book in July, "Tribute".

I'm now reading the Legacy series of Catherine Coulter.

32.       Leelu
1746 posts
 23 Jun 2008 Mon 05:43 pm

Quoting teaschip:

Quoting Leelu:

Quoting yilgun-7:

For Leelu,
Nora Roberts is a famous novelist for Turkish readers.
I have just read her only one novel-its name is "THE VILLA" = (Bernardo Baptista, Sophie, Jeremy DeMorney, Evans,Tyler, teraza, Donata, Anthony, Marshall, Tony,Pilar, Gina, Giambelli family story)


I just finished that book!!! what an awesome story. Have you read Angel Falls? that is another of her books!! I also like her series of books .. I have read all of them!!



I just finished reading The Hollow...excellent book. My favorite is the Garden Trilogy: Blue Dahia, Black Rose and Red Lily...She is coming out with a new book in July, "Tribute".

I'm now reading the Legacy series of Catherine Coulter.


Yes the garden trilogy was awesome!! have you read any of her irish trilogies? they are also great!!!

33.       teaschip
3870 posts
 23 Jun 2008 Mon 07:44 pm

Quoting Leelu:

Quoting teaschip:

Quoting Leelu:

Quoting yilgun-7:

For Leelu,
Nora Roberts is a famous novelist for Turkish readers.
I have just read her only one novel-its name is "THE VILLA" = (Bernardo Baptista, Sophie, Jeremy DeMorney, Evans,Tyler, teraza, Donata, Anthony, Marshall, Tony,Pilar, Gina, Giambelli family story)


I just finished that book!!! what an awesome story. Have you read Angel Falls? that is another of her books!! I also like her series of books .. I have read all of them!!



I just finished reading The Hollow...excellent book. My favorite is the Garden Trilogy: Blue Dahia, Black Rose and Red Lily...She is coming out with a new book in July, "Tribute".

I'm now reading the Legacy series of Catherine Coulter.


Yes the garden trilogy was awesome!! have you read any of her irish trilogies? they are also great!!!



No, but sounds interesting. I will look for them at half price books. Thanks....

Another favorite of mine is Mary Higgins Clark, Nicholas Sparks and Lou Ann Rice, great authors..

34.       Leelu
1746 posts
 24 Jun 2008 Tue 12:13 am

Have you read "Three Fates" or "Born in Ice/fire/shame" series? the Key series is also a great set. I cannot wait for her new one in July to come out. lol ..

35.       lady in red
6947 posts
 24 Jun 2008 Tue 12:27 am

Lisey's Story - Stephen King. ( I am so NOT an intellectual!! )

36.       Deli_kizin
6376 posts
 24 Jun 2008 Tue 01:03 am

Quoting lady in red:

I am so NOT an intellectual!!



There goes your image of social polish you can have my orange polish though, if you like. Not of much use anymore I'll go back to red, it was my favourite anyway

37.       lady in red
6947 posts
 24 Jun 2008 Tue 11:35 am

Quoting Deli_kizin:

Quoting lady in red:

I am so NOT an intellectual!!



There goes your image of social polish you can have my orange polish though, if you like. Not of much use anymore I'll go back to red, it was my favourite anyway



One can be socially polished and not intellectual you know! - several members of our Royal Family spring to mind here!

Thanks for the oje offer but I will stick to red too I think!!

38.       teaschip
3870 posts
 24 Jun 2008 Tue 08:08 pm

Quoting Leelu:

Have you read "Three Fates" or "Born in Ice/fire/shame" series? the Key series is also a great set. I cannot wait for her new one in July to come out. lol ..



No, I don't think I have..I have read the Key series though and thought they were great.

39.       yilgun-7
1326 posts
 04 Jul 2008 Fri 10:44 pm

I am reading now these two short novels=

1- White Nights (Белые ночи (1848), by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Nastenka Story in St.Petesburg

2- The First Teacher ("Первый учитель", 1962), by chingiz Aytmatov Cengiz Aymatov
Duyuşen Story

I advise you to read these beautiful novels.

40.       lady in red
6947 posts
 05 Jul 2008 Sat 02:07 am

Quoting yilgun-7:

I am reading now these two short novels=

1- White Nights (Белые ночи (1848), by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Nastenka Story in St.Petesburg

2- The First Teacher ("Первый учитель", 1962), by chingiz Aytmatov Cengiz Aymatov
Duyuşen Story

I advise you to read these beautiful novels.



I think you mean recommend

41.       yilgun-7
1326 posts
 05 Jul 2008 Sat 01:39 pm

Yes, thank you...
"I recommend you to read those beautiful novels..."

42.       silversong
278 posts
 20 Jul 2008 Sun 06:40 pm

I have just finished Reading the kite runner by khaled hosseini
its about 2 boys growing up in afghanistan, I saw the movie first and it was a very good interperpation of the book, a very moving story. Now I am Reading his next novel A Thousand Splendid Suns. Its about the friendship that develops between two women growing up and living in afghanistan, I´m half way through it and think I need another box of tissues. Its just as heart-wrenching as his first novel.

43.       libralady
5152 posts
 20 Jul 2008 Sun 07:10 pm

Quoting silversong:

I have just finished Reading the kite runner by khaled hosseini
its about 2 boys growing up in aghanistan, I saw the movie first and it was a very good interperpation of the book, a very moving story. Now I am Reading his next novel A Thousand Splendid Suns. Its about the friendship that develops between two women growing up and living in afganistan, I´m half way through it and think I need another box of tissues. Its just as heart-wrenching as his first novel.



I have these sitting in the wings, right now I am "trying" to read The Jannisary Tree but it is a bit like wading through mud - hopefully it will pick up. Fully intended to read it on holiday but the opportunity slipped me by

44.       silversong
278 posts
 20 Jul 2008 Sun 07:22 pm

Quoting libralady:

Quoting silversong:

I have just finished Reading the kite runner by khaled hosseini
its about 2 boys growing up in aghanistan, I saw the movie first and it was a very good interperpation of the book, a very moving story. Now I am Reading his next novel A Thousand Splendid Suns. Its about the friendship that develops between two women growing up and living in afganistan, I´m half way through it and think I need another box of tissues. Its just as heart-wrenching as his first novel.



I have these sitting in the wings, right now I am "trying" to read The Jannisary Tree but it is a bit like wading through mud - hopefully it will pick up. Fully intended to read it on holiday but the opportunity slipped me by



I can highly recommend his two novels, and if your like me you won´t be able to put them down. And have some tissues handy

45.       catwoman
8933 posts
 21 Jul 2008 Mon 03:54 am

I am reading lots of texbooks right now... but I have some books that I want to read:
Parecon: Life after Capitalism (Michael Albert)
Men Speak Out: Views on Gender, Sex and Power (Shira Tarrant)
Beauty and Misogyny: Harmful cultural practices in the West (Sheila Jeffreys)
Hegemony or Survival: America´s quest for Global Dominance (Noam Chomsky)
Not for Sale: Feminists resisting prostitution and pornography (C. Stark, R. Whisnant)...
and many more

46.       catwoman
8933 posts
 21 Jul 2008 Mon 04:06 am

Quoting silversong:

I have just finished Reading the kite runner by khaled hosseini
its about 2 boys growing up in afghanistan, I saw the movie first and it was a very good interperpation of the book, a very moving story. Now I am Reading his next novel A Thousand Splendid Suns. Its about the friendship that develops between two women growing up and living in afghanistan, I´m half way through it and think I need another box of tissues. Its just as heart-wrenching as his first novel.


This does sound interesting...

47.       silversong
278 posts
 21 Jul 2008 Mon 04:52 am

Quoting catwoman:

Quoting silversong:

I have just finished Reading the kite runner by khaled hosseini
its about 2 boys growing up in afghanistan, I saw the movie first and it was a very good interperpation of the book, a very moving story. Now I am Reading his next novel A Thousand Splendid Suns. Its about the friendship that develops between two women growing up and living in afghanistan, I´m half way through it and think I need another box of tissues. Its just as heart-wrenching as his first novel.


This does sound interesting...



I think you would enjoy them cat
Dont want to give too much of the story away but the second one is about a young girl aged 15 living in Herat who is sent off to kabul to marry a man in his 40´s
the story tells of the next 20 years of her life, how it changes with the Russian invasion, the retreat of the Russians, the fighting between warlordsand the take over by the taliban. And how a friendship she makes with another afghan girl/woman changes both of their lives
a very sad but moving story
hope you find time to read them both

48.       silversong
278 posts
 21 Jul 2008 Mon 06:32 am

Quoting girleegirl:

I just finished “The Other Boleyn Girl” by Phillipa Gregory.
Now I am reading “We Need to Talk About Kevin” by Lionel Shriver…..…..well I guess I should say I am trying to read it. I started it months ago and it is difficult to read. It is comprised of letters from a woman to her ex-husband, detailing their lives and what lead to their only son going on a shooting rampage at his high-school. It is gripping and well-written but very disturbing.
I just purchased “Sundays at Tiffany’s” by James Patterson….hoping that will be a little lighter fare...and after that I have “Reading Lolita in Teheran” by Azar Nafisi on tap.



I was thinking about ´reading Lolita in Tehran´ next has anyone read it?
would you recommend it?

49.       girleegirl
5065 posts
 21 Jul 2008 Mon 06:43 am

Quoting silversong:


I was thinking about ´reading Lolita in Tehran´ next has anyone read it?
would you recommend it?


I just finished another book and will be starting "Lolita" this week. I´ll let you know what I think when I finish it.

50.       catwoman
8933 posts
 21 Jul 2008 Mon 08:10 am

Quoting silversong:

I think you would enjoy them cat
Dont want to give too much of the story away but the second one is about a young girl aged 15 living in Herat who is sent off to kabul to marry a man in his 40´s
the story tells of the next 20 years of her life, how it changes with the Russian invasion, the retreat of the Russians, the fighting between warlordsand the take over by the taliban. And how a friendship she makes with another afghan girl/woman changes both of their lives
a very sad but moving story
hope you find time to read them both


You know how to get my attention, offff...!! I added both of these books to my ´reading list´ Thank you, they sound fascinating.

I do recommend Ayaan Hirsi Ali´s "Infidel" as well... you won´t want to put it away.

51.       peacetrain
1905 posts
 21 Jul 2008 Mon 09:35 am

Quoting silversong:

I have just finished Reading the kite runner by khaled hosseini
its about 2 boys growing up in afghanistan, I saw the movie first and it was a very good interperpation of the book, a very moving story. Now I am Reading his next novel A Thousand Splendid Suns. Its about the friendship that develops between two women growing up and living in afghanistan, I´m half way through it and think I need another box of tissues. Its just as heart-wrenching as his first novel.



I bought the second one a couple of weeks ago. I plan to read it during my travels this summer. I´ve packed the tissues too

52.       silversong
278 posts
 21 Jul 2008 Mon 10:38 am

Quoting peacetrain:

Quoting silversong:

I have just finished Reading the kite runner by khaled hosseini
its about 2 boys growing up in afghanistan, I saw the movie first and it was a very good interperpation of the book, a very moving story. Now I am Reading his next novel A Thousand Splendid Suns. Its about the friendship that develops between two women growing up and living in afghanistan, I´m half way through it and think I need another box of tissues. Its just as heart-wrenching as his first novel.



I bought the second one a couple of weeks ago. I plan to read it during my travels this summer. I´ve packed the tissues to



Did you read his first one?

I finished a thousand splendid suns in two days, I couldnt put it down
hope you enjoy it

53.       peacetrain
1905 posts
 21 Jul 2008 Mon 03:11 pm

No I haven´t but I may if I enjoy this one.

54.       libralady
5152 posts
 06 Aug 2008 Wed 10:54 pm

Quoting libralady:

Quoting silversong:

I have just finished Reading the kite runner by khaled hosseini
its about 2 boys growing up in aghanistan, I saw the movie first and it was a very good interperpation of the book, a very moving story. Now I am Reading his next novel A Thousand Splendid Suns. Its about the friendship that develops between two women growing up and living in afganistan, I´m half way through it and think I need another box of tissues. Its just as heart-wrenching as his first novel.



I have these sitting in the wings, right now I am "trying" to read The Jannisary Tree but it is a bit like wading through mud - hopefully it will pick up. Fully intended to read it on holiday but the opportunity slipped me by



Thankfully the The Janissary Tree picked up and ended up an entertaining murder mystery, with the main characture being the Eunoch Yasim, who somehow managed to have sex with the Russian Ambassadors wife! Assumably he was not castrated as a child!

55.       libralady
5152 posts
 06 Aug 2008 Wed 10:57 pm

I started reading "The Kite Runner" at the weekend and I have nearly finished it today.

I was reading it on the train this morning and I had tears in my eyes and again tonight. It is a long time since I read a book that is so moving and I can´t wait to read The Thousand Splendid Suns.

56.       girleegirl
5065 posts
 06 Aug 2008 Wed 11:03 pm

Quoting girleegirl:

Quoting silversong:


I was thinking about ´reading Lolita in Tehran´ next has anyone read it?
would you recommend it?


I just finished another book and will be starting "Lolita" this week. I´ll let you know what I think when I finish it.


I have lost my copy of "Lolita". I was a few chapters in and went away for a weekend and now I can´t find it anywhere!!!
I will have to get another copy and start over.

57.       Elisabeth
5732 posts
 06 Aug 2008 Wed 11:12 pm

Quoting girleegirl:

Quoting girleegirl:

Quoting silversong:


I was thinking about ´reading Lolita in Tehran´ next has anyone read it?
would you recommend it?


I just finished another book and will be starting "Lolita" this week. I´ll let you know what I think when I finish it.


I have lost my copy of "Lolita". I was a few chapters in and went away for a weekend and now I can´t find it anywhere!!!
I will have to get another copy and start over.



Reading Lolita in Tehran is an excellent memoir, however, if you are not a big fan of literature it may be a bit boring. She talks at great lengths about classics like The Great Gatsby, and how they relate to her situation in revolutionary Iran. It is a facinating window into what it was like in Iran during that time.

58.       parisisbeautifu
160 posts
 08 Aug 2008 Fri 06:48 am

I, too, have just finished reading ´A Thousand Splendid Suns´. And after I finish those few books on my To-read list, I will be on Kite Runner! After ´A Thousand Splendid Suns´, I´m not reading ´Light on Snow´ by Anita Shreve. Next in line is ´Nobody´s Child´ by Michael Seed with Noel Botham. And ´The Choice´ by Nicholas Sparks. And then Kite Runner!

59.       gezbelle
1542 posts
 08 Aug 2008 Fri 07:17 am

i´ve just finished reading "the kite runner". amazing book. i have "a thousand splendid suns" lined up to read.

but right now, i am reading "in turkey i am beautiful" by brendan shanahan, and "blackwood farm" by anne rice (which i have been reading forever, but haven´t been able to get into yet).

60.       parisisbeautifu
160 posts
 08 Aug 2008 Fri 07:35 am

Yeah! I think A thousand Splendid Suns & Kite Runner are two very very popular books in recent times!

teaschip! I have been reading Mary Higgins Clark since young. And nicholas sparks is one of my favourite too! Along with Stuart Woods!

61.       Trudy
7887 posts
 08 Aug 2008 Fri 09:50 am

The last three weeks I read or re-read 10 thrillers of Barbara Nadel that all take place in Istanbul, absolutely recommendable. Now I´m reading a thriller by David Morell, about CIA/MI5/KGB/Mossad hitmen.

62.       parisisbeautifu
160 posts
 11 Aug 2008 Mon 06:49 am

I´m currently reading Nobody´s Child and I cannot imagine how sad a boy´s life can get. The saddest of it is that this is actually a true story...

63.       CANLI
5084 posts
 15 Aug 2008 Fri 03:15 am

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

İ just love this one

64.       MarioninTurkey
6124 posts
 15 Aug 2008 Fri 09:22 am

Just finished A Chemical Prison by Barbara Nadel - the book I´m reviewing for Sunday´s Zaman this week.

 

I love her detective novels set in Istanbul.

65.       Trudy
7887 posts
 15 Aug 2008 Fri 10:12 am

 

Quoting MarioninTurkey

Just finished A Chemical Prison by Barbara Nadel - the book I´m reviewing for Sunday´s Zaman this week.

 

I love her detective novels set in Istanbul.

 

 Have you read her latest already, Marion? ´A passion for killing´? About a serial killer targeting gay men in the streets of Istanbul. A very good book!

66.       MarioninTurkey
6124 posts
 15 Aug 2008 Fri 11:34 am

 

Quoting Trudy

 Have you read her latest already, Marion? ´A passion for killing´? About a serial killer targeting gay men in the streets of Istanbul. A very good book!

 

 Theres a brand new one out this week!

 

Pretty Dead Things.

 

Here is the publishers blurb:

 

When Emine Aksu, the flamboyant wife of an Istanbul style guru, suddenly goes missing, Inspector Cetin Ikmen´s investigation leads him deep into her strange and colourful past.Emine was a hippie when she was younger, who wholeheartedly enjoyed the liberated lifestyle that swept across Istanbul in the sixties. Her husband suspects that she was visiting an old friend at the time of her disappearance. Meanwhile, Inspector Mehmet Suleyman is called to a terrifying scene at the art deco Kamondo Stairs in the old banking district of Karakoy. The skeleton of a woman has been discovered in one of the large plant containers. Could these two bizarre incidents be linked?

67.       Trudy
7887 posts
 15 Aug 2008 Fri 11:39 am

 

Quoting MarioninTurkey

 Theres a brand new one out this week!

 

Pretty Dead Things.

 

Here is the publishers blurb:

 

When Emine Aksu, the flamboyant wife of an Istanbul style guru, suddenly goes missing, Inspector Cetin Ikmen´s investigation leads him deep into her strange and colourful past.Emine was a hippie when she was younger, who wholeheartedly enjoyed the liberated lifestyle that swept across Istanbul in the sixties. Her husband suspects that she was visiting an old friend at the time of her disappearance. Meanwhile, Inspector Mehmet Suleyman is called to a terrifying scene at the art deco Kamondo Stairs in the old banking district of Karakoy. The skeleton of a woman has been discovered in one of the large plant containers. Could these two bizarre incidents be linked?

 

 Thanks! It´s on my to-buy-list!

68.       MarioninTurkey
6124 posts
 17 Aug 2008 Sun 11:56 am

 

Quoting MarioninTurkey

Just finished A Chemical Prison by Barbara Nadel - the book I´m reviewing for Sunday´s Zaman this week.

 

I love her detective novels set in Istanbul.

 

 Link to the review if you´re curious:

 

http://www.sundayszaman.com/sunday/detaylar.do?load=detay&link=150401

 

69.       MarioninTurkey
6124 posts
 17 Aug 2008 Sun 11:57 am

Currently reading Orhan Pamuk´s Snow for next week´s review.

 

Now, I am a great hater of Pamuk´s other works, but I really like this one!  I´m on page 350 out of 425 or so....

70.       Trudy
7887 posts
 17 Aug 2008 Sun 12:00 pm

Reading ´Turkish butterflies´ (Turkse vlinders), a Dutch novel about a love that didn´t last but also gives lots of inside information.

71.       Delidolu
344 posts
 18 Aug 2008 Mon 12:40 pm

I am reading Pullman´s trilogy-His Dark Materials:Nortern Lights,The Subtle Knife and The Amber Telescope..Cool books-science fiction and a lil epic like Tolkien´s (though i admite NO ONE can reach Tolkien´s maestri)..It´s like fairy tails for grown ups!!!

72.       libralady
5152 posts
 29 Aug 2008 Fri 12:09 am

Just read the "Kite Runner" and "A Thousand Splendid Suns" back to back.  What brilliant books to read, albeit with tears in my eyes, especially the Kite Runner, which I found the far more emotional book.  I think the Thousand Splendid Suns is a little more predictable which takes the sting out of the emotional bits.

 

Now in search of something new to read.

73.       Trudy
7887 posts
 29 Aug 2008 Fri 12:20 am

 

Quoting libralady

Just read the "Kite Runner" and "A Thousand Splendid Suns" back to back.  What brilliant books to read, albeit with tears in my eyes, especially the Kite Runner, which I found the far more emotional book.  I think the Thousand Splendid Suns is a little more predictable which takes the sting out of the emotional bits.

 

Now in search of something new to read.

 

 I found it opposite: A Thousand Spledid Suns ´did´ more to me emotionally.

 

You could try books of Kader Abdolah, an Iranian refugee who writes now in Dutch (but some books are translated in English). His latest is called ´The Koran, a translation´ and ´The Messenger - about prophet Muhammed´s life´. I have read several books of this author and I like them very much.

74.       catwoman
8933 posts
 09 Sep 2008 Tue 04:59 pm

I just finished reading "Feminist Theory: from margin to center" by Bell Hooks. I highly recommend this book and especially the author, Bell Hooks is one of my most favorite feminists. Her writing is truly revolutionary - she is challenging a lot of feminist ideas and substituting them with very honest and brilliant thinking. Marvellous book, do check her out.

75.       MarioninTurkey
6124 posts
 09 Sep 2008 Tue 07:16 pm

For my review this week I just read Honour Killings by Ayşe Önal. A wonderful, if harrowing book, about the tragic practice of killing a woman deemed to have damaged the family´s honour.  Ayşe interviewed a number of men in prison for this crime to try to understand what made them do it.  The result is an amazing study, and very very very moving tales of the tragically short lives of some Turkish women.

76.       zhang ziyi
205 posts
 09 Sep 2008 Tue 08:23 pm

In Turkish or English?

Quoting MarioninTurkey

For my review this week I just read Honour Killings by Ayşe Önal. A wonderful, if harrowing book, about the tragic practice of killing a woman deemed to have damaged the family´s honour.  Ayşe interviewed a number of men in prison for this crime to try to understand what made them do it.  The result is an amazing study, and very very very moving tales of the tragically short lives of some Turkish women.

 

 

77.       catwoman
8933 posts
 09 Sep 2008 Tue 08:29 pm

 

Quoting zhang ziyi

In Turkish or English?

 

Looks like there is an English version of this book: Honor Killings, Ayse Onal

78.       Trudy
7887 posts
 12 Sep 2008 Fri 05:12 pm

Currently reading: Madam President´s choice by Anne Holt

 

Short review from some booksite:

 

The newly-elected American president visits Oslo for their national drinking holiday on May 17 and gets herself kidnapped. You read that right, and no it is not Hillary, ´cause this president met Hillary and got some advice from her: Trust no one but your husband, and only him if he is still with you.

The book has some interesting explanations of how left-out Americans feel, and describes a great plot to destroy America from the inside. No, not hijack any planes. Just deprive them of gasoline, TV and shopping malls, and they´ll overthrow the government of their own accord.

 

***********

 

I´m halfway now and I must say I love it!

Sorry, no ISBN or publisher known as I´m reading it in Dutch.

79.       eiddie
169 posts
 12 Sep 2008 Fri 06:45 pm

The Majority Rules - Eugene Sullivan

 

Present day story about a lawyer discovering corruption at its peak.

While on his way to a judicial appointment, he´s faced with ´going along´

or a for a chance to make a difference.....

 

Also ´The Shack´ - William Young

 

Present day story about a man/wife who lost their little 6 year old

daughter to kidnap and possibly murder. MacKenzie, the girl´s father, receives

an invitation to dinner by someone named ´Papa´ in a letter. 

Only, the dinner is to be at ´ The Shack ´...the name his wife gave to the

place they found Missy´s last remnants.....

 

Both excellent books...

 

:  >

 

80.       lady in red
6947 posts
 13 Sep 2008 Sat 07:57 pm

 

Quoting libralady

Just read the "Kite Runner" and "A Thousand Splendid Suns" back to back.

 

Just started ´A Thousand Splendid Suns´ - I think I´m going to enjoy it.

81.       Deli_kizin
6376 posts
 13 Sep 2008 Sat 11:19 pm

 

Quoting Trudy

Reading ´Turkish butterflies´ (Turkse vlinders), a Dutch novel about a love that didn´t last but also gives lots of inside information.

 

 I was kinda dissapointed by that book. It is a bit superficial and soap-like, though it provides some interesting insights on Turkish men and relationships with them, especially because it is a ´true´ story. I remember when she was going to sleep with the guy the first time, and he didnt want to use a condom ´because Allah would protect him from aids/pregnancy´ (not sure which one!) lol

 

They are going to make a documentary about that book. I met the writer to talk about me and Kadir, but I dont think they can ´use us´ because we dont have a relationship that is filled with the regular prejudice about these kind of relationships lol

82.       Deli_kizin
6376 posts
 13 Sep 2008 Sat 11:22 pm

Orhan Pamuk - Masumiyet Müzesi

 

Pamuk´s latest novel, ´The Innocence Museum´. Guess it will be translated to English soon!

 

I have read the first 40 pages now, and so far it seems to me as one of those books that you skip your nights rest for

83.       Trudy
7887 posts
 13 Sep 2008 Sat 11:25 pm

 

Quoting Deli_kizin

Orhan Pamuk - Masumiyet Müzesi

 

Pamuk´s latest novel, ´The Innocence Museum´. Guess it will be translated to English soon!

 

I have read the first 40 pages now, and so far it seems to me as one of those books that you skip your nights rest for

 

I´m still - after 2 years - halfway Snow, I gave away my copy of Istanbul and now for weeks The Black Book is waiting. His style is.... hmm, not my favorite.

84.       Deli_kizin
6376 posts
 13 Sep 2008 Sat 11:50 pm

 

Quoting Trudy

I´m still - after 2 years - halfway Snow, I gave away my copy of Istanbul and now for weeks The Black Book is waiting. His style is.... hmm, not my favorite.

 

 Well you definitely picked the 2 wrong books to start reading Orhan Pamuk.. İstanbul is very veyr different from the other books, also the style. Though I loved that book, with all its details, it wasnt as (meeslepend?) impressive as the other ones, and Snow is his first and last political novel, with a harder style.

 

Black Book on the other hand, is really good and ´reads as a train´ (), I can also recommend the White Castle.

85.       MarioninTurkey
6124 posts
 14 Sep 2008 Sun 09:03 am

 

Quoting Deli_kizin

 Well you definitely picked the 2 wrong books to start reading Orhan Pamuk.. İstanbul is very veyr different from the other books, also the style. Though I loved that book, with all its details, it wasnt as (meeslepend?) impressive as the other ones, and Snow is his first and last political novel, with a harder style.

 

Black Book on the other hand, is really good and ´reads as a train´ (), I can also recommend the White Castle.

 

 Agree.  the only one I actually enjoyed reading was the White Castle.

86.       tamikidakika
1346 posts
 14 Sep 2008 Sun 11:29 am

 

Quoting MarioninTurkey

Agree. the only one I actually enjoyed reading was the White Castle.

 

I`ve read half way through the black book, I will finish it up when I have time. His writing style is tasteless to say the least. I think this guy thinks writing long sentences makes him look more intellectual.

 

87.       lady in red
6947 posts
 19 Sep 2008 Fri 11:52 am

Mayada, Daughter of Iraq - Jean Sasson - the story of a woman´s survival in Iraq.

 

- not sure about this one, despite the subject ´One Woman´s Survival in Saddam Hussein´s Torture Jail´ - I don´t think its particularly well-written and the writing style is a bit ´girly´ for my taste.

88.       libralady
5152 posts
 19 Sep 2008 Fri 03:22 pm

The Long Way Down, by Ewan McGregor (of Trainspotting and Star Wars fame)  and Charlie Borman.

 

These intrepid travellers decided to travel around the world on motor bikes about three years ago, along came book and film etc etc.

 

This was so successful they devided to ride the Long Way Down, from John O´Groats (Northern tip of Scotland) to Cape Town South Africa.

 

The support Unicef and visit unicef run projects on their way.

 

It is a good read, written as they are both speaking, i.e. taking it in turns, and you get a different perspective on one situation.

 

I would highly recommend this book and the Long Way Round - any motorcycle enthusiasts would love the adventure!

89.       yilgun-7
1326 posts
 20 Sep 2008 Sat 02:14 am

Masumiyet Müzesi (The Innocence Museum) by Orhan Pamuk, a novel.

2008 September, İletişim Yayınları, 592 pages.

 

90.       yilgun-7
1326 posts
 20 Sep 2008 Sat 02:52 am

Is there a friend who has read these novels?

 

1-"The Dark Side"   by Jane Mayer  (USA)

2-"The Obama Nation "  by Jerome and Corsi (USA)

3-"The Post-American World "  by fareed Zakaria (USA)

4-" In the dark "  by Mark Bilingham (UK)

5-"The return " by Victoria Hislop (UK)

6- "Someone special " by Sheila O´ flanagan (UK)

7--"When Will There be Good News? " by Kate Atkinson (UK)

8--"Angel Uncovered " by Katie Price (UK)

9-"Le fait du prince" by Amelia Nothomb (France)

10-"Ce que le jour doit a la nuit" by Yasmina Khadra (France)

 

91.       libralady
5152 posts
 20 Sep 2008 Sat 01:17 pm

 

Quoting yilgun-7

Is there a friend who has read these novels?

 

1-"The Dark Side"   by Jane Mayer  (USA)

2-"The Obama Nation "  by Jerome and Corsi (USA)

3-"The Post-American World "  by fareed Zakaria (USA)

4-" In the dark "  by Mark Bilingham (UK)

5-"The return " by Victoria Hislop (UK)

6- "Someone special " by Sheila O´ flanagan (UK)

7--"When Will There be Good News? " by Kate Atkinson (UK)

8--"Angel Uncovered " by Katie Price (UK)

9-"Le fait du prince" by Amelia Nothomb (France)

10-"Ce que le jour doit a la nuit" by Yasmina Khadra (France)

 

 No, none of these are on my shelf.  For info Yilgin, Katie Price is otherwise known as Jordon, a glamour model in the UK,  and for one I would not buy any of her books.

 

Victoria Hislop is an aclaimed writer in the UK, married to the satorial journalist Ian Hislop.  The other UK writers I have not heard of.

92.       peacetrain
1905 posts
 20 Sep 2008 Sat 02:27 pm

An e-mail someone sent to me.  It contained this story:

 

"Moral of the story is too Good...................................

 

A giant ship engine failed. The ship´s owners tried one expert after another, but none of them could figure but how to fix the engine. Then they brought in an old man who had been fixing ships since he was a young. He carried a large bag of tools with him, and when he arrived, he immediately went to work. He inspected the engine very carefully, top to bottom. Two of the ship´s owners were there, watching this man, hoping he would know what to do. After looking things over, the old man reached into his bag and pulled out a small hammer. He gently tapped something. Instantly, the engine lurched into life. He carefully put his hammer away. The engine was fixed! A week later, the owners received a bill from the old man for ten thousand dollars. ´What?!´ the owners exclaimed. ´He hardly did anything!´ So they wrote the old man a note saying, ´Please send us an itemized bill.´ The man sent a bill that read: Tapping with a hammer...... ......... ........ $ 2.00
Knowing where to tap.......... ......... ...... $ 9,998.00
 

Effort is important, but knowing where to make an effort makes all the difference  "

93.       libralady
5152 posts
 20 Sep 2008 Sat 06:04 pm

 

Quoting peacetrain

An e-mail someone sent to me.  It contained this story:

 

"Moral of the story is too Good...................................

 

A giant ship engine failed. The ship´s owners tried one expert after another, but none of them could figure but how to fix the engine. Then they brought in an old man who had been fixing ships since he was a young. He carried a large bag of tools with him, and when he arrived, he immediately went to work. He inspected the engine very carefully, top to bottom. Two of the ship´s owners were there, watching this man, hoping he would know what to do. After looking things over, the old man reached into his bag and pulled out a small hammer. He gently tapped something. Instantly, the engine lurched into life. He carefully put his hammer away. The engine was fixed! A week later, the owners received a bill from the old man for ten thousand dollars. ´What?!´ the owners exclaimed. ´He hardly did anything!´ So they wrote the old man a note saying, ´Please send us an itemized bill.´ The man sent a bill that read: Tapping with a hammer...... ......... ........ $ 2.00
Knowing where to tap.......... ......... ...... $ 9,998.00
 

Effort is important, but knowing where to make an effort makes all the difference  "

 

 

Puzzled {#lang_emotions_unsure}

 

94.       yilgun-7
1326 posts
 22 Sep 2008 Mon 09:19 pm

I am very much interested in Paul Auster (An American novelist) ´  novels.

Have you seen his new novel named "KARANLIKTAKİ ADAM= " THE MAN IN THE DARK " )  in your country (USA, England, etc)´s book stores in English?

95.       SuiGeneris
3922 posts
 22 Sep 2008 Mon 09:27 pm

Soner Yalçın - Siz Kimi Kandırıyorsunuz

96.       Trudy
7887 posts
 22 Sep 2008 Mon 09:29 pm

Re-reading Judge Ooka stories, Japanese tales about a 18th century philosophical Japanese judge. Very nice, great plots and answers to court cases.

97.       yilgun-7
1326 posts
 05 Oct 2008 Sun 10:20 pm

1-Politika ( Politics)  by  Aristoteles

2-Devlet (The State) by Platon (Eflatun)

 

98.       lady in red
6947 posts
 05 Oct 2008 Sun 10:39 pm

 

Quoting libralady

 No, none of these are on my shelf.  For info Yilgin, Katie Price is otherwise known as Jordon, a glamour model in the UK,  and for one I would not buy any of her books.

 

Victoria Hislop is an aclaimed writer in the UK, married to the satorial journalist Ian Hislop.  The other UK writers I have not heard of.

 

Were you on the G&Ts again LL!! lol - I think you meant satirical journalist!  And I´m sure Yilgun would really enjoy Mrs Andre´s latest offering!! {#lang_emotions_laugh_at}

99.       lady in red
6947 posts
 05 Oct 2008 Sun 10:54 pm

I am currently reading ´Size 14 is not fat either´ by Meg Cabot

 

(It´s very funny!)

100.       libralady
5152 posts
 05 Oct 2008 Sun 11:15 pm

 

Quoting libralady

The Long Way Down, by Ewan McGregor (of Trainspotting and Star Wars fame)  and Charlie Borman.

 

These intrepid travellers decided to travel around the world on motor bikes about three years ago, along came book and film etc etc.

 

This was so successful they devided to ride the Long Way Down, from John O´Groats (Northern tip of Scotland) to Cape Town South Africa.

 

The support Unicef and visit unicef run projects on their way.

 

It is a good read, written as they are both speaking, i.e. taking it in turns, and you get a different perspective on one situation.

 

I would highly recommend this book and the Long Way Round - any motorcycle enthusiasts would love the adventure!

 

Just finished the Long Way Down and I must say, not a patch on Long Way Round.  Not such an interesting journey I felt and one African country sounded very much like the next one.  Really skipped the journey through Namibia to South Africa in a few pages.

 

So I am now beginning the latest Joh Le Carre book, "A most Wanted Man".  A spy book about a Russian Muslim, so it says in the front cover........................... it begins:

 

A Turkish heavy weight boxing champion sauntering down a Hamburg Street with his mother on his arm can scarcely  be blammed for failing to notice that he is being shadowed by a skinny boy in a black coat..........................

 

101.       maisie
31 posts
 06 Oct 2008 Mon 03:01 pm

´Dinner of Herbs´ by Carla Grissmann  -  a travelogue of autobiographical experiences in remote Anatolia in the 1960´s - fascinating and informative read{#lang_emotions_bigsmile}

102.       eiddie
169 posts
 07 Oct 2008 Tue 09:32 pm

Two O´clock Eastern Wartime - John Dunning

 

Tale of an outcast novelist writing scripts for a Radio Station in 1942 New Jersey, 

looking for a radio actor friend of his, at the same time hoping to hook up with 

the lost love of his life who now sings in clubs.

 

:  >

103.       peacetrain
1905 posts
 23 Nov 2008 Sun 11:17 am

Getting Lost: Mishaps of an Accidental Nomad   by    Dave  Fox

 

104.       Trudy
7887 posts
 23 Nov 2008 Sun 11:20 am

Tony Wheeler´s Bad Lands (founder of the Lonely Planet) - about ´evil´ countries. Guess which is number one on his list? (No, of course not Turkey!)

105.       TheAenigma
5001 posts
 23 Nov 2008 Sun 12:27 pm

 {#lang_emotions_laugh_at}

Quoting peacetrain

Getting Lost:

 

 

106.       TheAenigma
5001 posts
 23 Nov 2008 Sun 12:28 pm

 

Quoting Trudy

Tony Wheeler´s Bad Lands (founder of the Lonely Planet) - about ´evil´ countries. Guess which is number one on his list? (No, of course not Turkey!)

 

Evil Britain?

Evil Amerika?

 

(By the way, I think you spelled it wrong, it should be "Bed Lands" )

107.       Trudy
7887 posts
 23 Nov 2008 Sun 12:50 pm

 

Quoting TheAenigma

Evil Britain?

Evil Amerika?

 

(By the way, I think you spelled it wrong, it should be "Bed Lands" )

 

 Amerika is mentioned in a way, but not in the top-10. About Britain, I think Tony forgot that....

 

PS. Sory vor my bet speling.... lol

108.       lady in red
6947 posts
 23 Nov 2008 Sun 12:51 pm

Gardens of Water by Alan Drew. 

 

Quote: ´A powerful story of survival and love ´Gardens of Water´ follows the seismic shocks that reverberate through two families in the aftermath of Turkey´s devastating earthquake of 1999´

109.       alameda
3499 posts
 23 Nov 2008 Sun 07:40 pm

Right now I´m reading two books, Bernal Diaz, Historian of the Conquest by Herbert Cerwin, and The Life and Death of Gandhi by Robert Payne.

110.       vineyards
1954 posts
 23 Nov 2008 Sun 10:21 pm

Chlorine Derivatives of Syndiotactic Polybutadiene

By M. I. Abdullin, A. B. Glazyrin, R. N. Asfandiyarov, V. R. Akhmetova and V. N. Zaboristov

111.       TheAenigma
5001 posts
 23 Nov 2008 Sun 10:24 pm

 

Quoting vineyards

Chlorine Derivatives of Syndiotactic 1,2-polybutadiene

By M. I. Abdullin, A. B. Glazyrin, R. N. Asfandiyarov1, V. R. Akhmetova and V. N. Zaboristov

 

 Hehehe just a bit of "light reading" then eh Vineyards

112.       cedars
235 posts
 23 Nov 2008 Sun 10:33 pm

I was about to complain on how I am struggling to finish Orhan Pamuk´s book, Istanbul: memories and the city,  but seeing what Vineyards is reading I better not

I heard of military and political tactics but syndiotactic is new to me.

 

 

113.       lady in red
6947 posts
 24 Nov 2008 Mon 12:42 am

 

Quoting vineyards

Chlorine Derivatives of Syndiotactic Polybutadiene

By M. I. Abdullin, A. B. Glazyrin, R. N. Asfandiyarov, V. R. Akhmetova and V. N. Zaboristov

 

 .....and do you recommend it?  {#lang_emotions_bigsmile}

114.       vineyards
1954 posts
 24 Nov 2008 Mon 01:26 am

No but there is a book which I keep reading for many years: The Attic Nights of Aulus Gellius.

Originally written in the first century by Gellius, it is full of ancient stories that would otherwise be lost.

 

115.       lesluv
722 posts
 26 Nov 2008 Wed 02:03 am

The Business

 

nothing like a bit of east end violence to get you through the night!!{#lang_emotions_you_smartass}

116.       lady in red
6947 posts
 26 Nov 2008 Wed 12:25 pm

 

Quoting lesluv

The Business

 

nothing like a bit of east end violence to get you through the night!!{#lang_emotions_you_smartass}

 

 She´s dead ´ard that Martina Cole!!  lol lol lol

117.       catwoman
8933 posts
 27 Nov 2008 Thu 08:54 pm

I am reading a great and fascinating book that every woman should read!!! It´s called "The Cinderella Complex -- women´s hidden fear of independence" by Colette Dowling

 

The Cinderella Complex -- an interview with teh author, absolutely mind blowing!!!

118.       Trudy
7887 posts
 27 Nov 2008 Thu 09:27 pm

 

Quoting catwoman

I am reading a great and fascinating book that every woman should read!!! It´s called "The Cinderella Complex -- women´s hidden fear of independence" by Colette Dowling

 

The Cinderella Complex -- an interview with teh author, absolutely mind blowing!!!

 

 That´s an oldie, I read it when I was 19! From 1981, don´t you think things have changed in more than 25 years?

119.       vineyards
1954 posts
 28 Nov 2008 Fri 02:25 am

Trudy, we can calculate your age easily. Such a faux pas

120.       catwoman
8933 posts
 28 Nov 2008 Fri 06:31 am

 

Quoting Trudy

 That´s an oldie, I read it when I was 19! From 1981, don´t you think things have changed in more than 25 years?

 

yes, it´s an old book and sadly there are no new prints of it! but I was actually thinking the same thing -- ´did things change since she wrote this book´, and I must say NO. I think what she said in the book is still important to teach today. I think that massive numbers of women, most women that I know still are looking for a man to make them happy, make pursuit for a man the main theme of their lives and if they don´t have one, they don´t feel whole. I myself was raised on ´cinderella type of stories´ too, all walt disney movies feed little girls with messages that they need to be saved by a man, that that´s the ultimate happiness... this has not changed at all, and so this book´s message is not any less important then it was 25 years ago. I am in fact disappointed that women are not talking about their ´cinderella complexes´, that they don´t seem to notice it... that there´s not more dialogue and effort to un-learn it...

121.       Trudy
7887 posts
 28 Nov 2008 Fri 10:58 am

 

Quoting vineyards

Trudy, we can calculate your age easily. Such a faux pas

 

 It was never a secret, Vineyards, in April I´ll be 46.

122.       Trudy
7887 posts
 28 Nov 2008 Fri 11:05 am

 

Quoting catwoman

yes, it´s an old book and sadly there are no new prints of it! but I was actually thinking the same thing -- ´did things change since she wrote this book´, and I must say NO. I think what she said in the book is still important to teach today. I think that massive numbers of women, most women that I know still are looking for a man to make them happy, make pursuit for a man the main theme of their lives and if they don´t have one, they don´t feel whole. I myself was raised on ´cinderella type of stories´ too, all walt disney movies feed little girls with messages that they need to be saved by a man, that that´s the ultimate happiness... this has not changed at all, and so this book´s message is not any less important then it was 25 years ago. I am in fact disappointed that women are not talking about their ´cinderella complexes´, that they don´t seem to notice it... that there´s not more dialogue and effort to un-learn it...

 

Don´t agree. Women I know are much more independent than 25 years ago. Maybe the country you are from/live in determines the type of independency? A man? Yes, nice but not as the ultimate goal of life. Women want to study, a career, and only after that they think about a man and/or children (not necessarily together, not here). I know many women with a good life, career, own house, and they choose for a relationship that gives them something instead of being ´servants´ in the relationship to their men. Also women who don´t want to marry, who say: My life is fine, I have everything I need and for the physical part of life I´ll choose short-term relations (not just one night stands!!) or what we call here a LAT-relationship (Living Apart Together, both your own house). Selfish? Probably, but not more than men who think a women is ´just´ a wife, good for clesning, cooking and sex. And there are still plenty of those men.

123.       vineyards
1954 posts
 28 Nov 2008 Fri 12:47 pm

 

Quoting Trudy

 It was never a secret, Vineyards, in April I´ll be 46.

 

I will turn 42 on December 22nd.

Two of my favourite writers -especially at this time of the year- are Coelho and Pamuk. I think these two have already created a style of their own telling stories developing around similar themes which they present with different authentic flavours.

 

I grew up reading  Dostoyevsky, Lermentov, Turgenyev and Aytmatov who are the European representatives of now extinct Eurepean literature. There used to be prominent writers like the Polish Henry Sienkiewicz, Czech Vaclav Havel. When we move  further West we need to travel back in time more to find a reputable writer. In America Steinback and Hemingway are relatively close to present day, in France, Germany and Italy there are writers but neither their number nor their impact does any justice to the influence their nations have. I may be wrong but the last reputable Dutch writer must be Erasmus who was a Renaissance writer.

124.       Trudy
7887 posts
 28 Nov 2008 Fri 01:23 pm

 

Quoting vineyards

I may be wrong but the last reputable Dutch writer must be Erasmus who was a Renaissance writer.

 

Yep. You are wrong. If you take Pamuk as a good writer (Good but I don´t think he´s from the same level as those Russians you mention), then we have quite some good ones too. Writers like J.C. Bloem, Anna Blaman, C. Buddingh´, Andreas Burnier, Remco Campert, Frederik van Eeden, Harry Mulisch, Multatuli (Eduard Douwes Dekker), Gerard Reve and many more are famous. I think most of them have titles that are translated in English.

125.       vineyards
1954 posts
 28 Nov 2008 Fri 01:32 pm

"Prominent" is the word. Pamuk won the Nobel so let´s give him some credit. I have not heard of the Dutch writers you wrote about. Maybe it is because I read mostly technical books these days as part of my job.

 

As for the Soviet writers on the list. Of course they were good and just like we cannot have another Mohammad Ali we cannot have writers like them because we cannot replicate the circumstance that created them.

126.       catwoman
8933 posts
 28 Nov 2008 Fri 07:32 pm

 

Quoting Trudy

Don´t agree. Women I know are much more independent than 25 years ago. Maybe the country you are from/live in determines the type of independency? A man? Yes, nice but not as the ultimate goal of life. Women want to study, a career, and only after that they think about a man and/or children (not necessarily together, not here). I know many women with a good life, career, own house, and they choose for a relationship that gives them something instead of being ´servants´ in the relationship to their men. Also women who don´t want to marry, who say: My life is fine, I have everything I need and for the physical part of life I´ll choose short-term relations (not just one night stands!!) or what we call here a LAT-relationship (Living Apart Together, both your own house). Selfish? Probably, but not more than men who think a women is ´just´ a wife, good for clesning, cooking and sex. And there are still plenty of those men.

 

I´m glad if that´s the situation in Netherlands. And... of course what I think reflects where I live.

127.       catwoman
8933 posts
 13 Jan 2009 Tue 04:35 am

Unfortunately, I gave up on all my fun reading...

128.       lessluv
1052 posts
 13 Jan 2009 Tue 04:42 am

 

Quoting catwoman

Unfortunately, I gave up on all my fun reading...

 

 you´ll get time again {#lang_emotions_smile}

129.       catwoman
8933 posts
 13 Jan 2009 Tue 04:48 am

 

Quoting lessluv

 you´ll get time again {#lang_emotions_smile}

 

probably when I´m 85... {#lang_emotions_sad}

130.       lessluv
1052 posts
 13 Jan 2009 Tue 04:53 am

 

Quoting catwoman

probably when I´m 85... {#lang_emotions_sad}

 

 you will most probably be blind and senile by then so won´t care anyway{#lang_emotions_bigsmile}

131.       catwoman
8933 posts
 13 Jan 2009 Tue 05:00 am

 

Quoting lessluv

 you will most probably be blind and senile by then so won´t care anyway{#lang_emotions_bigsmile}

 

thanks for the optimistic reminder! {#lang_emotions_cry}

132.       kafesteki kush
104 posts
 26 Jan 2009 Mon 12:21 pm

Willigis Jager-A wave is the sea

German monk and master of zen,incredible book.

133.       eiddie
169 posts
 26 Jan 2009 Mon 06:46 pm

When Crickets Cry - Charles Martin

 

A 7 year old girl with a heart defect selling lemonade

trying to save money for a heart transplant...meeting

a stranger with a painful past.....a terrible accident...

....and how fate brought her and that stranger together

once again

 

:  >

134.       portokal
2516 posts
 27 Jan 2009 Tue 07:33 pm

re-reading, actually...

Apuleius The Golden Ass

stated to be the first novel in history - appart from some greek writings - it is the story of a young noble man Lucius who, by wanting to get involved in magic, ends up being transformed in a... donkey. He has long journey to pass before he regains his human features.

135.       _harmony_
31 posts
 27 Jan 2009 Tue 09:54 pm

Kurt Vonnegut "A Man Without a Country"

 

Rereading 3rd time.

 

Last book of this great author, so sarcastic, bright sence of humor and huge expierence of life .... just how to be a good human being ....

136.       mltm
3690 posts
 27 Jan 2009 Tue 09:58 pm

Melih Cevdet Anday - Raziye

 

I have read two thirds of it, and don´t have any idea how it´s going to end.

 

The story is about 3 persons. One is a young man who runs away from his busy life and goes to pass some time with his old uncle in a western turkish village, and falls in love with a beautiful girl who is adopted by this man.

137.       kafesteki kush
104 posts
 28 Jan 2009 Wed 11:08 pm

The book of Urantia

quite a new insight by anonymous writer into Universe creation,history of civilisation,christianity and the fate of mankind.

138.       portokal
2516 posts
 01 Feb 2009 Sun 05:55 pm

Apuleius, still...

And " A Room with a View " by E.M. Forster

139.       eiddie
169 posts
 02 Feb 2009 Mon 06:04 pm

The Secret Supper - Javier Sierra

 

A complicated work of fiction about Leonardo Da Vinci´s famous ´ coded ´

painting ´ -  The Last Supper

 

:  >



Edited (2/2/2009) by eiddie

140.       bod
5999 posts
 06 Mar 2009 Fri 02:03 am

I am trying to read a small Turkish children´s book called:

Filler Arabalarýn Üzerine Oturmaz

 

But I am not doing very well - I haven´t managed the first page yet

141.       tamikidakika
1346 posts
 20 Mar 2009 Fri 10:37 pm

I just finished reading Puslu Kitalar Atlasi (Atlas of Foggy Continents) by Oktay Ihsan Anar. That` s such a well written novel and definitely underrated. I don`t think it`s available in foreign languages.

 

and now I`m reading Son Ada (The Last Island), the latest novel of Livaneli.

142.       Trudy
7887 posts
 20 Mar 2009 Fri 10:41 pm

 

Quoting tamikidakika

I just finished reading Puslu Kitalar Atlasi (Atlas of Foggy Continents) by Oktay Ihsan Anar. That` s such a well written novel and definitely underrated. I don`t think it`s available in foreign languages.

 

and now I`m reading Son Ada (The Last Island), the latest novel of Livaneli.

 

 The first one is available in English and in German (Der Atlas unsichtbarer Kontinente).

143.       tamikidakika
1346 posts
 20 Mar 2009 Fri 10:46 pm

 

Quoting Trudy

 

 

 The first one is available in English and in German (Der Atlas unsichtbarer Kontinente).

 

but I`m sure you haven`t read itBig smile

144.       Trudy
7887 posts
 20 Mar 2009 Fri 10:48 pm

 

Quoting tamikidakika

 

 

but I`m sure you haven`t read itBig smile

 

 Right. You said you thought it isn´t available in other languages and I just wanted to be helpful.

145.       tamikidakika
1346 posts
 20 Mar 2009 Fri 10:51 pm

 

Quoting Trudy

 

 

 Right. You said you thought it isn´t available in other languages and I just wanted to be helpful.

 

ok, did I say you were wrong?, why are you being fierce now? Big smile

146.       Trudy
7887 posts
 20 Mar 2009 Fri 10:56 pm

 

Quoting tamikidakika

 

 

ok, did I say you were wrong?, why are you being fierce now? Big smile

 

 I´m not fierce. It just sounded sarcastic from your side.

147.       tamikidakika
1346 posts
 20 Mar 2009 Fri 10:57 pm

 

Quoting Trudy

 

 

 I´m not fierce. It just sounded sarcastic from your side.

 

I wasn`t not being sarcastic but you`re being boring nowBig smile

148.       Trudy
7887 posts
 20 Mar 2009 Fri 10:59 pm

 

Quoting tamikidakika

 

 

I wasn`t not being sarcastic but you`re being boring nowBig smile

 

 I guess I learned it from the master...... lol lol

149.       tamikidakika
1346 posts
 20 Mar 2009 Fri 11:01 pm

 

Quoting Trudy

 

 

 I guess I learned it from the master...... lol lol

 

who is it? Yilgun?<img src='/static/images/smileys//lol.gif' alt='lol'> (fast)

150.       Trudy
7887 posts
 20 Mar 2009 Fri 11:05 pm

 

Quoting tamikidakika

 

 

who is it? Yilgun?<img src='/static/images/smileys//lol.gif' alt='lol'> (fast)

 

 Don´t be so modest, canim.

151.       MarioninTurkey
6124 posts
 24 Mar 2009 Tue 10:34 am

I enjoyed Beyond the Orchard by Azize Ethem last week ... it is a good analysis of the concept of "yabanci". As a Kiwi she is accepted into the village more than the flash Turks from the city.

 

Now reading Foreign Devils on the Silk Road. Fascinating book by Peter Hopkirk on the stealing of antiques from Xinjiang province (bit similar to LÝRs column this week ....)

152.       lady in red
6947 posts
 24 Mar 2009 Tue 11:07 am

 

Quoting MarioninTurkey

I enjoyed Beyond the Orchard by Azize Ethem last week ... it is a good analysis of the concept of "yabanci". As a Kiwi she is accepted into the village more than the flash Turks from the city.

 

Now reading Foreign Devils on the Silk Road. Fascinating book by Peter Hopkirk on the stealing of antiques from Xinjiang province (bit similar to LÝRs column this week ....)

 

 Libralady not me!!!

153.       libralady
5152 posts
 24 Mar 2009 Tue 02:19 pm

 

Quoting MarioninTurkey

I enjoyed Beyond the Orchard by Azize Ethem last week ... it is a good analysis of the concept of "yabanci". As a Kiwi she is accepted into the village more than the flash Turks from the city.

 

Now reading Foreign Devils on the Silk Road. Fascinating book by Peter Hopkirk on the stealing of antiques from Xinjiang province (bit similar to LÝRs column this week ....)

 

 Cry

154.       TheAenigma
5001 posts
 25 Mar 2009 Wed 09:03 pm

 

Quoting libralady

 

 

 Cry

 

 Hahahaha how nice to get credit for your article! lol

155.       libralady
5152 posts
 25 Mar 2009 Wed 09:09 pm

 

Quoting TheAenigma

 

 

 Hahahaha how nice to get credit for your article! lol

 

Stamps feet............ storming off now for reminding me Sad now going to look at wiki about Adana´s horsies Confused  (Will probably help me sleep better tonight Unsure 

 

156.       accountant
203 posts
 30 Jun 2009 Tue 07:22 pm

LE DEREGLEMENT DU MONDE - ÇÝVÝSÝ ÇIKMIÞ DÜNYA

by AMIN MAALOUF

 

 

 

 



Edited (7/21/2009) by accountant

157.       libralady
5152 posts
 02 Jul 2009 Thu 02:37 pm

Having just read the brilliant biography, Mad, Bad and Dangerous by Sir Ranulph Fiennes I thought it is about time that I read a novel.

 

So I bought the classic novel "Crime and Punishment" by Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky.  It was first published in 12 monthly installments in the literary journal "The Russian Messenger" in 1866 and later published in a single volume.

 

The story focuses on the mental anguish of an impoverished ex-student who plans to kill an unscrupulous pawn broker, to solve his financial misery and to rid the world of an evil worthless parasite.

 

So far, it is a griping story and the author is able to portray for the reader the torment and mental anguish felt by [the main characture,Raskolnikov], and relaying the smallest detail of his thoughts.

158.       alameda
3499 posts
 02 Jul 2009 Thu 06:55 pm

 

Quoting libralady

Having just read the brilliant biography, Mad, Bad and Dangerous by Sir Ranulph Fiennes I thought it is about time that I read a novel.

 

So I bought the classic novel "Crime and Punishment" by Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky.  It was first published in 12 monthly installments in the literary journal "The Russian Messenger" in 1866 and later published in a single volume.

 

The story focuses on the mental anguish of an impoverished ex-student who plans to kill an unscrupulous pawn broker, to solve his financial misery and to rid the world of an evil worthless parasite.

 

So far, it is a griping story and the author is able to portray for the reader the torment and mental anguish felt by [the main characture,Raskolnikov], and relaying the smallest detail of his thoughts.

 

 Publishing in 12 installments was a great idea.  That way you get/have to digest a chapter at a time.  It´s been years since I read that book.  Do you have a reading strategy?....the book is divided into 6 parts, would you read a part a month?

159.       barba_mama
1629 posts
 02 Jul 2009 Thu 09:59 pm

I´ve started with Sofie´s World, but stopped so I can read it when I´m in Turkey (sooooon!)

It´s a good introduction on philosophy, and you´ll find Turkey in there too (as the birthplace of the first known philosophers).

160.       libralady
5152 posts
 02 Jul 2009 Thu 10:11 pm

 

Quoting alameda

 

 

 Publishing in 12 installments was a great idea.  That way you get/have to digest a chapter at a time.  It´s been years since I read that book.  Do you have a reading strategy?....the book is divided into 6 parts, would you read a part a month?

 

 No, I shall probably finish it in a week.  I am already 1/3rd through in 3 days.

161.       accountant
203 posts
 03 Jul 2009 Fri 05:32 pm

Best books for July 2009.

 

1-  “Crime and Punishment" –Two books- by  Fyodor Dostoyevsky – Russia. One of the best world classic novels.

 

2-  “Sofie´s World” ( Sofies Verden )  by Jostein Gaarder – Norway.

A good philosophy book.History of the world philosophy.

 

3-  “ Le deglement Du Monde” by Amin Maalof - Lebanon. A newest history and research book.

 

  4- “Kodin” by Panait Istrati – Romania .A very nice novel.

 



Edited (7/3/2009) by accountant
Edited (7/3/2009) by accountant

162.       alameda
3499 posts
 12 Jul 2009 Sun 10:34 pm

Zorro


 


by


Isabel Allende


 


It´s a good read, particularly if one is interested in that aspect of CA history.

163.       Deli_kizin
6376 posts
 14 Jul 2009 Tue 04:24 pm

Dante Alighieri, Divine Comedy-inferno (but in Dutch translation).

Haven´t made much progression yet due to the very long and comprehensive introduction from the translator, but so far very delighted to have finally started a book that has been on my list for a long time, and with upcoming trip to Italy seems about time I read it.

 

In the meantime for some ´lighter amusement´ I am also reading Jan Wolkers´ ´De perzik van onsterfelijkheid´ (the peach of immortality), a fine piece of Dutch literature.

164.       teaschip
3870 posts
 14 Jul 2009 Tue 07:52 pm

Janet Evanovich "Finger Lickin Fifteen"  I love her books!

165.       alameda
3499 posts
 20 Jul 2009 Mon 06:58 pm

The Kite Runner

by

Khaled Hosseini


It´s been on my list of "must read" for a while.  It´s a very disturbing book, but also an interesting view into the relatively peaceful and idyllic prewar Afghanistan.

166.       Elisabeth
5732 posts
 20 Jul 2009 Mon 08:37 pm

 

Quoting alameda

The Kite Runner

by

Khaled Hosseini


It´s been on my list of "must read" for a while.  It´s a very disturbing book, but also an interesting view into the relatively peaceful and idyllic prewar Afghanistan.

 

 I agree, Kite Runner is a beautifully written book.  A bit disturbing but a story you can´t stop reading.

 

If you like it, try "A Thousand Splendid Suns."  It was also a good read.

167.       lady in red
6947 posts
 20 Jul 2009 Mon 09:05 pm

 

Quoting Elisabeth

 

 

 I agree, Kite Runner is a beautifully written book.  A bit disturbing but a story you can´t stop reading.

 

If you like it, try "A Thousand Splendid Suns."  It was also a good read.

 

I agree too!     I read ´A Thousand Splendid Suns´ first and I think I actually preferred it.  I have also seen the film of ´The Kite Runner´ but like most films of really good books it was a little bit of a let-down.  I wonder if there are any plans for a film of ´Splendid Suns´?

 

My current read is ´Making Money´ - Terry Pratchett - I just love his books - they make me laugh out loud   (Somehow I don´t think I fit in with the ´intellectuals´ of TC!  lol )

 

 

 



Edited (7/20/2009) by lady in red

168.       alameda
3499 posts
 20 Jul 2009 Mon 09:20 pm

 

Quoting Elisabeth

 

 

 I agree, Kite Runner is a beautifully written book.  A bit disturbing but a story you can´t stop reading.

 

If you like it, try "A Thousand Splendid Suns."  It was also a good read.

 Yes, I didn´t read anything about it other than it was a good book and about Afghanistan....there was something about kites...what did I know?....so I was quite shocked as the events unfolded...not being in any way prepared for them.....Puking There are a lot of Afghan refugees (in fact a lot of refugees in general) where I live, and I´ve made friends with some of them. 

Their stories are amazing.  The hopes and dreams, the nightmares they escaped. They there is the issue of their status and how it changes when they arrive here.  The once wealthy and respected become gas station attendants, clerks in bargain stores, or flea market dealers.  The Afghans seem to gravitate to the flea markets. I have been amazed at how quickly they learn the American wants in their flea market stalls.  Very rapidly they learn what is collectable and stock their stalls with just that.  They have quickly learned how to price things, and they are quite open to exchange of information.

I guess I´m sort of a flea market connoisseur, and I find the Afghan dealers intriguing. The way it was described in the book was pretty accurate. They usually have some sort of van, very well equipped with carpets and tea service inside. It really is reminiscent of the old caravans.

169.       Elisabeth
5732 posts
 20 Jul 2009 Mon 09:53 pm

 

Quoting lady in red

 

 

I agree too!     I read ´A Thousand Splendid Suns´ first and I think I actually preferred it.  I have also seen the film of ´The Kite Runner´ but like most films of really good books it was a little bit of a let-down.  I wonder if there are any plans for a film of ´Splendid Suns´?

 

My current read is ´Making Money´ - Terry Pratchett - I just love his books - they make me laugh out loud   (Somehow I don´t think I fit in with the ´intellectuals´ of TC!  lol )

 

 

 

 

 You´re not alone.......TRUST ME.....I try not to read anything too intellectual.  I usually read to escape!<img src='/static/images/smileys//lol.gif' alt='lol'> (fast)  I have been known to read an occasional trashy romance novel...Shy

170.       alameda
3499 posts
 20 Jul 2009 Mon 10:00 pm

 

Quoting lady in red

 

I agree too!     I read ´A Thousand Splendid Suns´ first and I think I actually preferred it.  I have also seen the film of ´The Kite Runner´ but like most films of really good books it was a little bit of a let-down.  I wonder if there are any plans for a film of ´Splendid Suns´?

 

My current read is ´Making Money´ - Terry Pratchett - I just love his books - they make me laugh out loud   (Somehow I don´t think I fit in with the ´intellectuals´ of TC!  lol

 

 

 If you have read a book and then see the film, most often they are dissapointing.  Hmmmm...Splendid Suns....sounds like a must read.

 

I have to admit though, much of my reading depends of what I find of interest at garage sales.  Both my last two reads were garage sale finds.  I much prefer paying $1 than $15 or $20 for a good book, although I do break down and order hardbacks of ones I particularly want to read.

 

Terry Prachett was recently diagnosed with Alzheimers, did you know that?  He sounds like a very interesting man.  I really should read some of his works sometime.  I spent a whole winter one year reading Edgar Rice Burroughs...it was wonderful. 

 

"Alzheimer´s disease


In August 2007 Pratchett was misdiagnosed as having had a minor stroke in 2004 or 2005, which was believed to have damaged the right side of his brain. While his motor skills had been affected, the observed damage had not impaired his ability to write (or at least no one noticed the difference).On 11 December 2007 Pratchett posted online that he had been newly diagnosed with a very rare form of early-onset Alzheimer´s disease, which he said "lay behind this year´s phantom ´stroke´." He has a rare form of the disease called posterior cortical atrophy, in which areas at the back of the brain begin to shrink and shrivel. Pratchett appealed to people to "keep things cheerful", and proclaimed that "we are taking it fairly philosophically down here and possibly with a mild optimism."

171.       teaschip
3870 posts
 21 Jul 2009 Tue 01:39 am

 

Quoting Elisabeth

 

 

 I agree, Kite Runner is a beautifully written book.  A bit disturbing but a story you can´t stop reading.

 

If you like it, try "A Thousand Splendid Suns."  It was also a good read.

 

I just tried watching this movie the other night.  It sadly lasted 10 minutes..I have a real problem watching a film I have to read, what they are saying.Sad

 

172.       sonunda
5004 posts
 22 Jul 2009 Wed 01:15 pm

 

Quoting Elisabeth

 

 

 You´re not alone.......TRUST ME.....I try not to read anything too intellectual.  I usually read to escape!<img src='/static/images/smileys//lol.gif' alt='lol'> (fast)  I have been known to read an occasional trashy romance novel...Shy

 

Hooray-good for you! (and LIR)

173.       birdy
245 posts
 27 Sep 2009 Sun 02:48 pm

Minaret by Leila Aboulela

wonderful read in which the author shows totally different face of Islam  from pictures and prejudices westerners have in mind.

She writes about filling emptiness with choices,finding identity in multicultural societies and about faith in life.A compulsory read for all who claim to know all about MuslimsWink

174.       teaschip
3870 posts
 27 Sep 2009 Sun 04:48 pm

 

Quoting birdy

Minaret by Leila Aboulela

wonderful read in which the author shows totally different face of Islam  from pictures and prejudices westerners have in mind.

She writes about filling emptiness with choices,finding identity in multicultural societies and about faith in life.A compulsory read for all who claim to know all about MuslimsWink

 

 Sounds very interesting...I´ll have to read it myself...

175.       alameda
3499 posts
 27 Sep 2009 Sun 05:44 pm

Stiff

The curious life of human cadavers

 

by Mary Roach

 

It was certainly interesting.  I heard inverviews with the author numerous times, and thought it sounded interesting.  Still, it´s not something I probably would have bought, given the subject, but I found it during one of my garage sale adventures being sold for one dollar. How could I resist?

 

Anyone who is thinking about making a donation of their own cadaver would well benefit from reading this book.

 

 

 

 

176.       birdy
245 posts
 28 Sep 2009 Mon 01:39 am

for all dreamers-Eric Emmanuel Schmitt the dreamer from ostend-wonderful stories of those  and for those who are not afraid of dreams

177.       yilgun-2010
572 posts
 29 Sep 2009 Tue 02:11 am

1- "The Man Without Qualities" ,  " Niteliksiz Adam " by Robert Musil  ( 3 kitap )

Harikulade bir roman, 20.Yüzyýlýn ve modernizmin birkaç baþyapýtýndan biri, çok önemli bir baþucu kitabý...Kitap, roman sanatýný ortaya koymuþ. "Roman nasýl yazýlýr" diye soranlara güzel bir cevap.Bir roman severin okumasý gereken bir yapýt... 

 

2- "The Time Traveler´s Wife" ,  " Zaman Yolcusunun Karýsý "    by Adrey  Niffenegger

Romanda, zaman ötesi, metafizik yaþamda, ilginç ve hüzün verici bir aþk öyküsü anlatýlmaya çalýþýlmýþ.Bu roman sinemaya da uyarlanmýþ.

( Romanýn konusu ilginç ve iyi seçilmiþ; fakat akýcý ve rahat okunan bir yapýt deðil.)

 

3-"The Lost  Symbol" , " Son Sembol" , by Dan Brown

Din ve tarih içerikli Dan Brown romanlarýnýn sonuncusu.Brown´Ã½n en çok "Melekler ve Þeytanlar" romanýný beðenmiþtim.Din ve tarih içerikli roman okumayý sevenlere Brown´nýn bu son yapýtý  tavsiye edilebilir.

 



Edited (9/29/2009) by yilgun-2010
Edited (9/29/2009) by yilgun-2010
Edited (10/10/2009) by yilgun-2010
Edited (10/12/2009) by yilgun-2010
Edited (10/12/2009) by yilgun-2010

178.       lady in red
6947 posts
 29 Sep 2009 Tue 09:03 am

 

Quoting yilgun-2010

1- "The Man Without Qualities" ,  " Niteliksiz Adam " by Robert Musil

Harikulade bir roman, 20.Yüzyýlýn ve modernizmin birkaç baþyapýtýndan biri, çok önemli bir baþucu kitabý

 

2- "The Time Traveler´s Wife" ,  " Zaman Yolcusunun Karýsý "    by Adrey  Niffenegger

Zaman ötesi, metafizik yaþamda, ilginç ve hüzün verici bir aþk romaný

 

The Turkish postal system is getting better and better!  lol

179.       alameda
3499 posts
 11 Oct 2009 Sun 05:01 am

The Hidden Messages in Water by Masaru Emoto


and Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden



Edited (10/11/2009) by alameda [add ]

180.       nifrtity
1806 posts
 11 Oct 2009 Sun 03:12 pm

iknow 7 languages but i perfer reading books in english and arabic

ilike Sheakspeer and Charles Dekineinz

ilike arabic poems and historybooks



Edited (10/11/2009) by nifrtity

181.       lady in red
6947 posts
 11 Oct 2009 Sun 03:41 pm

 

Quoting nifrtity

iknow 7 languages but i perfer reading books in english and arabic

ilike Sheakspeer and Charles Dekineinz

ilike arabic poems and historybooks

 

If you are reading Shakespeare and Charles Dickens - check out the spelling of their names!!  lol

 

(why is it non-native English speakers always seem to head for the books that are most difficult to understand?  What´s wrong with a nice modern novel where you would learn modern English? - but stay away from the likes of Irvine Welsh!!)

182.       Daydreamer
3743 posts
 11 Oct 2009 Sun 03:46 pm

 

Quoting lady in red

 

 

If you are reading Shakespeare and Charles Dickens - check out the spelling of their names!!  lol

 

(why is it non-native English speakers always seem to head for the books that are most difficult to understand?  What´s wrong with a nice modern novel where you would learn modern English? - but stay away from the likes of Irvine Welsh!!)

The most difficult book to understand for me was Joyce´s Ulysses. It physically hurt me to read it for my British literature course at the uni ScaredAs for contemporary writers, I´m currently reading Picoult´s My Sister´s Keeper and I love it

 

183.       birdy
245 posts
 11 Oct 2009 Sun 11:43 pm

 

Quoting lady in red

 

 

If you are reading Shakespeare and Charles Dickens - check out the spelling of their names!!  lol

 

(why is it non-native English speakers always seem to head for the books that are most difficult to understand?  What´s wrong with a nice modern novel where you would learn modern English? - but stay away from the likes of Irvine Welsh!!)

 

 Lir don´t be mean..have you been attending tami´s courses lately???<img src='/static/images/smileys//lol.gif' alt='lol'> (fast)you know she knows 7!!!!languages<img src='/static/images/smileys//lol.gif' alt='lol'> (fast)

184.       lady in red
6947 posts
 12 Oct 2009 Mon 10:37 am

 

Quoting birdy

 

 

 Lir don´t be mean..have you been attending tami´s courses lately???<img src='/static/images/smileys//lol.gif' alt='lol'> (fast)you know she knows 7!!!!languages<img src='/static/images/smileys//lol.gif' alt='lol'> (fast)

 

I admit - I am jealous

185.       birdy
245 posts
 13 Oct 2009 Tue 11:45 pm

 

Quoting lady in red

 

 

I admit - I am jealous

 

 all of Sheakspeer and Charles Dekineinz???I guessWink

186.       _AE_
677 posts
 14 Oct 2009 Wed 02:18 pm

 

Quoting birdy

 

 

 all of Sheakspeer and Charles Dekineinz???

 

 Shakespeare is completely overrated in my opinion!  He was a soap opera writer for the times (admittedly with some beautiful prose) but hardly deserved of the almost religious devotion that he has gained...

187.       libralady
5152 posts
 14 Oct 2009 Wed 02:39 pm

 

Quoting _AE_

 

 

 Shakespeare is completely overrated in my opinion!  He was a soap opera writer for the times (admittedly with some beautiful prose) but hardly deserved of the almost religious devotion that he has gained...

 

 What doth thou mean oh fair maiden?<img src='/static/images/smileys//lol.gif' alt='lol'>

188.       alex de souza
60 posts
 14 Oct 2009 Wed 03:07 pm

 

Quoting _AE_

 

 

 Shakespeare is completely overrated in my opinion!  He was a soap opera writer for the times (admittedly with some beautiful prose) but hardly deserved of the almost religious devotion that he has gained...

 

As an english person you are supposed to know that How Shakespeare improved your language.  He is the best playwright ever and it is really not arguable. I cant imagine English Language and literature and Theatre without Shakespeare.  Friends, Romans please dont be so relentless

189.       libralady
5152 posts
 14 Oct 2009 Wed 03:16 pm

 

Quoting alex de souza

 

 

As an english person you are supposed to know that How Shakespeare improved your language.  He is the best playwright ever and it is really not arguable. I cant imagine English Language and literature and Theatre without Shakespeare.  Friends, Romans please dont be so relentless

 

 No Shakespere, no one wearing silly donkeys head <img src='/static/images/smileys//lol.gif' alt='lol'>

190.       _AE_
677 posts
 14 Oct 2009 Wed 05:16 pm

 

Quoting alex de souza

 

 He is the best playwright ever and it is really not arguable.

 

Well actually it IS arguable!!!  

 

To be the best poet, or not to be, that is the question

Whether ´tis nobler in the mind to suffer

The terrible storylines and outrageous plots

Or to take arms against the de souza and differ

And by opposing end them, To die - to sleep

 

By my troth, de souza, I agree they are beautiful words, but let it never be forgotten that they were written to entertain like a gentle drop of soap opera

191.       alex de souza
60 posts
 14 Oct 2009 Wed 05:35 pm

 

Quoting _AE_

 

 

 

By my troth, de souza, I agree they are beautiful words, but let it never be forgotten that they were written to entertain like a gentle drop of soap opera

 

Many of legend painters were painting only not to starve but it doesnt make their work less important or less beautiful eh?   you have every right to think that Shakespeare is not the best playwright ever but dont ever voice what you think about him when you are with a English Linguist or an actor. By the way thank you for your beautiful words which i didnt understand at all

192.       Elisabeth
5732 posts
 14 Oct 2009 Wed 06:00 pm

Strategic Management: Formulation, Implementation and Control....By Pearce and Robinson

 

It´s a real page turner......Anyone want it when I am done with it?  <img src='/static/images/smileys//lol.gif' alt='lol'> (fast)

193.       nifrtity
1806 posts
 21 Oct 2009 Wed 06:38 pm

Ilike arabic poems like ALmoutanabi and Ahmed shawky ,Abu alqasim alshabi

194.       birdy
245 posts
 21 Oct 2009 Wed 11:04 pm

Eric Emmanuel Schmitt-The dreamer of  Ostend..not only for females with its outlandish eroticismBig smile

195.       alex de souza
60 posts
 22 Oct 2009 Thu 01:49 pm

Soren Kierkegaard -- Fear And Trembling

196.       Kiara
145 posts
 25 Oct 2009 Sun 03:04 am

Digital Fortress by Dan Brown (been reading for a couple months...not much time for reading lately

197.       yilgun-2010
572 posts
 14 Nov 2009 Sat 03:42 am

1- "Cumhuriyet, Türk  Mucizesi",  by Turgut Özakman,  2009

2- "Diriliş, Çanakkale 1915"  by Turgut Özakman,  2008

3-" Şu  Çılgın Türkler",  by Turgut Özakman,  2007

 

Research Review of Books  on Turkish History :  Atatürk, Turkish War of Independence and the Republic of Chronology, true story of foundation of modern Turkish Republic.



Edited (11/14/2009) by yilgun-2010
Edited (11/14/2009) by yilgun-2010

198.       catwoman
8933 posts
 14 Nov 2009 Sat 04:20 am

The Great War for Civilization by Robert Fisk

199.       Kiara
145 posts
 19 Nov 2009 Thu 05:29 pm

" Victoria " by Knut Hamsun, 1899 {#emotions_dlg.bigsmile}

200.       Trudy
7887 posts
 18 Apr 2010 Sun 02:33 pm

I´ve just read ´The boy in the striped pajamas´ by John Boyne. Wonderful written book about one of the most horrible events in human history: The Holocaust. 

 

 

201.       ptaszek
440 posts
 19 Apr 2010 Mon 09:07 pm

 

Quoting Trudy

I´ve just read ´The boy in the striped pajamas´ by John Boyne. Wonderful written book about one of the most horrible events in human history: The Holocaust. 

 

 

 

if i can recommend a read-have you ever read"the painted bird"by Jerzy Kosinski?if not ..rush to the library..

202.       gokuyum
5050 posts
 23 Apr 2010 Fri 05:06 pm

 

Quoting ptaszek

 

 

if i can recommend a read-have you ever read"the painted bird"by Jerzy Kosinski?if not ..rush to the library..

 

 The Painted Bird is wonderful. I like Kosinski and his approach to the dark side of humanity.



Edited (4/23/2010) by gokuyum

203.       gokuyum
5050 posts
 23 Apr 2010 Fri 05:15 pm

I read these books recently:

 

1)Giosaphat Barbaro - Anadolu ve İran´a Seyahat

 

2)Micheal Löwy - Kafka Boyun Eğmeyen Hayalperest

 

3)Faruk Duman - Piri

 

4) Henry James - Bly´ın Gizemi (The Turn of The Screw)

 

5)Faruk Duman - Av Dönüşleri

 

6)Antonio Lopez Campillo - Hızlandırılmış Ateizm Dersleri

 

7)Ahmet Cemal - Giderayak

204.       Trudy
7887 posts
 24 Apr 2010 Sat 09:27 am

Blindman´s bluff by Faye Kellerman

205.       Trudy
7887 posts
 24 Apr 2010 Sat 09:27 am

Blindman´s bluff by Faye Kellerman

206.       gokuyum
5050 posts
 26 Apr 2010 Mon 06:17 pm

Ahmet Mithat Efendi / Çingene (The Gipsy)

207.       Elisabeth
5732 posts
 04 May 2010 Tue 08:07 pm

Shutter Island....Dennis Lehane.  A bit scary but a fabulous psychological thriller!{#emotions_dlg.scared} 

208.       thehandsom
7403 posts
 03 Sep 2010 Fri 12:06 am

The Bridge: A Journey Between Orient and Occident by Geert Mak
...
In 2006, Geert Mak spent weeks on the Galata bridge, one of Istanbul’s busiest, getting to know the pavement merchants: the tea vendor, the book salesman, the peddler of orthopedic soles and the boys who trade in illegal cigarettes.  Most of them are from villages in Turkey’s far east and are desperately poor, barely able to their keep their heads above water; they live from one day, one hour, to the next. And they all have their own worries, their strategies for survival, their hopes, their own stories. The result is ‘a travelogue covering 490 metres’, in the author’s words.

Geert Mak is a journalist and historian, and one of The Netherlands’ bestselling writers;..

http://www.rbooks.co.uk/product.aspx?id=1846551382

---

A short / sweet/ charming book... Not in depth as far as the history is concerned.. But an excellent book for people who want to know a bit about Istanbul and its history..

 

Tulip liked this message
209.       Leo S
183 posts
 04 Jun 2017 Sun 10:37 am

 

Quoting ptaszek

 

 

if i can recommend a read-have you ever read"the painted bird"by Jerzy Kosinski?if not ..rush to the library..

 

The Poles that knew Jerzy were very upset that he protrayed Poles that way in his novel and Poles only ever treated him nicely. Yes, it is fictional work and he as a writer can write what he wants, it´s not based on factual events for the most part I have heard. I have not read it but plan to. I can give a proper evaluation then.

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