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Future tense
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1.       Kelebek84
8 posts
 11 Jan 2016 Mon 05:32 pm

Merhaba...


I have a question regarding the future tense.


I asked the admins the same, but nobody replied so I decided to post it here. Regarding the verb close - kapat... Why doesn´t word mutation occur? The correct form is obviously kapataca─č─▒m, but why isn´t it kapadaca─č─▒m? 


Te┼čekkür ederim!

2.       denizli
961 posts
 11 Jan 2016 Mon 08:49 pm

Yes, posting it here is the best, rather than sending a question to the Admin.

I didn´t realize this either. Maybe you need to remember them. If anyone has an answer, I´m curious too. 

 

 

3.       Kelebek84
8 posts
 11 Jan 2016 Mon 10:28 pm

It seems to me that the more I learn, the more confused I get.

Just as I think I´ve learned something, I come across an exception to the rule. However, when I know it is just an exception, I know I simply have to learn it by heart.

But if there is a rule, I want to know which one to apply and why.

I´ve also asked native speakers, but nobody gives me an exact answer. :/

 

4.       denizli
961 posts
 11 Jan 2016 Mon 11:52 pm

Yes Turkish has a lot of exceptions actually. But much less than English. Likely whomever you asked didn´t realize about this one.

I finally found a good answer. And actually isn´t related to future tense.

 

http://forum.wordreference.com/threads/seyretmek-and-other-t-d-verbs.1214952/

 

According to this no verbs follow this rule except:

1. etmek, and all products of it: seyretmek, affetmek, ahdetmek,....etc
2. tatmak
3. gitmek
4. gütmek

 

JNQ liked this message
5.       nativespeaker
13 posts
 12 Jan 2016 Tue 12:03 am

Merhaba,

Softening of consonant is only available for nouns. 

But there are 4 exceptional verbs; "git", "et", "tat", "güt"

If we add a vowel suffix these verbs, we must turn their last letter to "d".

For example; gidece─čim, edece─čim, tadaca─č─▒m, güdece─čim

Meanwhile, there are some exceptional nouns.

We must keep the same most of monosyllabic nouns with vowel suffixes;

For example;

top > topa

koç > koçum

dut > dutu

We must keep the same some nouns with vowel suffixes that are transferred to Turkish from other foreign languages.

For example;

bisiklet > bisikleti

hukuk > hukuku

kart > karta

ahret > ahreti


Edited (1/12/2016) by nativespeaker [I added "g├╝tmek" verb]

6.       Kelebek84
8 posts
 12 Jan 2016 Tue 10:51 am

Te┼čekkürler to both of you!

I didn´t realize that the word mutation occurs only with nouns, as it is not explained in the lessons. It says "WORD (not noun) has to end with p, ç, t, k..." so thank you for clearing that up.

7.       Kelebek84
8 posts
 12 Jan 2016 Tue 12:33 pm

One more thing from the excercises...

The sentence goes like this:

"Ben Ankara´y─▒ sevmiyorum."

The question is which verb was used?

I wrote "sevmemek" but they corrected me and said it is "sevmek".

How can this be when they are verbs of completely opposite meanings.

Wouldn´t the sentence with "sevmek" go like this:

"Ben Ankara´yi seviyorum."

 

 

8.       nativespeaker
13 posts
 12 Jan 2016 Tue 01:47 pm

 

Quoting Kelebek84

One more thing from the excercises...

The sentence goes like this:

"Ben Ankara´y─▒ sevmiyorum."

The question is which verb was used?

I wrote "sevmemek" but they corrected me and said it is "sevmek".

How can this be when they are verbs of completely opposite meanings.

Wouldn´t the sentence with "sevmek" go like this:

"Ben Ankara´yi seviyorum."

 

 

 

sevmek - love

sevmemek - don´t love

Word root is "sevmek". "sev-me-mek" is negative form of "sevmek" that is created using the negative suffix "-me".

 

Teacher meant "sevmemek" can´t be a word root. Verb is "sevmek" and "sevmemek" is negative form of "sevmek" verb.



Edited (1/12/2016) by nativespeaker
Edited (1/12/2016) by nativespeaker

9.       Kelebek84
8 posts
 12 Jan 2016 Tue 01:59 pm

I understand the suffix -me is added for a negative meaning and I thought it was "sevmek", but I went to look it up anyway in the dictionary on this site and it was there on its own as a verb "sevmemek - to dislike".

I think they shouldn´t have put it on its own then, they should have listed it under "sevmek" and just write the meaning next to it.

Or they should just be more explicit in the excercises, they should have asked to choose the correct verb root then.

I know I´m splitting hairs now, but it is confusing for beginners and perfectionists like me.

Te┼čekkür ederim!



Edited (1/12/2016) by Kelebek84
Edited (1/12/2016) by Kelebek84
Edited (1/12/2016) by Kelebek84

10.       denizli
961 posts
 12 Jan 2016 Tue 04:31 pm

 

Quoting Kelebek84

...

I know I´m splitting hairs now, but it is confusing for beginners and perfectionists like me.

Te┼čekkür ederim!

 

I wouldn´t worry - both are correct. It´s like what is the verb from ´disliked´? You could either say ´to like´ or ´to dislike´.

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