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Prophet Muhammad prohibited women to wear perfume outside their homes
(12 Messages in 2 pages - View all)
[1] 2
1.       Roswitha
4132 posts
 20 Aug 2008 Wed 04:55 pm

 
 
TURKEY: RELIGIOUS OFFICIALS CRITICIZED FOR STANCE ON WOMEN

 

 

Posted June 5, 2008 © Eurasianet

2.       doudi94
845 posts
 20 Aug 2008 Wed 05:14 pm

 

Quoting Roswitha

TURKEY: RELIGIOUS OFFICIALS CRITICIZED FOR STANCE ON WOMEN

 

"Women have to be more careful, since they possess stimulants," and they "have to be covered properly so as not to show their ornaments and figures to strangers."

Those are two of the controversial "dos" and "don’ts" given to Turkish women in the "Sexual Life" article that appeared last week on the website of Turkey’s Directorate on Religious Affairs, the Diyanet.

It added that if women have to communicate to the opposite sex they "should speak in a manner that will not arouse suspicion in one’s heart and in such seriousness and dignity that they will not let the opposite party misunderstand them."

Such proclamations about Muslim women and their behavior are part of a general catechism about Islam and society that the Diyanet publishes regularly.

But the Diyanet and its "Sexual Life" article have come under fierce criticism from Turkish secularists and feminist groups -- particularly as it equates flirting and dating to adultery and puts the responsibility for such things entirely on women.

The article also raised the ire of many Turks by warning that men and women not married to each other should not be seen together; discouraging women from working in mixed-gender workplaces; and claiming that it is "immoral" behavior for women to wear perfume outside the home.

Yusuf Kanli, a columnist with the pro-secular "Turkish Daily News," says the Diyanet’s stance on women s similar to the views of the Taliban regime in Afghanistan: "Putting on perfume is a sin. Flirting is an indecent attitude. A man and a woman’s going out together or walking in the street together is a sin."

The Diyanet was set up in 1924 and is a powerful institution that controls some 80,000 Turkish mosques -- appointing imams and drafting Friday Prayer speeches in a country where the constitution proclaims a separation between the state and religion.

Kanli tells RFE/RL that he finds it "incredible" that the state religious body issues a statement that "downgrades women and treats them as second-class citizens." He wonders how someone can "say something as ridiculous as this after 85 years" of secularism.

Kizbes Aydin, the head of the women’s cultural group Cigle Evka2, has gone further, saying that the Diyanet’s recommendation to separate men and women will incite violence against women.

Aydin was quoted as saying that religious authorities will "justify the implementation of violence [by a man against a woman] with excuses such as ’she was wearing perfume,’ or ’she was dressed provocatively.’"

On the use of perfume, the Diyanet’s article said, "Our Prophet Muhammad did not think well of women who wore perfume and fragrances outside their homes and went on strolls, and saw this as immoral behavior."

Experts on Islam and the Hadith -- which is a collection of reports on the sayings and deeds ascribed to the Prophet Muhammad -- question that statement.

Nahde Bozkurt, a professor of the divinity faculty at Ankara University, tells RFE/RL that wearing perfume is essential for Muslims. "As a modern woman, I use perfume in order [not] to smell bad because to smell good is very important in Islam," she says.

There is also a hadith by Imam al-Termezi that says anointing oneself with perfume is one of the traditions Muslims should follow.

Bozkurt says that even if it is true that the Prophet Muhammad prohibited women to wear perfume outside their homes, "we should take into account the circumstances and cultural, sociopolitical conditions of the seventh century when the Prophet Muhammad said or did certain things."

Creeping Islamization?

Kanli of the "Turkish Daily News" says the Diyanet’s article on women is the most recent sign of the government’s attempts to strengthen the role of Islam in Turkish society.

Turkey has seen something of a revival of Islam in recent years. The trend has become particularly clear since the Islamic-rooted Justice and Development (AK) party came to power in 2002.

The AK party has been criticized by secularist forces in Turkey that accuse the ruling elite of having a hidden Islamist agenda.

Earlier this year, state prosecutors asked Turkey’s Constitutional Court to ban AK for undermining the strict separation of religion and politics decreed in the country’s constitution in the 1920s.

The indictment against the party is based on the constitutional amendment initiated by AK and added earlier this year that allows students to wear head scarves while attending university. Prosecutors asked the court to bar Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, President Abdullah Gul, and dozens of other AK members from political activity.

On May 30, the case took a step forward when the prosecutor replied to the AK party’s initial defense. A decision on the case is expected in a few months.

The secularist opposition Republican People’s Party filed a separate case against the head-scarf amendment. The Constitutional Court is due to hear that complaint this week.

Referring to the wives of both Erdogan and Gul wearing head scarves, Kanli claims the "Islamization" of society as supported by the Turkish heads of state threatens the pillars of secularism and the republic itself.

"But, of course, if you have the first lady dressing up in an Islamic style -- [which is] incompatible with modernity -- if you have the prime minister’s wife [dressed] in the same fashion, and all ministers’ wives the same way, and if covering the head of a woman is a requirement for people to get appointed to senior government positions, or bureaucratic positions, we have a problem," he says.

"And that’s what we have in Turkey. It’s not about the turban at universities. It is a systematic move to Islamicize the state administration and a society in Turkey."

 

Posted June 5, 2008 © Eurasianet

 

WOW!!! thats a avery extremst way of thinking!!! like that lady said in the quote i wear perfume to smell nice because islam says to smell nice!!! long ago a lady couldnt go strolling around in the street, but now, its okay times have changed, alot of ppl take what the prophet said literally the stuff he did at his time,which were okay and acceptable! Take for example the beard issue, some ppl say ooh u cant shave!! the prophet had  a beard, well in his tome it was normal and actually the normal thing to ahve a beard(i dont think they had razors back then). And about men and women working in the same place, i think its okay and normal too, because agin times have changed and because i work in an office that has men in ti doesnt mean im gonna have an offidce affair with colleague!! And about it bringing the head scrf back to universities im not really aginst that coz theyre not forcing anyone to wear it theyre saying if u want to u can and that doesnt ahve anything to do with secularism i think, i think it will actually increase more women who wanted and wished to got o universities but couldnt because maybe thyre families force them to wear head csrf or they decided they wanna wear head scarf to go to school  its a good move taht will increase the number of women getting a higher education especially in rural areas(i think also) so in my opinion this article is a little extremist.!!

3.       Roswitha
4132 posts
 20 Aug 2008 Wed 05:20 pm

Of course it is, Doudi! Also food for thought instead of the continued  bashing and cat fighting among TLC members

4.       teaschip
3870 posts
 20 Aug 2008 Wed 05:43 pm

I´m glad at least people are speaking out towards such backward beliefs.

5.       tinababy
1096 posts
 20 Aug 2008 Wed 06:13 pm

Looks like I could be in serious trouble then!?!? One of the reasons I love Turkey so much is the tolerance shown for other people´s cultures and beliefs. I know I´m mainly in a very touristic area but I have travelled inland and to the east and have never felt criticisized - questioned yes, but not judged. I would hate to think Turkey was going to become more radical and judgemental.

Rise up ladies!!!

6.       Trudy
7887 posts
 20 Aug 2008 Wed 06:25 pm

Ooffff!! I´m bad (or bed?) in the eyes of these guys. I use perfume, I walk alone in the streets, I walk together with male friends (plural, yes) in the streets, I work in mix-gender workplaces sometimes even very next to males because I can´t explain and point them at texts at a distance, I invite males at my home for dinner or a drink and do much more ´awful´ things. {#lang_emotions_shy}{#lang_emotions_angel}

 

 

7.       tinababy
1096 posts
 20 Aug 2008 Wed 06:28 pm

 

Quoting Trudy

Ooffff!! I´m bad (or bed?) in the eyes of these guys. I use perfume, I walk alone in the streets, I walk together with male friends (plural, yes) in the streets, I work in mix-gender workplaces sometimes even very next to males because I can´t explain and point them at texts at a distance, I invite males at my home for dinner or a drink and do much more ´awful´ things. {#lang_emotions_shy}{#lang_emotions_angel}

 

 I wonder if they are the same "awful" things as mine???

8.       Trudy
7887 posts
 20 Aug 2008 Wed 06:31 pm

 

Quoting tinababy

 I wonder if they are the same "awful" things as mine???

 

 If you start confessing lol , I´ll say if it is what I meant, ok? lol 

9.       tinababy
1096 posts
 20 Aug 2008 Wed 06:41 pm

 

Quoting Trudy

 If you start confessing lol , I´ll say if it is what I meant, ok? lol 

 

 Confessing was never my strong point but suffice to say I think what I´m doing is ok and is not meant to offend anyone. I actually think there are cultural problems eg. I have been told I smile too much!! I actually try not to impinge on tradition and religious practices but believe that tolerance BOTH ways is best.

10.       Janette1169
92 posts
 20 Aug 2008 Wed 07:41 pm

Ooffff!! I´m bad (or bed?) in the eyes of these guys. I use perfume, I walk alone in the streets, I walk together with male friends (plural, yes) in the streets, I work in mix-gender workplaces sometimes even very next to males because I can´t explain and point them at texts at a distance, I invite males at my home for dinner or a drink and do much more ´awful´ things. {#lang_emotions_shy}{#lang_emotions_angel}

 

 I wonder if they are the same "awful" things as mine???

Quote

OOOH and i thought iwas behaving bad goin dancing with 2 Kurdish men  not alone of course with a friend! haha

 

When we all returned to our hotel , i was told off by a senior member of staff for goin to a bar with the 2 kurdish men, wondering if it was they were Kurdish i had this discussion with him, but thats another topic. He said it wasnt the right thing to do, so me been a lil outspoken told him, i go where i want with whom i want regardless of colour or race!!

 

Sadly we didnt go dancing again. they had to go to bed after their shift and i wasnt invited to that either tut tut lol.

 

Can i come to your house and do awful things pleassssseeeee haha

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