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Religious hatred in the American society
(30 Messages in 3 pages - View all)
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20.       Elisabeth
5732 posts
 16 Jul 2008 Wed 08:03 pm

Quoting girleegirl:

Quoting catwoman:


Ok, ok.... Just don't ask me to not be an admin... please!


Ohhhh wait!! I didn't know that was an option! I demand to be made an admin!!!!!!!!!



GG for Admin!! Delete Catwoman!! The world has gone MAD!!

21.       alameda
3499 posts
 16 Jul 2008 Wed 10:27 pm

It´s very sad and unfortunate that this

Islamophobia

has taken hold and grown in the last few years. I live here and do see it. Of course in day to day actions, people try to hide it, but give them a chance to post things anonymous, you see quite a different picture. It does exist and has been growing. No, not all Americans hold such views, but too many ignore or are not active in resisting such trends.

It is at times more obvious. It is there in too many people, we even see it here. It´s not as blatant, but the message is still there. Over and over again anti Islamic posts are made accusing Muslims of all sorts of atrocities. Muslims are part of the human family and as part of that, there are good ones and bad ones.

It´s dangerous trend, very dangerous. It is the first step in the dehumanization process. Dehumanize people, make them into the ´other´ and you can do what you want with them.

´ Sociologists and historians often view dehumanization as central to some or all types of wars. Governments sometimes present ´enemy´ civilians or soldiers as less than human so that voters will be more likely to support a war they may otherwise consider mass murder. Dictatorships use the same process to prevent opposition by citizens. Such efforts often depend on preexisting racist, sectarian or otherwise biased beliefs, which governments play upon through various types of media, presenting ´enemies´ as barbaric, undeserving of rights, and a threat to the nation. Alternately, states sometimes present the enemy government or way of life as barbaric and its citizens as childlike and incapable of managing their own affairs. Such arguments have been used as a pretext for colonialism.´

Dehumanize

22.       catwoman
8933 posts
 16 Jul 2008 Wed 10:56 pm

Quoting alameda:


Dehumanize


Unfortunately, you are right. Dehumanization of all groups is used to ostracize them and justify mistreatment. Jokes about women or Polish people are daily bread.

23.       alameda
3499 posts
 17 Jul 2008 Thu 01:43 am

Quoting catwoman:

Quoting alameda:


Dehumanize


Unfortunately, you are right. Dehumanization of all groups is used to ostracize them and justify mistreatment. Jokes about women or Polish people are daily bread.



...do you realize we agree on something?

24.       peacetrain
1905 posts
 17 Jul 2008 Thu 02:12 am

Quoting alameda:

Quoting catwoman:

Quoting alameda:


Dehumanize


Unfortunately, you are right. Dehumanization of all groups is used to ostracize them and justify mistreatment. Jokes about women or Polish people are daily bread.



...do you realize we agree on something?



I would agree with that too. I think the media should shoulder the blame for a lot of it. You mention Polish people CW and in the UK at the moment they have received some negative press, for example:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-510873/Polish-migrants-living-Britain-claiming-21m-child-benefits-children-left-behind.html

The Daily Mail is often sensationalist and it's articles like this that can influence certain sections of the population. It's my view that the tax payers' money is not safe in the hands of the Government and I don't blame anyone for claiming something they are able to claim. So it seems, it is the government and the media that breed ill feeling toward different groups of people at one time or another and this can escalate in times of economic crisis.

25.       alameda
3499 posts
 17 Jul 2008 Thu 02:37 am

Hmm....it isn't only in the US....

Not in My Backyard, Say an Increasing Number of Germans

'The issue at hand wasn't the construction of a missile base or a new nuclear power plant. Yet the media reported 'turmoil' and an 'enraged' audience in a school auditorium in Ehrenfeld, a district of the German city of Cologne. The mood was almost comparable to that of the protest gatherings once held against nuclear missiles or reactors.

Instead the outrage was directed at a huge mosque planned for the area. Still, the words used by the project's opponents called to mind the protests of earlier times. 'The minarets even look like missiles,' railed one woman. A man said the mosque's dome reminded him 'of a nuclear plant.'

26.       Cacık
296 posts
 17 Jul 2008 Thu 09:33 am

I agree there is much hype all over the world that pushes people to complete misunderstanding of other cultures and faiths.

There have been numerous press articles here in Turkey about missionaries being some sort of awful group of people. Christians and Jews are also on the receiving end of what Alameda describes in USA about Muslims (I think that's where you are ) I have experienced it myself.

It is present everywhere. Muslims misunderstood in Europe, Christians misunderstood in Turkey, some people sometimes mistreated and abused.

Thank goodness we all here agree that it is wrong, whereever you are and whoever you are.

27.       Daydreamer
3743 posts
 17 Jul 2008 Thu 09:44 am

Quoting Cacık:



It is present everywhere. Muslims misunderstood in Europe, Christians misunderstood in Turkey, some people sometimes mistreated and abused.

Thank goodness we all here agree that it is wrong, whereever you are and whoever you are.



You're absolutely right! I wish there was a way to avoid such misunderstandings...

28.       Cacık
296 posts
 17 Jul 2008 Thu 11:23 am

Quote:

Quote:



You're absolutely right! I wish there was a way to avoid such misunderstandings...



Talkng on Forums like this and educating each other.

There is no point playing tennis with weblinks that criticize other religions.

Talking and opening our hearts to the fact that we have all made mistakes, our ancestors have all made mistakes but we CAN MOVE FORWARD positively and cohesively.

IMHO no-one can move forward until they realise that they
are not perfect and their history is not perfect either.

As a Christian in Turkey I know first hand of the regular problems, social, political and bureaucratical (if that is a word) and sometime very dangerous situations my fellow believers have faced. I have also experienced the loving kindness of Muslim friends who have been accepting and understanding.

We have learned to accept each other, and although we are totally different in our faiths, it doesn't effect how we love and care for each other.

And choose to believe that people here who cause difficulties and dangers or physical hurt to non-Muslim faiths are just ignorant, they have not had the opportunity to learn and they need help to understand. There is no point bashing them, you must help them !

Tolerance is everything, but those who choose never to listen and accept that they (not the individual but the faith or culture they *claim* to represent) are also at fault for historical and current events regardless of which faith or culture you refer to, these are the people IMHO who need to make a change.

There is a way forward, it is accepting our past, admiting our fault (which we all all), and agreeing to learn from our mistakes and walk forward together.

29.       Roswitha
4132 posts
 17 Jul 2008 Thu 10:32 pm

The outcry against the German Mosque is obviously prejudice-driven. This is no different than the recent refusal of France to grand citizenship to a Moslem woman because she was "too devout" (wearing a burka). Or, in the USA were many consider "being a Moslem" to be an appropriate criticism of a political candidate. It's all about prejudice.

30.       Roswitha
4132 posts
 17 Jul 2008 Thu 11:41 pm

Mosque Controversy in Germany

The Freedom to Practice One's Religion Is a Constitutional Right

Controversy reigns in debate over the building of Cologne's new mosque. If the majority population stands in the way of religious freedom, it must bear responsibility, too, for the failure of integration, says Peter Philipp

To build, or not to build – an increasing climate of anxiety over the influence of the foreign and foreigners has informed the debate about the building of Cologne's new mosque | There were no Muslims living in the local area when Prince Elector of the Palatinate Karl Theodor decided to build a mosque in the garden of his summer residence in the German town of Schwetzingen at the end of the 18th century. For him it was simply chic.

But now, it seems, chagrin has replaced chic as far as the citizens of modern day Cologne are concerned, with many up in arms over a proposal to construct a large mosque in their city. This, despite the fact the Rhine metropolis is home to around 65,000 Turks and the mosque is first and foremost intended for them.

A whole new dimension

So Cologne has joined other German cities such as Berlin and Munich where there have also been protests against the building of mosques.

In Cologne, however, the debate has taken on a whole new dimension. With local politicians having long since given the nod for construction work to begin, stirrings of unrest became apparent when the populist "Pro Cologne" group raised the temperature by claiming that a feeling of "alienation" would be engendered in the area of the city where the building was to be erected.

Then, of all people, the Jewish writer and journalist Ralph Giordano, usually a powerfully eloquent critic of intolerance and racism, joined the fray, his voice becoming the most prominent of those raised in opposition to the building. Most people, he thought, were against the building, but their opinions had not been asked.

"Human penguins"

In any case, integration had failed and the mosque would do as little to help it as the sight of what he rather crassly referred to as "human penguins".

"Usually a powerfully eloquent critic of intolerance and racism" – Ralph Giordano | If an educated man like Giordano can react in this way, one wonders just how deep-rooted such aversion and rejection might be among "ordinary" people. Some, it seems, have yet to grasp the fact that other religious communities exist besides those of the Christian churches, and that these are now a significant minority, in Germany as elsewhere, with all of the rights that a modern constitutional state confers upon its citizens.

The right to practice their religion in an appropriate place of worship and not in some dingy backyard, makeshift meeting rooms in the industrial suburbs being part of this.

The Mosque discussion is not to be confused with the debate about headscarves or about Muslim women's rights. Mixing these issues together is facile and such arguments tend to be laced with the sort of populist clichés that more readily win a sympathetic ear than outright rejection would do. No less absurd is the argument that the people have not been consulted.

"It takes two"

It is not the state but the religious community itself that is responsible for the building of places of worship in Germany. Of course, the usual planning procedures have to be gone through, but the people are not consulted on the building of Catholic or Protestant churches either.

This is part and parcel of religious freedom as it is practiced in Germany. Those who want this kind of decision to be made on the basis of a show of hands are certainly not doing democracy any favours. And when insult is added to intended injury we really have reached the bottom of the barrel. With the discussion reduced to such a level, the criticism that it is the immigrants who are resisting integration doesn't hold any water either.

It takes two to integrate. The majority population must want it as much as the immigrants. Those who refuse the right to freedom of religion are also refusing integration, and for that it is they who must bear the responsibility.

German Architect To Build Mosque
"Muslims Should Not Try to Hide"
In order to find an architect for their mosque, a Muslim community in Germany conducted an open tender process. Now the German non-Muslim Paul Böhm was awarded the first prize for his model. Thilo Guschas interviewed the architect.



Islam in Europe: An Interview With Arzu Toker on the Cologne Mosque
http://www.worldpoliticsreview.com/article.aspx?id=1037


http://www.qantara.de/webcom/show_article.php/_c-478/_nr-622/i.html?PHPSESSID=5

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