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Necla Kelek
1.       Roswitha
4132 posts
 26 Feb 2009 Thu 12:03 am

was born in Istanbul in 1957 and moved to Germany at the age of 10. Kelek studied economics and sociology in Hamburg and and conferred a doctorate on the subject “Islam in Every Day Life.” Her books include Die fremde Braut (The Foreign Bride) about arranged and forced marriages of Turkish migrants, which won the Geschwister-Scholl-Preis in 2005, and Die verlorenen Söhne (Lost Sons) about the sozialization, violence, and the faith of Turkish-Muslim men.
Mavi Boncuk |
December 05, 2005 |
The New Berlin Wall |New York Times

Happier without father / In a2006 interview with Michaela Schlagenwerth, Necla Kelek defends her critical depiction of the Turkish community in Germany

HERALD TRIBUNE INTERVIEW | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005
Necla Kelek, 49, best-selling author

Necla Kelek, 49, a Turkish-born German sociologist, thinks she was lucky to be born without good looks. "It meant I didn´t get married off, like the other Turkish girls," she said. "There were no bidders."

She found solace in school, but her life was bound by prohibitions: no swimming, no sports, no playing outdoors and no German friends because they were infidels. At age 17, Kelek could no longer bear it. She ran away the day her father threatened her with an ax.

Years later, she investigated the forced marriages of thousands of Muslim girls in Germany, many of them "imported" for that purpose.

Her book "The Foreign Bride" became an instant best seller this year and focused attention on a widely ignored issue. Up to 15,000 girls, many of them between 14 and 18 years old, are forced into marriage every year to Turkish boys living in Germany, Kelek said. The imported brides become the transmission belt for other relatives who join them in the name of "family reunion."

Often poor and uneducated, the "imported brides" are treated like domestic slaves in Germany, virtual property of their in-laws, Kelek writes. They stay in Turkish ghettos, inside their homes, cannot learn German and bring up their children in the same anti-German isolation. By importing brides, Turks in Germany perpetuate segregation and thwart integration, Kelek warns.

Her interviews with girls have prompted her to campaign for changes in the law, notably to require "imported brides" to be at least 21 years old, and preferably 24, as in Denmark and Sweden. She also calls for tougher sentences for "honor killings."

Putting the spotlight on the immigrant world has earned her wide praise in the German press, but a smear campaign in Germany´s Turkish newspapers.

"They said I was insulting Turkey and Islam," she said. But Kelek insists she criticizes not Islam but hypocrisy.

"Educated Turks, just like many Germans, close their eyes and say that imported brides are a private issue. It isn´t. It undermines the values of our own democracy. We European women are free to choose. But we accept the abuse of women in our midst supposedly because we must respect the customs of a different culture."

Kelek said she would not stop until the law changes. "The situation is sickening."

http://maviboncuk.blogspot.com/2007_03_01_archive.html




"

 

2.       thehandsom
7403 posts
 26 Feb 2009 Thu 12:18 am

 

Quoting Roswitha

was born in Istanbul in 1957 and moved to Germany at the age of 10. Kelek studied economics and sociology in Hamburg and and conferred a doctorate on the subject “Islam in Every Day Life.” Her books include Die fremde Braut (The Foreign Bride) about arranged and forced marriages of Turkish migrants, which won the Geschwister-Scholl-Preis in 2005, and Die verlorenen Söhne (Lost Sons) about the sozialization, violence, and the faith of Turkish-Muslim men.
Mavi Boncuk |
December 05, 2005 |
The New Berlin Wall |New York Times

Happier without father / In a2006 interview with Michaela Schlagenwerth, Necla Kelek defends her critical depiction of the Turkish community in Germany

HERALD TRIBUNE INTERVIEW | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005
Necla Kelek, 49, best-selling author

Necla Kelek, 49, a Turkish-born German sociologist, thinks she was lucky to be born without good looks. "It meant I didn´t get married off, like the other Turkish girls," she said. "There were no bidders."

She found solace in school, but her life was bound by prohibitions: no swimming, no sports, no playing outdoors and no German friends because they were infidels. At age 17, Kelek could no longer bear it. She ran away the day her father threatened her with an ax.

Years later, she investigated the forced marriages of thousands of Muslim girls in Germany, many of them "imported" for that purpose.

Her book "The Foreign Bride" became an instant best seller this year and focused attention on a widely ignored issue. Up to 15,000 girls, many of them between 14 and 18 years old, are forced into marriage every year to Turkish boys living in Germany, Kelek said. The imported brides become the transmission belt for other relatives who join them in the name of "family reunion."

Often poor and uneducated, the "imported brides" are treated like domestic slaves in Germany, virtual property of their in-laws, Kelek writes. They stay in Turkish ghettos, inside their homes, cannot learn German and bring up their children in the same anti-German isolation. By importing brides, Turks in Germany perpetuate segregation and thwart integration, Kelek warns.

Her interviews with girls have prompted her to campaign for changes in the law, notably to require "imported brides" to be at least 21 years old, and preferably 24, as in Denmark and Sweden. She also calls for tougher sentences for "honor killings."

Putting the spotlight on the immigrant world has earned her wide praise in the German press, but a smear campaign in Germany´s Turkish newspapers.

"They said I was insulting Turkey and Islam," she said. But Kelek insists she criticizes not Islam but hypocrisy.

"Educated Turks, just like many Germans, close their eyes and say that imported brides are a private issue. It isn´t. It undermines the values of our own democracy. We European women are free to choose. But we accept the abuse of women in our midst supposedly because we must respect the customs of a different culture."

Kelek said she would not stop until the law changes. "The situation is sickening."

http://maviboncuk.blogspot.com/2007_03_01_archive.html




"

 

 

 

Thanks for this Ros..

And that is why most of the time it is necessary to slam customs and traditions and anything comes with them..

3.       Roswitha
4132 posts
 26 Feb 2009 Thu 05:09 am

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