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Human Trafficking
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1.       alameda
3499 posts
 16 Dec 2009 Wed 11:01 pm

The other day when I was parking my car, I saw three young "ladies" on the corner of my block.  They were very young....I´d say they could have been 14  to 16 years old, maybe more.  They were dressed like little ladies of the night, and their actions weren´t much better,(shaking their bottoms at passing cars). Of courseI was very annoyed with this.  I really don´t want my block to have men driving by and picking up "ladies"....and going who knows where.  I sat in my car and watched them for a while, finally a someone they know with a car came and they all left in it.

 

This got me thinking about my response, and the situation of sex workers in general.  Who were these girls, what were they doing?  What could/should I have done?

 

CAST Report a Crime

 

Here is a video with statistics on the issue....most the numbers are from the US.  You have to sign in to see it.  It is very shocking video, be warned!

 

Human Trafficking video

 

Of course, not all trafficked people are in the sex trade, some make our garments, food, clean homes and a wide assortment of other activities, but most are in the sex trade.

 

What peverse person would want to indulge in this in any way?  ............reality of the situation....most of us are happy to get the "good" deals, cheap cloths, cheap goods. Nothing for nothing is a good rule to remember. All payment isn´t monetary.  The hardening of your heart is part of the price as well.  The one who dehumanizes becomes inhumane.

 

This organization seems pretty good....

 

CAST

 

Statistics

International

 •    An estimated 27 million people are enslaved around the world today – that’s more than the population of 18 States – or more than the population of New York and Virginia combined.


 
•    There are anywhere between 600,000 and 800,000 victims trafficked through international borders every year, which does not include the millions trafficked domestically within their own countries.  


•    It is the fastest growing criminal enterprise in the 21st century – a nine billion dollar industry.  

•    Trafficking ranks second, after drug smuggling and tying with arms dealing, in organized crime activities.


•    According to the 2008 Trafficking in Persons (TIP) Report, human trafficking is a multi-dimensional threat; it deprives people of their human rights and freedoms, it increases global health risks, and it fuels the growth of organized crime.

•    The majority of victims of slavery are women and children – traffickers prey on those who suffer most from macro factors like gender discrimination, family violence, and a lack of access to education and economic opportunity.

•    Although women and children make up a majority of trafficking victims, there has been an increase in the victimization of men as well.  Eleven percent of the victims CAST is serving are male.

 

National (USA)

 

•    According to CIA estimates, as many as 50,000 men, women and children are trafficked into The United States every year.  


•    The United States is one of the top three destination points for trafficked victims, along with Japan and Australia.  California, New York, Texas and Nevada are the top destination states in the country.

•    States such as California, Florida, New York, Nevada and Ohio are particularly vulnerable to human trafficking because of factors such as: proximity to international borders, number of ports and airports, significant immigrant population, and large economy that includes industries that attract forced labor.

•    Slavery and trafficking are not only limited to these states and can be found everywhere.  At the beginning of 2009, incidences of potential human trafficking were identified all over the country, including Ohio, Iowa, Washington, Florida, New York, Texas and Hawaii.

•    Los Angeles is one of the top three points of entry into this country for victims of slavery and trafficking. The diverse communities of this sprawling city make it easier to hide and move victims from place to place, making it very difficult for law enforcement to locate potential survivors.

•    Immigration agents estimate that 10,000 women are being held in Los Angeles´ underground brothels; this does not include the thousands of victims in domestic work, sweatshops or other informal industries.

•    Law enforcement in Las Vegas believes that trafficking and slavery in the “Sin City” has increased because of advertisements that encourage people to “sin all they can” while in Vegas – without anyone needing to find out.



Edited (12/16/2009) by alameda [add]

2.       catwoman
8933 posts
 17 Dec 2009 Thu 05:37 am

Thanks Alameda for this post.. my heart sinks when I see such things - not only when it´s related to sexual exploitation, but any exploitation and injustice.

The issue of human trafficking seems to me to be very much part of the general trend in which the west does "business" with underdeveloped, poor countries. Poor people are exploited in a huge variety of ways so that the westerners can have all that they can think of for cheap prices, without ever thinking about what it took to make the various products. 

 

However, obviously human trafficking is another level lower in this system. Truth is that people in the west are very much controlled with various forms of propaganda so that some people at the top can keep their fat profits. That is why pornographers are so powerful and any dissent is quickly squandered. They have all the support of other hugely profitable industries that are based on all kinds of inhumane principles... And since money rules, and there´s no real democracy, it´s hard to make any change.

 

I think that if there was any real democracy, the numbers you have quoted should be outraging enough to make people act.

3.       alameda
3499 posts
 17 Dec 2009 Thu 07:43 am

 

Quoting catwoman

Thanks Alameda for this post.. my heart sinks when I see such things - not only when it´s related to sexual exploitation, but any exploitation and injustice.

 

The issue of human trafficking seems to me to be very much part of the general trend in which the west does "business" with underdeveloped, poor countries. Poor people are exploited in a huge variety of ways so that the westerners can have all that they can think of for cheap prices, without ever thinking about what it took to make the various products.

 

Yes, I think we are numb to the reality of the situation. We think slavery ended, but, as we can clearly see, it is not over.......it goes on and on. 

 

There is no way a fair wage is being paid for a large percentage of what is sold in the US............we have all read the stories.....the constant search for cheap products....cheap labour.

 

Do the many people who love Walmart, ask why are those things so cheap?  People think paying $1,500 or $2,000. is a lot to pay for a Armani jacket....it isn´t.  That is just a fair price for the labor involved.  How many would pay that? 

 

When it´s cheap, ask yourself why? We need to look at where our things come from, what was the process in getting it to us?  We wouldn´t be in the situation we are in with global warmng, destruction of habitate, extinction of creatures if we thought about those issues.

 

The ultimate responsibility is in us.  How much are those things really worth to us, what do we really "need" to have a fufilled and meaningful life.

 

 



Edited (12/17/2009) by alameda [add]

4.       Pita
27 posts
 20 Dec 2009 Sun 10:49 am

western world is not the only place to blame for abuse of people seems to me it has been done for thousand of years when I study history and concubines and harems etc... And to be honest as far as children being exploited for child labor one has to ask who sold the child to this in the first place where are the parents???

 

Contrary to the old cliché, prostitution is almost certainly not the world´s oldest profession--that would be hunting and gathering, perhaps followed by subsistence farming--but it has been found in nearly every civilization on Earth stretching back throughout all recorded human history. We can say with some confidence that wherever there have been money, goods, or services to be bartered, somebody has bartered them for sex.

 

Turkey is one the most popular destinations in Europe for trafficked women from Ukraine and Russia. (Vladmir Isachenkov, "Soviet Women Slavery Flourishes " Associated Press, 6 November 1997)

Prostitutes are now commonly referred to as "Natashas" because so many come from Russia. ("´Invisible´ Women Shown In Russia´s Demographics," Martina Vandenberg, St. Petersburg Times, 13 October 1997)

Prostitute population

Ankara Chamber of Commerce (ATO) report(2004)[5]
Item  ↓ census data  ↓
The number of prostitutes 100,000
prostitutes are registered in 56 brothels operating 3,000
prostitutes registered with the police 15,000
women waiting to get licenses 30,000
age of prostitution between 15 and 40
annual turnover $3–4 billion

 

Prostitution in Korea takes on several faces including the massage parlours, barber shops, bars, brothels, room salons, juicy bars, turkish baths, strip clubs, etc, spread throughout the country. The job is moderately lucrative. According to a recent poll, 80% of women working in the entertainment industry in korea make between 3 and 5 million wons per month net income (3180$US - 5300$US per month), 7% make in excess of 5 million wons, and 13% make less than 3 million wons. The average salary of prostitutes is comparable to the one of korean engineers with 10+ year seniority or professors at public universities. According to the Korean Institute of Criminology, 20 percent of adult males aged between 20-64 purchase sex 4.5 times per month, spending a sum that breaks down to 154,000 wons (165$US) for each visit.

 

Prostitution in Germany is legal, and so are brothels.[1] In 2002, the government changed the law in an effort to improve the legal situation of prostitutes. However, the social stigmatization of prostitutes persists, forcing most prostitutes to lead a double life. Authorities consider the common exploitation of women from Eastern Europe to be the main problem associated with the occupation.

 

 

 

A survey conducted by Indian Health Organization of a red light area of Bombay shows:-

1. 20% of the one lakh prostitutes are children.
2. 25% of the child prostitutes had been abducted and sold.
3. 6% had been raped and sold.
4. 8% had been sold by their fathers after forcing them into incestuous relationships.
5. 2 lakh minor girls between ages 9yrs-20yrs were brought every year from Nepal to India and 20,000 of them are in Bombay brothels.
6. 15% to 18% are adolescents between 13 yrs and 18 yrs.
7. 15% of the women in prostitution have been sold by their husbands
8. Of 200m suffering from sexually transmitted diseases in the world 50m alone were in India.
9. 15% of them are devdasis

 IRAN

Even in IRAN
The 1925 Penal Code stated that prostitution was not a crime in itself, but that it was a crime to advocate it, to aid or abet a woman to enter prostitution or to operate a brothel. The current regime believes that execution - by firing squad or stoning - is a more fitting penalty. Execution is common. Some Iranian feminists regard mutïa, a form of temporary marriage where the woman has few rights, as akin to prostitution . Under mutïa, it is possible to be `married for as little as half an hour. Men who visit prostitutes simply marry them for a few hours and its totally legal in Iran.

Thailand
 Thailand has a very similar situation and has been known since the Vietnam war days as one of the best places in the world to go for great sexuality. For centuries brothels have just been an accepted part of the culture. Most Thai men got their first sexual education and experience in the local brothel. When sexwork became so popular when the U.S. military enjoyed their rest and relaxation stops in ports, for public relations purposes, Thailand made it officially illegal due to Western pressure, but the Entertainment Places Act and "special services" exempted most all of the sexwork for the military or tourists since it brings in so much cash. Consenting adult prostitution is illegal only officially in Thailand, not in practice.

The Philippines

The Philippines is a good Asian example, Technically prostitution is illegal but when it had U.S. military bases there was such a huge demand by U.S. military men for sex, it flourished. But to be politically correct, bargirls are "Customer Relations officers". They are required to have weekly STD checkups and quarterly HIV tests! But officially there are no barfines or sexworkers, just Guest Relationship Officers who are bargirls that have to carry government issued ID badges. Sexwork is an very big industry and supports many people especially in smaller cities like Angeles. Unless it involves children there is no enforcement and no legal risk for the bargirls or their customers. It´s just like secondary wives in much of Asia. It is simply accepted but often not publicly acknowledged.

And for $20-$30 barfine and maybe a $10 tip you have a very attractive happy bargirl who enthusiastically goes to your hotel for the night and is very happy with the arrangement. But that $40 cost in PI is equivalent to perhaps $400 in purchasing value in the U.S. since food, housing and all living costs are so much higher. So it is unfair to compare rates of American providers, living here with Asian providers. On the other hand it makes the travel costs very worthwhile, not only in cost but in attitudes of Asian vs. U.S. providers without worry about legal problems.

New Zealand

The Prostitution Reform Act 2003  made ALL adult prostitution and brothels a legal occupation in New Zealand but may have too many restrictions on brothels. In fact the government has online their "Brothel Operator Certificates." There are reasonable health and safety requirements such as using condoms, local bylaws can restrict signage and brothel locations, and a provision to outlaw pimping.

 

Brazil - Legal except brothels and pimping. In 2002 the Ministry of Labor added "sex worker" to an official list of occupations. Prostitution is not regulated in any way  (no licensing) but prostitutes can contribute can contribute to the official government pension fund and receive benefits when they retire. (Source Wikipedeia)

 

 

 

these are not the only places i found it everywhere the west, asia, middle east



Edited (12/20/2009) by Pita

5.       Deli_kizin
6376 posts
 21 Dec 2009 Mon 12:19 am

Generally I would enter such a discussion by stating that slavery, human trafficking and prostitution are not the same, but we would start the same discussions about this topic we had over and over again so I decided not to enter this discussion

teresa tazecan liked this message
6.       alameda
3499 posts
 21 Dec 2009 Mon 02:33 am

 

Quoting Deli_kizin

Generally I would enter such a discussion by stating that slavery, human trafficking and prostitution are not the same, ....................

 

I agree 100%, and may add that to paint them with the same brush does little but to diminish and  digress from the issues.

 

Trafficked humans are humans who can not benefit from their efforts, they have no choice in what they do, where they go, who they know.   Others profit from their work.  It can be picking lettuce, cleaning house, working in a garment factory, or being exploited as a sex worker.  Not all trafficked humans are used as sex workers, although many are.  IOW trafficked humans are used as a cheap expendable resource.

7.       Pita
27 posts
 24 Dec 2009 Thu 01:40 am

a few  things to say

one if children( manual labor ) are being used in the work force  one has to ask who is responsible for this - the child - the manufacturing company - the parents of the child or lastly the person who bought the product

and yes  there are many uneducated people who are working in low paying wage jobs and again I ask who do you blame the person who bought the item ( which kept the person in a job so that they can feed themselves) the company who pays them low wages i order to compete  or the goverment of that particular country for allowing those particular companies to operate there so that they can use underpaid workers

let me know and maybe we can solve this all

 



Edited (12/24/2009) by Pita

8.       ReyhanL
1961 posts
 24 Dec 2009 Thu 12:06 pm

Why nobody said here about prostitution in Turkey ? Nobody!

9.       alameda
3499 posts
 24 Dec 2009 Thu 07:03 pm

Maybe because this thread is not about prostitution, but human trafficking?  The two are not synonymous.

 

Quoting ReyhanL

Why nobody said here about prostitution in Turkey ? Nobody!

 

 

10.       alameda
3499 posts
 24 Dec 2009 Thu 07:18 pm

 

Quoting Pita

a few  things to say

one if children( manual labor ) are being used in the work force  one has to ask who is responsible for this - the child - the manufacturing company - the parents of the child or lastly the person who bought the product

 

Certainly not the child.  Who owns the manufacturing company?  IOW who determines the labour practices?  I think the ultimate responsibility is with the one who bought the product. Isn´t it our responsibility to know where the products we consume come from? In many places the one who steals and the one who buys stolen property share guilt.....then there is posession of stolen property.

 

and yes  there are many uneducated people who are working in low paying wage jobs and again I ask who do you blame the person who bought the item ( which kept the person in a job so that they can feed themselves) the company who pays them low wages i order to compete  or the goverment of that particular country for allowing those particular companies to operate there so that they can use underpaid workers

let me know and maybe we can solve this all

 

Yes, it is complicated....but the ultimate power is in the hands of the one who purchases the goods. No customer, no product.  Maybe we need to rethink what we need? Maybe we have become so distant from the production of goods that we have no way to evaluate the true value?



 

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