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someone, anyone in turkish
1.       raydin
135 posts
 06 Apr 2014 Sun 11:26 pm

How does one express the words:

 

anyone

someone 

somebody

like for exaple when you ask

does anyone know a good film to watch?

or can anyone help me?

or i will ask someone

or i will take it from someone

how do you translate these???

2.       olphon
106 posts
 12 Apr 2014 Sat 06:45 pm

I wrote on another thread but the same goes for you too:

"After you go beyond a certain level in a language, you´re lucky to find a one-to-one correspondence of anything. Everything that could be said is a huge surface and different languages cover it with different blankets of different sizes, differently. Furthermore, a correct translation of a correct translation does not always have to come back to itself."

 

 

So, let´s get to your questions.

anyone = biri, birisi, birileri, kimse, hiç kimse, herhangi biri, herhangi bir kimse ... maybe more

Despite all the years I was immersed in English, I have no idea whether there´s a difference between "someone" and "somebody". So, I´ll give translations for one of them.

someone =  biri, birisi, birileri, kimse, hiç kimse, herhangi biri, herhangi bir kimse

HAHAH, no difference

I can see a difference between "anyone" and "someone" though.

I believe I can better explain how to express the concepts of "anyone" and "someone" through example sentences.

 

 

does anyone know a good film to watch?

Now, first in English. What would change if I asked "does someone know a good film to watch?" Anyway. In Turkish it would be:

"İyi bir film bilen var mı?"

Where is "anyone" in this sentence? It is omitted. That´s the colloquial way of saying it. If you weren´t to omit that word the sentence would be:

"İyi bir film bilen biri var mı?"

"İyi bir film bilen birisi var mı?"

"İyi bir film bilen birileri var mı?"

"İyi bir film bilen kimse var mı?"

All are somewhat fine. But with "anyone" omitted, this sentence sounds much better.

 

 

"can anyone help me?"

or "Can somebody help me?" what´s the difference, really? Please explain if you know.

In Turkish it would be;

"Biri bana yardım edebilir mi?"

"Birileri bana yardım edebilir mi?

"Kimse bana yardım edebilir mi?" > sounds wrong to my Turkish ears, maybe %10 correct but overall wrong, I´d say.

 

You cannot omit "anyone" in this sentence. 

"Bana yardım edebilir mi?" > So very wrong.

Because in the preceding example there was a quality of "anyone"; namely knowing a good movie. But in this case, there´s no quality of the guy you want help from. You could omit, if he had a quality of, let´s say knowing Turkish:

"Türkçe bilen bana yardım edebilir mi?"

 

 

"i will ask someone" = "birine soracağım"

but definitely not "kimseye soracağım"

but "bir kimseye soracağım" would be correct, theoretically.

"i will take it from someone" = "onu birinden alacağım"

Same here. Don´t use "kimse"

 

 

I might have complicated matters, but it was to give you a better idea of how Turkish works. It seems to me that you´ll mostly be OK using "biri" for "anyone", "someone" and "somebody".

 

Let´s see further examples:

 

"Anyone in there?" would colloquially be "Orda kimse var mı?" But... You´ll get away with "orada biri var mı?"

 

 

"Anyone will do" (maybe you urgently need a janitor or something)

(also please note that "will do" does not mean that someone is doing something, it simply means "to be fine" and in Turkish "olmak" is used to express this)

"Herhangi biri olur."

In this case, "kimse olur" would be so very very wrong.

"Biri olur" would be much less wrong, but still wrong.

 

 

"When I grow up, I want to be somebody."

You see, this has a completely different meaning, thus in Turkish you wouldn´t use neither of "biri", "kimse", "herhangi biri"...

"İleride büyük bir adam olmak istiyorum." would be a translation I´d give.

 

 

Are you German? I hope you´re German.

tunci, raydin, Henry and Abla liked this message
3.       si++
3785 posts
 13 Apr 2014 Sun 12:15 pm

 

Quoting olphon

Now, first in English. What would change if I asked "does someone know a good film to watch?" Anyway. In Turkish it would be:

"İyi bir film bilen var mı?"

Where is "anyone" in this sentence? It is omitted. That´s the colloquial way of saying it. If you weren´t to omit that word the sentence would be:

"İyi bir film bilen biri var mı?"

"İyi bir film bilen birisi var mı?"

"İyi bir film bilen birileri var mı?"

"İyi bir film bilen kimse var mı?"

All are somewhat fine. But with "anyone" omitted, this sentence sounds much better.

 

 

 

Well,

 

If you happen to be visiting Istanbul by any chance, you´d probably end up in a ship travelling from Europe to Asia or vice versa. There you would see waiters with a lot of tea glasses on their trays and they would shout like this:

 

"Çay içen?" - "Is there anybody here who would like to drink a cup of tea?"

A lof of omissions.

tunci, raydin, elenagabriela, Henry and Abla liked this message
4.       raydin
135 posts
 15 Apr 2014 Tue 04:01 am

 

Quoting olphon

I wrote on another thread but the same goes for you too:

"After you go beyond a certain level in a language, you´re lucky to find a one-to-one correspondence of anything. Everything that could be said is a huge surface and different languages cover it with different blankets of different sizes, differently. Furthermore, a correct translation of a correct translation does not always have to come back to itself."

 

 

So, let´s get to your questions.

anyone = biri, birisi, birileri, kimse, hiç kimse, herhangi biri, herhangi bir kimse ... maybe more

Despite all the years I was immersed in English, I have no idea whether there´s a difference between "someone" and "somebody". So, I´ll give translations for one of them.

someone =  biri, birisi, birileri, kimse, hiç kimse, herhangi biri, herhangi bir kimse

HAHAH, no difference

I can see a difference between "anyone" and "someone" though.

I believe I can better explain how to express the concepts of "anyone" and "someone" through example sentences.

 

 

does anyone know a good film to watch?

Now, first in English. What would change if I asked "does someone know a good film to watch?" Anyway. In Turkish it would be:

"İyi bir film bilen var mı?"

Where is "anyone" in this sentence? It is omitted. That´s the colloquial way of saying it. If you weren´t to omit that word the sentence would be:

"İyi bir film bilen biri var mı?"

"İyi bir film bilen birisi var mı?"

"İyi bir film bilen birileri var mı?"

"İyi bir film bilen kimse var mı?"

All are somewhat fine. But with "anyone" omitted, this sentence sounds much better.

 

 

"can anyone help me?"

or "Can somebody help me?" what´s the difference, really? Please explain if you know.

In Turkish it would be;

"Biri bana yardım edebilir mi?"

"Birileri bana yardım edebilir mi?

"Kimse bana yardım edebilir mi?" > sounds wrong to my Turkish ears, maybe %10 correct but overall wrong, I´d say.

 

You cannot omit "anyone" in this sentence. 

"Bana yardım edebilir mi?" > So very wrong.

Because in the preceding example there was a quality of "anyone"; namely knowing a good movie. But in this case, there´s no quality of the guy you want help from. You could omit, if he had a quality of, let´s say knowing Turkish:

"Türkçe bilen bana yardım edebilir mi?"

 

 

"i will ask someone" = "birine soracağım"

but definitely not "kimseye soracağım"

but "bir kimseye soracağım" would be correct, theoretically.

"i will take it from someone" = "onu birinden alacağım"

Same here. Don´t use "kimse"

 

 

I might have complicated matters, but it was to give you a better idea of how Turkish works. It seems to me that you´ll mostly be OK using "biri" for "anyone", "someone" and "somebody".

 

Let´s see further examples:

 

"Anyone in there?" would colloquially be "Orda kimse var mı?" But... You´ll get away with "orada biri var mı?"

 

 

"Anyone will do" (maybe you urgently need a janitor or something)

(also please note that "will do" does not mean that someone is doing something, it simply means "to be fine" and in Turkish "olmak" is used to express this)

"Herhangi biri olur."

In this case, "kimse olur" would be so very very wrong.

"Biri olur" would be much less wrong, but still wrong.

 

 

"When I grow up, I want to be somebody."

You see, this has a completely different meaning, thus in Turkish you wouldn´t use neither of "biri", "kimse", "herhangi biri"...

"İleride büyük bir adam olmak istiyorum." would be a translation I´d give.

 

 

Are you German? I hope you´re German.

 

WOW! thank you for your detailed answer, it makes so much more sense to me. So I guess its much safer for me to most often use "biri". I always have such a hard time knowing how to express clauses like that, or to simply even say things like

"I´ll take both of them" or "the three of them are nice" 

also how do you guys say sentences like

"she was a nice person", "that person was nice", "turkish people are friendly", 

"the women that came the other day was nice" <--- "önceki gün gelen kadın tatlıdı " is that the correct translation

and sadly no im not German lol Im from Cali 

 

5.       raydin
135 posts
 15 Apr 2014 Tue 04:04 am

 

Quoting si++

 

 

Well,

 

If you happen to be visiting Istanbul by any chance, you´d probably end up in a ship travelling from Europe to Asia or vice versa. There you would see waiters with a lot of tea glasses on their trays and they would shout like this:

 

"Çay içen?" - "Is there anybody here who would like to drink a cup of tea?"

A lof of omissions.

 

I have toured the Bosphorus sea (hope I spelled the name right) and I´ve heard them shout that. makes sense now

6.       scalpel - -
203 posts
 16 Apr 2014 Wed 04:42 pm

 

Quoting olphon

 

does anyone know a good film to watch?

Now, first in English. What would change if I asked "does someone know a good film to watch?" Anyway. In Turkish it would be:

"İyi bir film bilen var mı?"

Where is "anyone" in this sentence? It is omitted. That´s the colloquial way of saying it. If you weren´t to omit that word the sentence would be:

"İyi bir film bilen biri var mı?"

"İyi bir film bilen birisi var mı?"

"İyi bir film bilen birileri var mı?"

"İyi bir film bilen kimse var mı?"

All are somewhat fine. But with "anyone" omitted, this sentence sounds much better.

 

-an/-en participle often tends to behave a bit like subject or object. For example, in the proverb "gelen gideni aratır" there is no omission. In such sentences -an/-en form of word is no more adjective but subject or object, and supposing there must be an omited noun modified by it is useless. In the sentence, "gelen" is subject and "giden" is object. As you may notice giden is suffixed by -i. needless to say that it is direct object in the sentence. Likewise, in the following sentences there is no omission: duyan duymayana anlatsın, iddiasını ispatlayamayan müfteridir, var mı bana yan bakan?.. I think, explaining it this way is simple and easier to understand for the learners.. in your sentence, "iyi bir film bilen var mı?" there is, in my opinion, no omited word either. That´s why you say, without  ´anyone´ it sounds much better". Yes, it does sound much better because there is no enough room for "biri" in the sentence!Wink

 

 

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