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More women in workforce?
(18 Messages in 2 pages - View all)
[1] 2
1.       thehandsom
7403 posts
 21 Sep 2009 Mon 09:06 pm

Turkey needs more women in workforce

...

Turkey needs to increase the proportion of women in the workforce in order to accelerate economic growth, according to a study by the World Bank and Turkey’s State Planning Organization.

 

Only 22 percent of Turkish women have jobs or are looking for work, World Bank economist Diego Angel-Urdinola said at a press conference in Istanbul Wednesday to preview the study. That’s lower than Iran or Afghanistan, and compares with an average of 62 percent in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, or OECD, the report said.

 

Women’s participation in the labor force has fallen in Turkey from 34 percent in 1988, while in the OECD it has been rising, according to the report. That’s happening even as

 

Turkish women get married later, have fewer children and reach higher education levels.

 

The main reason is that Turks have been migrating from rural areas, where women traditionally are involved in unpaid agricultural work, to cities where they’re more likely to stay at home, the report said.

 

Key obstacles to urban women finding jobs include cultural traditions that define women’s role as caring for children at home, as well as a lack of subsidized or affordable childcare and pre-school education, the study said.

 

Only about 30 percent of Turkish children aged between four and six were in education as of 2006, a level similar to sub- Saharan Africa, though the figure has probably risen since then, said Meltem Aran, a World Bank economist.

 

http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/....e-2009-09-16

....

It is simply quite dissapointing to be behind Iran and Afghanistan and quite worrying the percentage of women dropped from from 34% to 22% since 1988..

I guess in the end, We should somehow go through a huge dilemma at national scale, such as either ´economic prosperity´ or ´preserving the old values´ (as well as the security of male population)

2.       Elisabeth
5732 posts
 21 Sep 2009 Mon 10:27 pm

I don´t think we need more women in the workforce.....we need more men that can accomodate a lifestyle that we would love to grow accustomed to!  Owned

3.       mhsn supertitiz
518 posts
 21 Sep 2009 Mon 10:36 pm

 

Quoting Elisabeth

I don´t think we need more women in the workforce.....we need more men that can accomodate a lifestyle that we would love to grow accustomed to!  Owned

 

it`s hard to get why it`s considered so normal for women to exploit men financially. should we call you a dudette? Big smile

4.       Elisabeth
5732 posts
 21 Sep 2009 Mon 10:40 pm

 

Quoting mhsn supertitiz

 

 

it`s hard to get why it`s considered so normal for women to exploit men financially. should we call you a dudette? Big smile

 

 But you get our undying devotion.....it is hardly exploitation!  Flowers

5.       mhsn supertitiz
518 posts
 21 Sep 2009 Mon 10:47 pm

 

Quoting Elisabeth

 

 

 But you get our undying devotion.....it is hardly exploitation!  Flowers

 

Is this what your husband told you to have you marry him? <img src='/static/images/smileys//lol.gif' alt='lol'> (fast) duduism at its best!

 

6.       lady in red
6947 posts
 21 Sep 2009 Mon 11:32 pm

 

Quoting mhsn supertitiz

 

 

Is this what your husband told you to have you marry him? <img src='/static/images/smileys//lol.gif' alt='lol'> (fast) duduism at its best!

 

 

She gets his financial support - its HIM that gets her undying devotion - so to quote you that´s ´dudettism´ at it´s best!

7.       mhsn supertitiz
518 posts
 21 Sep 2009 Mon 11:37 pm

 

Quoting lady in red

 

 

She gets his financial support - its HIM that gets her undying devotion - so to quote you that´s ´dudettism´ at it´s best!

 

these dudu/dudette affairs are quite complicated. Big smile

8.       libralady
5152 posts
 22 Sep 2009 Tue 11:05 am

 

Quoting thehandsom

Turkey needs more women in workforce

...

Turkey needs to increase the proportion of women in the workforce in order to accelerate economic growth, according to a study by the World Bank and Turkey’s State Planning Organization.

 

Only 22 percent of Turkish women have jobs or are looking for work, World Bank economist Diego Angel-Urdinola said at a press conference in Istanbul Wednesday to preview the study. That’s lower than Iran or Afghanistan, and compares with an average of 62 percent in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, or OECD, the report said.

 

Women’s participation in the labor force has fallen in Turkey from 34 percent in 1988, while in the OECD it has been rising, according to the report. That’s happening even as

 

Turkish women get married later, have fewer children and reach higher education levels.

 

The main reason is that Turks have been migrating from rural areas, where women traditionally are involved in unpaid agricultural work, to cities where they’re more likely to stay at home, the report said.

 

Key obstacles to urban women finding jobs include cultural traditions that define women’s role as caring for children at home, as well as a lack of subsidized or affordable childcare and pre-school education, the study said.

 

Only about 30 percent of Turkish children aged between four and six were in education as of 2006, a level similar to sub- Saharan Africa, though the figure has probably risen since then, said Meltem Aran, a World Bank economist.

 

http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/....e-2009-09-16

....

It is simply quite dissapointing to be behind Iran and Afghanistan and quite worrying the percentage of women dropped from from 34% to 22% since 1988..

I guess in the end, We should somehow go through a huge dilemma at national scale, such as either ´economic prosperity´ or ´preserving the old values´ (as well as the security of male population)

 

 

 I always find these studies interesting.  When they say only 22% of women are in work what spectrum of work are they referring to?  I guess they mean in work in big cities and towns where they are recorded and the figure does not account for those who are working on the family farms gratis. Or is the 22% including the women who work on the land unpaid?  I am a little confused by this as where I was in Turkey recently it seemed that all the women were working and had the little children with them.  And children old enough (from about 10 upwards I would say) were also doing their bit.

 

I wonder what would and will happen to the rural life and the predominatly agricultural lifestyle of many Turks if they migrate into towns and cities looking for work.  Farms would not exist in Turkey if it were not for the family involvement.  I would also think that unemployment would rise in those cities/towns as there would not be enough work for everyone and with it already 15% or more in Turkey would cause more problems. 

 

Again, what does that 15% include?  That would be interesting to understand too.  (Not mentioned in this article)

 

As for children between 4 and 6 being in education, I would not have thought that was too unusual and I personally think 4 is too young for school and some European countries children do not start school until 5 or 6.  Now if the report was saying that 6 to 8 years old were not in school then that would be far more worrying.

 

But overall an interesting article.

9.       alameda
3499 posts
 22 Sep 2009 Tue 05:43 pm

 

Quoting libralady

 

 

 

 I always find these studies interesting.  When they say only 22% of women are in work what spectrum of work are they referring to?  I guess they mean in work in big cities and towns where they are recorded and the figure does not account for those who are working on the family farms gratis. Or is the 22% including the women who work on the land unpaid?  I am a little confused by this as where I was in Turkey recently it seemed that all the women were working and had the little children with them.  And children old enough (from about 10 upwards I would say) were also doing their bit.

 

I wonder what would and will happen to the rural life and the predominatly agricultural lifestyle of many Turks if they migrate into towns and cities looking for work.  Farms would not exist in Turkey if it were not for the family involvement.  I would also think that unemployment would rise in those cities/towns as there would not be enough work for everyone and with it already 15% or more in Turkey would cause more problems. 

 

++++++ Me too! I never saw any idle Turkish women anyplace I was.  They were all very busy.  I suppose they could be more "Western" and we could see more juvenile delinquents. when we visit Turkey.

 



Edited (9/22/2009) by alameda [add]

10.       teaschip
3870 posts
 22 Sep 2009 Tue 07:38 pm

 

Quoting thehandsom

Turkey needs more women in workforce

...

Turkey needs to increase the proportion of women in the workforce in order to accelerate economic growth, according to a study by the World Bank and Turkey’s State Planning Organization.

 

Only 22 percent of Turkish women have jobs or are looking for work, World Bank economist Diego Angel-Urdinola said at a press conference in Istanbul Wednesday to preview the study. That’s lower than Iran or Afghanistan, and compares with an average of 62 percent in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, or OECD, the report said.

 

Women’s participation in the labor force has fallen in Turkey from 34 percent in 1988, while in the OECD it has been rising, according to the report. That’s happening even as

 

Turkish women get married later, have fewer children and reach higher education levels.

 

The main reason is that Turks have been migrating from rural areas, where women traditionally are involved in unpaid agricultural work, to cities where they’re more likely to stay at home, the report said.

 

Key obstacles to urban women finding jobs include cultural traditions that define women’s role as caring for children at home, as well as a lack of subsidized or affordable childcare and pre-school education, the study said.

 

Only about 30 percent of Turkish children aged between four and six were in education as of 2006, a level similar to sub- Saharan Africa, though the figure has probably risen since then, said Meltem Aran, a World Bank economist.

 

http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/....e-2009-09-16

....

It is simply quite dissapointing to be behind Iran and Afghanistan and quite worrying the percentage of women dropped from from 34% to 22% since 1988..

I guess in the end, We should somehow go through a huge dilemma at national scale, such as either ´economic prosperity´ or ´preserving the old values´ (as well as the security of male population)

 

 If I remember correctly Turkish woman were told to have at least three children +....makes it a little difficult to find work and life balance with 3 or more kids.... It is quite disappointing to  see Turkey behind Iran & Afghanistan...

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