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Present Continuous (-ing)
1.       denizli
961 posts
 23 Feb 2014 Sun 12:26 am

Is there Present Continuous (-ing) in Turkish? Like: I am walking

If not, how do we say this, with şimdi?

2.       harp00n
3993 posts
 23 Feb 2014 Sun 12:18 pm

 

Quoting denizli

Is there Present Continuous (-ing) in Turkish? Like: I am walking

If not, how do we say this, with şimdi?

 

Şimdi or şu anda yürüyorum.

3.       denizli
961 posts
 23 Feb 2014 Sun 11:59 pm

Thanks.

I think for Present Continous in English, Turkish would use the Present Tense.

 

But in some cases for Present Tense in English, you would use Aorist (gelmez).

4.       Mushin
68 posts
 27 Feb 2014 Thu 07:35 pm

 

Quoting denizli

Thanks.

I think for Present Continous in English, Turkish would use the Present Tense.

 

But in some cases for Present Tense in English, you would use Aorist (gelmez).

 

Be  V+ing = V+(i)yor+Personal_Ending

I am walk-ing = yürü-yor-um

 

Sometimes English use present tense for Turkish cont. tense

I see = görüyorum

I understand = anlıyorum

I hear = duyuyorum

5.       denizli
961 posts
 28 Feb 2014 Fri 03:50 am

Isn´t it the other way around? English´s Present Continuous translates to Turkish Present Tense. I´ve never heard to a tense in Turkish being referred to as Present Continuous.

6.       gokuyum
5050 posts
 28 Feb 2014 Fri 06:27 pm

Geniş zaman = aorist tense

Şimdiki zaman = present continous tense

7.       Abla
3647 posts
 06 Mar 2014 Thu 12:47 am

Quote: denizli

English´s Present Continuous translates to Turkish Present Tense. I´ve never heard to a tense in Turkish being referred to as Present Continuous.

-(I)YOR is the marking of the continuous aspect in Turkish.

 

gidiyorum represents present tense only because there is no marking of past tense around (cf. gidiyordum). Present tense has no marking in Turkish (as in most languages I guess). What is often referred to as present tense markings are actually aspect markings.

 

There is no one-to-one correspondence between grammatical structures of different languages. Even though the English BE + -ING often equals to the Turkish -(I)YOR you cannot trust it always. For instance I have noticed that verbs of feelings, sensory perception and cognitive actions take the continuous aspect marking more often in Turkish than in English.

8.       denizli
961 posts
 06 Mar 2014 Thu 04:15 pm

Quoting Abla

 

-(I)YOR is the marking of the continuous aspect in Turkish.

 

gidiyorum represents present tense only because there is no marking of past tense around (cf. gidiyordum). Present tense has no marking in Turkish (as in most languages I guess). What is often referred to as present tense markings are actually aspect markings.

 

There is no one-to-one correspondence between grammatical structures of different languages. Even though the English BE + -ING often equals to the Turkish -(I)YOR you cannot trust it always. For instance I have noticed that verbs of feelings, sensory perception and cognitive actions take the continuous aspect marking more often in Turkish than in English.

 

Thanks everyone. Looks like a had this wrong (more-or-less). I always thought Şimdiki zaman was the present tense in English. First because it seems to be the first tense that is taught and second because it often used as the English present tense (I know - Bilyorum).

 

Also, many sites refer to Şimdiki zaman as "Present Tense", here is one: http://merhabaturkish.com/grammar/simple-present-tense/ although in another page (http://merhabaturkish.com/turkish-in-use/tenses-in-turkish/) it refers to it as "Simple Present – Present Continuous Tense".

I started getting confused on the issue when I learned of the wide tense, Geniş zaman.

So I agree, as Abla says, there is no one-to-one correspondence here.

When I learned Spanish, I noticed the main tense between Spanish and English lined up well. But then again I suppose that is different since both originate from Latin.

 

Is Geniş zaman used a lot? Or would people say "her zaman bilyorum"?

 

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