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Umarım Turkish ´I hope ...´ sentences
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1 [2]
10.       si++
3785 posts
 20 Jun 2009 Sat 09:09 am

You can use inþallah instead of umarým for almost all of them and it sounds better to me.

 

Quoting Henry

There are always a lot of ´I hope .....´ sentence requests, so I thought I would post this list as a possible help for learners.

The noun for hope is umut/ümit. The verb is ummak

´Umarým´ means ´I hope´ 

Umarým sen ve ailen iyisinizdir.

Sen ve ailen iyisiniz(dir), inþallah.

or

Ýnþallah, sen ve ailen iyisiniz(dir).

I hope you and your family are well.

Umarým iyisindir ve mutlusundur.

Ýnþallah iyi ve mutlusun(dur).

I hope you are well and happy.


Umarým kusura bakmazsýn.

Ýnþallah kusura bakmazsýn.

Kusura bakmazsýn inþallah.

I hope you don’t mind.


Umarým iyi bir gün geçirmiþsindir.

Ýnþallah iyi bir gün geçirmiþsindir.

Ýyi bir gün geçirmiþsindir inþallah.

I hope you have had a good day.


Umarým iyi bir hafta geçirmiþsindir.

Ýnþallah, iyi bir hafta geçirmiþsindir.

Ýyi bir hafta geçirmiþsindir, inþallah.

I hope you have had a good week.

 

Umarým iyi bir tatil geçirmiþsindir.

Ýnþallah, iyi bir tatil geçirmiþsindir.

Ýyi bir tatil geçirmiþsindir, inþallah.

I hope you have had a good holiday.


Umarým kendine iyi bakýyorsundur.

Ýnþallah, kendine iyi bakýyorsundur.

Kendine iyi bakýyorsundur, inþallah.

I hope you are looking after yourself.


Umarým yardýmcý olabilmiþimdir.

Ýnþallah, yardýmcý olabilmiþimdir.

Yardýmcý olabilmiþimdir, inþallah.

I hope I could help.


Umarým iyi bir yaz geçiriyorsundur.

Ýnþallah, iyi bir yaz geçiriyorsundur.

Ýyi bir yaz geçiriyorsundur, inþallah.

I hope you are having a good summer.


Umarým sizi rahatsýz etmiyorumdur.

Ýnþallah, sizi rahatsýz etmiyorumdur.

Sizi rahatsýz etmiyorumdur, inþallah.

I hope I’m not bothering/disturbing you.


Seni öpebileceðimi umarým.

I hope I can kiss you. 


En kýsa sürede görüþmeyi umarým.

En kýsa sürede görüþürüz, inþallah.

Ýnþallah, en kýsa sürede görüþürüz.

I hope to see you soon.


Yakýnda görüþeceðimizi umuyorum.

Ýnþallah, yakýnda görüþeceðiz.

Ýnþallah, yakýnda görüþürüzz.

Yakýnda görüþeceðiz inþallah.

Yakýnda görüþürüz inþallah.

I´m hoping we will see each other soon.


Umarým gelebiliyorsundur.

Ýnþallah, gelebiliyorsundur.

Ýnþallah, gelebilirsin.

I hope you can come.


Umarým iyi bir not alýrým.

Ýnþallah, iyi bir not alýrým.

I hope I get a good score/mark.


Seni göreceðimi ümit ediyorum.

Ýnþallah, seni göreceðim.

Seni göreceðim, inþallah.

I’m hoping I will see you.


Tekrar görüþmeyi umarým.

Tekrar görüþürüz, inþallah.

I hope to see you again.


Senden tekrar haber almayý umarým.

Senden tekrar haber alýrýz, inþallah.

Gene haberin gelir, inþallah.

I hope to hear from you again

 

Umarým senden tekrar haber alýrým.

Ýnþallah, senden tekrar haber alýrým.

I hope to hear from you again.


Umarým onu bulursun.

Ýnþallah, onu bulursun.

I hope you find it.

                        

Umarým öyle olur.

Ýnþallah, öyle olur.

I hope it will be like this.


Umarým senin beni mutlu edebildiðin kadar ben de seni mutlu ederim

I hope I make you as happy as you make me.        

Hiç umut yok

There´s no hope

 

 

 

If there are any errors please let me know.Smile

 

 

 

Lady_Geo liked this message
11.       Henry
2604 posts
 20 Jun 2009 Sat 03:12 pm

Thanks si++, I have some questions........

I have often seen inþallah used in ´I hope ....´ translations.

I see it translates to ´God willing, if God allows, and hopefully´ amongst other meanings.

Would  the person saying this, (or the person hearing this) need to be strongly religious for the use of inþallah

I ask this, as ´God willing´ is a rarely used expression in Australia, although ´thank God´ is still frequently used, even by non-religious people.  I am aware that inþallah, and other references to Allah, are frequently used in Turkish. Also when you write Allah, should it always be with a capital A?

Thanks for your (or anybody else´s) help in answering these questions.

12.       edith
171 posts
 20 Jun 2009 Sat 04:29 pm

Thank you Henry and si++ this is really helpful Flowers

13.       si++
3785 posts
 20 Jun 2009 Sat 08:08 pm

 

Quoting Henry

Thanks si++, I have some questions........

I have often seen inşallah used in ´I hope ....´ translations.

I see it translates to ´God willing, if God allows, and hopefully´ amongst other meanings.

Would  the person saying this, (or the person hearing this) need to be strongly religious for the use of inşallah

No, not at all. It´s a well accepted language construction. I don´t think of such a connection when I use it.

 

I had an atheist friend who used to say those words with "allah" in it more than most of the religious people I know. He used to say "bismillahirrahmanirrahim" just before taking his first step into an elevator for example.

I ask this, as ´God willing´ is a rarely used expression in Australia, although ´thank God´ is still frequently used, even by non-religious people.  I am aware that inşallah, and other references to Allah, are frequently used in Turkish. Also when you write Allah, should it always be with a capital A?

Yes/No

Yes when you refer to the God specifically.

Allah´a şükür = Thank God


No otherwise.

allahlık, allahtan, eyvallah, yallah etc.

Thanks for your (or anybody else´s) help in answering these questions.

 

 



Edited (5/26/2010) by si++

14.       Henry
2604 posts
 21 Jun 2009 Sun 02:16 am

Thanks for explaining this to me si++  Smile

15.       PELGIDIUM
64 posts
 21 Jun 2009 Sun 06:38 am

 

Quoting Henry

Thanks si++, I have some questions........

I have often seen inþallah used in ´I hope ....´ translations.

I see it translates to ´God willing, if God allows, and hopefully´ amongst other meanings.

Would  the person saying this, (or the person hearing this) need to be strongly religious for the use of inþallah

I ask this, as ´God willing´ is a rarely used expression in Australia, although ´thank God´ is still frequently used, even by non-religious people.  I am aware that inþallah, and other references to Allah, are frequently used in Turkish. Also when you write Allah, should it always be with a capital A?

Thanks for your (or anybody else´s) help in answering these questions.

 

Hi,

For your first question "no" inþallah is not used by only strongly religious people.It´s like saying "thank God, oh my God", I mean every people use this word and that doesn´t mean they are religious.But also frequently used by religious people,thats right.

Second questions answer is ; "no" you can´t write inþallah with capital "A".That word is comming from arabic language and including 3 words in-þae-Allah, normally "A" must be used but after so many years that 3 words became 1 word inþallah. If we write it with "A" it would be like "silverSmith"

 

You can see the meaning of inþallah word by word below;

in : þayet : if (ever)
þae : istemek,dilemek : to will, to wish
Ýnþallah: Allah isterse.

Hope that makes everything clear

Bye

 



Edited (6/21/2009) by PELGIDIUM [[spelling mistakes]]

Lady_Geo liked this message
16.       Henry
2604 posts
 21 Jun 2009 Sun 06:46 am

Thanks PELGIDIUM. 

I was wondering what words inþallah was derived from, and you have answered this.

So if I understand correctly you are saying:

in (Arabic) = þayet (Turkish) = if (ever)
sha / þae
(Arabic) = istemek, dilemek (Turkish) = to will, to wish
Ýnþallah
= Allah isterse  (if Allah wants, God willing, etc)  Big smile



Edited (6/21/2009) by Henry [added my variation]
Edited (6/21/2009) by Henry

17.       PELGIDIUM
64 posts
 21 Jun 2009 Sun 05:24 pm

 

Quoting Henry

Thanks PELGIDIUM. 

I was wondering what words inþallah was derived from, and you have answered this.

So if I understand correctly you are saying:

in (Arabic) = þayet (Turkish) = if (ever)
sha / þae
(Arabic) = istemek, dilemek (Turkish) = to will, to wish
Ýnþallah
= Allah isterse  (if Allah wants, God willing, etc)  Big smile

 

YES

 

18.       yanis76
11 posts
 01 Jan 2015 Thu 03:08 pm

I realise this is an old thread but can anyone explain why some of the phrases with with a -dir/-dır/-dur/-dür suffix and some don´t?

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