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Earthquake in England
(20 Messages in 2 pages - View all)
1 [2]
10.       alameda
3499 posts
 27 Feb 2008 Wed 07:44 pm

Quoting thehandsom:

Quoting alameda:


In some ways you are in a more dangerous situation seeing as in your area earthquakes are not expected, they are not considered in building or general emergency preparedness.


But alameda,
They dont need to be ready because UK is not on the fault!!



The problem is, they had an earthquake anyway. It makes me realize they really know about all the faults.

There was an earthquake in New York about 15 years ago, but they didn't know they were near a fault. Sometimes they are dormant for years.

"According to experts, an old fault zone that could have remained dormant for hundreds of millions years could be to blame for the latest earthquake. "

Britain counting cost of largest earthquake since 1984

Given the fact that earthquake prediction is not an exact science, being prepared would seem to be a good idea.

11.       alameda
3499 posts
 27 Feb 2008 Wed 07:52 pm

Interesting article on fault reactivation...maybe long, but interesting.

Fault reactivation in North Sea

Geology; July 2000; v. 28; no. 7; p. 595-598; DOI:
2000 Geological Society of America

Fault reactivation and fluid flow along a previously dormant normal fault in the northern North Sea
David Wiprut1 and Mark D. Zoback1
1 Department of Geophysics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-2215, USA

Detailed seismic imaging and in situ stress and pore-pressure measurements are used to analyze reverse-fault reactivation of a long-dormant normal fault in the northern North Sea. Fault reactivation is caused by three factors: (1) a recent increase in the compressional stress in the area associated with postglacial rebound, (2) locally elevated pore pressure due to the presence of natural gas in a hydrocarbon reservoir on the footwall side of the fault, and (3) a fault orientation that is nearly optimally oriented for frictional slip in the present-day stress field. We demonstrate that the combination of these three factors induces fault slippage and gas leakage along sections of the previously sealing reservoir-bounding fault. We argue that similar pore-pressure triggering of fault slip in the crust may occur because of the accumulation of gas columns of, e.g., CO2 and He in the vicinity of tectonic faults.

12.       thehandsom
7403 posts
 27 Feb 2008 Wed 10:51 pm

Quoting alameda:

Quoting thehandsom:

Quoting alameda:


In some ways you are in a more dangerous situation seeing as in your area earthquakes are not expected, they are not considered in building or general emergency preparedness.


But alameda,
They dont need to be ready because UK is not on the fault!!



The problem is, they had an earthquake anyway. It makes me realize they really know about all the faults.

There was an earthquake in New York about 15 years ago, but they didn't know they were near a fault. Sometimes they are dormant for years.

"According to experts, an old fault zone that could have remained dormant for hundreds of millions years could be to blame for the latest earthquake. "

Britain counting cost of largest earthquake since 1984

Given the fact that earthquake prediction is not an exact science, being prepared would seem to be a good idea.


Alameda,
I think i have to change my statement. When I said uk is not on the fault is a bit misleading. What I wanted to say was 'in the uk there are fault lines but not like the ones you see in california'.
The fault lines in the uk wont create huge earthquakes like it happened in pakistan or turkey.

So they dont need to prepare themselves!!

As far as earthquake prediction is concerned, yes..the predicting the time of earthquakes may not be very accurate but apart from that, what needs to be known is prety much known.

13.       bjk
166 posts
 27 Feb 2008 Wed 11:52 pm

Quoting thehandsom:

As far as earthquake prediction is concerned, yes..the predicting the time of earthquakes may not be very accurate but apart from that, what needs to be known is prety much known.



"May not be very accurate" is a slight understatement! And "what needs to be known is pretty much known" is rubbish. Seismologists have no real idea at all when quakes will occur! They can monitor the stress in rocks and can make vague predictions but it's not all that reliable. Prime example is Parkfield, California....

14.       thehandsom
7403 posts
 28 Feb 2008 Thu 01:06 am

Quoting bjk:

Quoting thehandsom:

As far as earthquake prediction is concerned, yes..the predicting the time of earthquakes may not be very accurate but apart from that, what needs to be known is prety much known.



"May not be very accurate" is a slight understatement! And "what needs to be known is pretty much known" is rubbish. Seismologists have no real idea at all when quakes will occur! They can monitor the stress in rocks and can make vague predictions but it's not all that reliable. Prime example is Parkfield, California....


bjk what I said was, "predicting the timing of earthquakes are not very accurate"..
But apart from that..the science is able to tell us all:
ie where, what force etc. as well as how to take the necessary precautions.

15.       bjk
166 posts
 28 Feb 2008 Thu 01:36 am

Quoting thehandsom:

Quoting bjk:

Quoting thehandsom:

As far as earthquake prediction is concerned, yes..the predicting the time of earthquakes may not be very accurate but apart from that, what needs to be known is prety much known.



"May not be very accurate" is a slight understatement! And "what needs to be known is pretty much known" is rubbish. Seismologists have no real idea at all when quakes will occur! They can monitor the stress in rocks and can make vague predictions but it's not all that reliable. Prime example is Parkfield, California....


bjk what I said was, "predicting the timing of earthquakes are not very accurate"..
But apart from that..the science is able to tell us all:
ie where, what force etc. as well as how to take the necessary precautions.



True, I don't understand why seismologists even bother trying to predict them. Mitigation is the better option.

16.       peacetrain
1905 posts
 28 Feb 2008 Thu 06:39 am

Regarding earthquakes in Turkey, I watched a BBC documentary a couple of weeks ago and a reference was made to the Anatolian fault line. A great deal of research has been carried out (re. stress lines and earthquake storms) and from this the experts have been able to make accurate predictions as to the location of the next earthquake on this fault line. I think they also came up with a fairly consistent time elapse between each quake but I may be wrong about that. I'm sure it is common knowledge that the prediction is that Istanbul is the next earthquake location and it is fairly imminent.

These links don't relate to the documentary I watched but they are still interesting:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/horizon/2003/earthquakestorms.shtml

http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/horizon/2003/earthquakestormsqa.shtml

17.       bjk
166 posts
 28 Feb 2008 Thu 10:44 am

Quoting peace train:

Regarding earthquakes in Turkey, I watched a BBC documentary a couple of weeks ago and a reference was made to the Anatolian fault line. A great deal of research has been carried out (re. stress lines and earthquake storms) and from this the experts have been able to make accurate predictions as to the location of the next earthquake on this fault line. I think they also came up with a fairly consistent time elapse between each quake but I may be wrong about that. I'm sure it is common knowledge that the prediction is that Istanbul is the next earthquake location and it is fairly imminent.

These links don't relate to the documentary I watched but they are still interesting:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/horizon/2003/earthquakestorms.shtml

http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/horizon/2003/earthquakestormsqa.shtml



Ok yea it's true about the time lapses But it's unbelievably unreliable. There was something called the Parkfield experiment and scientists worked out that an earthquake should occur around 1993, but it didn't happen until 2004!

18.       libralady
5152 posts
 28 Feb 2008 Thu 07:21 pm

Quoting alameda:

Quoting thehandsom:

Quoting alameda:


In some ways you are in a more dangerous situation seeing as in your area earthquakes are not expected, they are not considered in building or general emergency preparedness.


But alameda,
They dont need to be ready because UK is not on the fault!!



The problem is, they had an earthquake anyway. It makes me realize they really know about all the faults.

There was an earthquake in New York about 15 years ago, but they didn't know they were near a fault. Sometimes they are dormant for years.

"According to experts, an old fault zone that could have remained dormant for hundreds of millions years could be to blame for the latest earthquake. "

Britain counting cost of largest earthquake since 1984

Given the fact that earthquake prediction is not an exact science, being prepared would seem to be a good idea.



I notice the link you have added about the cost of the earthquake. People are coming out in their droves to claim from their home insurance for "damage", when really a few chimneys and roofs were damaged. I saw a headline in London today "Earthquake Rocks London" - how about that for senstionalism!

19.       Elisabeth
5732 posts
 28 Feb 2008 Thu 08:23 pm

Oh dear, LL, everyone in England will have to brace themselves for their home insurance rates to skyrocket now!!
I had an experience a few years about with all the hurricanes in the Gulf Coast region...my home insurance doubled even though none of them hit anywhere near me....I just live in the region!!

20.       libralady
5152 posts
 01 Mar 2008 Sat 07:14 pm

Quoting Elisabeth:

Oh dear, LL, everyone in England will have to brace themselves for their home insurance rates to skyrocket now!!
I had an experience a few years about with all the hurricanes in the Gulf Coast region...my home insurance doubled even though none of them hit anywhere near me....I just live in the region!!



For insurance purposes we have what is called a "Postcode Lottery" meaning that if you live in high risk areas then you pay more, at the moment just flood (natural disasters) but also where there is high theft, but I am sure they will come up with an earthquake postcode lottery!

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