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ALL-TIME BEST NOVELS
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1.       yilgun-7
1326 posts
 02 Nov 2008 Sun 04:24 am

1- Victor Hugo                           Les Miserables 

2- Fyoder Dostoyevsky               Crime and Punishment    

                                                The Brothers Karamozof

3-Leo Tolstoy                             War and Peace

                                                Anna Karenina 

4-Jane Austen                            Pride and Prejude 

5-James Joyce                           Ulysses

6- Franz Kafka                            Die Verwandlung

                                                The trial

7-Viginia Wolf                            The Waves  

8- Upton Sinclair                        Oil 

9 –James Baldwin                      Go Tell it on the Mountain

10-Albert Camus                        The Stranger

11-John Steinbeck                      The Grapes of Wrath 

                                                Of Mice and Men

12-Ernest Hemingway                The Snows of Kilimanjora

                                                The Old Man and the Sea 

                                                The Sun Also Rises          

13 – Yaþar Kemal                       Aðrýdaðý ( Aðrý Daðý) Efsanesi 
14-   Paul Auster                        Timbuktu

15- Robert Stone                        Dog Soldiersl

16- John Cheever                       Falconer

17- Gabriel Garcia Marquez         One Hundred Years Solutude

18- Vladimir Nabokov                 Lolita 

19- Jean Paul Sartre                   Les Mots

20- Virginia Woolf                     To the lighthouse

                                               Mrs.Dalloway    

21- William Faulkner                  Light in August

                                               The Sound and The Fury

22- Knut Hamsun                      Victoria

23- Graham Green                    The Power and the Glory

                                               The Hearth of the Matter     

 24- Saul Bellow                        Herzog

 25- Henry Miller                       Tropic of Cancer

 26- Doris Lessing                     The Golden Notebook

 27- Toni Morrison                    Beloved

 28- George Orwell                   Animal Firm

 29-F.Scott Fitzgerald                The Great Gatsby

 30- Margaret Mitchell                Gone With the Wind        

 31-Yusuf Atýlgan                      Aylak Adam

 32-Antoine de Saint-Exupery     Le Petit Prince

 33-Benjamin Constant               Adolphe

 

P.S.

-  “Ulyses by James Joyce (1922)  was selected the best novel of the century by TIME Magazine (U.S.A.), (200.

Runners-up : One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez; Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov.

-  This is my own private list according to my private world literature study.

2.       thehandsom
7403 posts
 02 Nov 2008 Sun 05:21 am

can somebody tell me how Jane Austen   (Pride and Prejud) made into that list?

(I read the book, watched the movie several times and still strying to figure out the ´moral of the story´ ) 

3.       peacetrain
1905 posts
 02 Nov 2008 Sun 08:26 am

 

Quoting thehandsom

can somebody tell me how Jane Austen   (Pride and Prejud) made into that list?

(I read the book, watched the movie several times and still strying to figure out the ´moral of the story´ ) 

 

 How about: Proud and prejudicial characteristics get one  nowhere in the love stakes, especially if one listen´s to hearsay .  

 

 Phew . . . Elizabeth almost missed out on her destiny . . . the love of a fine figure of a man in breeches.

 

Of course, if you had done your research more thoroughly, you would have also read and watched Bridget Jones´s Diary and realised the modern  moral: Never let a cad twang your big knickers.

 

 

Colin Firth took the role of Darcy in both stories. For those of you who don´t know who he is, he seems to be "the thinking woman´s crumpet".  Something for you to aspire to Thehandsom? 

4.       lady in red
6947 posts
 02 Nov 2008 Sun 11:54 am

 

Quoting yilgun-7

1- Victor Hugo                           Les Miserables 

2- Fyoder Dostoyevsky               Crime and Punishment    

                                                The Brothers Karamozof

3-Leo Tolstoy                             War and Peace

                                                Anna Karenina 

4-Jane Austen                            Pride and Prejude 

5-James Joyce                           Ulysses

6- Franz Kafka                            Die Verwandlung

                                                The trial

7-Viginia Wolf                            The Waves  

8- Upton Sinclair                        Oil 

9 –James Baldwin                      Go Tell it on the Mountain

10-Albert Camus                        The Stranger

11-John Steinbeck                      The Grapes of Wrath 

                                                Of Mice and Men

12-Ernest Hemingway                The Snows of Kilimanjora

                                                The Old Man and the Sea 

                                                The Sun Also Rises          

13 – Yaþar Kemal                       Aðrýdaðý Efsanesi 
14-   Paul Auster                        Timbuktu

15- Robert Stone                        Dog Soldiersl

16- John Cheever                       Falconer

17- Gabriel Garcia Marquez         One Hundred Years Solutude

18- Vladimir Nabokov                 Lolita 

19- Jean Paul Sartre                   Les Mots

20- Virginia Woolf                     To the lighthouse

                                               Mrs.Dalloway    

21- William Faulkner                  Light in August

                                               The Sound and The Fury

22- Knut Hamsun                      Victoria

23- Graham Green                    The Power and the Glory

                                               The Hearth of the Matter     

 24- Saul Bellow                        Herzog

 25- Henry Miller                       Tropic of Cancer

 26- Doris Lessing                     The Golden Notebook

 27- Toni Morrison                    Beloved

 28- George Orwell                   Animal Firm

 29-F.Scott Fitzgerald                The Great Gatsby

 30- Margaret Mitchell                Gone With the Wind        

 

 

P.S.

“Ulyses by James Joyce (1922)  was selected the best novel of the century by TIME Magazine (U.S.A.), (200.

Runners-up : One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez; Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov.

 

I note the order of preference has changed a bit since you last posted this topic!

 

 http://www.turkishclass.com/forumTitle_27996

 

 

5.       lesluv
722 posts
 02 Nov 2008 Sun 12:47 pm

 

 

 

 

Colin Firth took the role of Darcy in both stories. For those of you who don´t know who he is, he seems to be "the thinking woman´s crumpet".  Something for you to aspire to Thehandsom? 

 

 swoon he (colin) can be my Mr Darcy any day

6.       TheAenigma
5001 posts
 02 Nov 2008 Sun 12:51 pm

 

Quoting lesluv

 swoon he (colin) can be my Mr Darcy any day

 

 Ouuhhhh ben de! Wet Darcy straight from the lake....... definitely sapik enough for SS

7.       lesluv
722 posts
 02 Nov 2008 Sun 12:54 pm

 

Quoting TheAenigma

 Ouuhhhh ben de! Wet Darcy straight from the lake....... definitely sapik enough for SS

 

 perhaps we can ask him to be spokesperson for the SS

 

 

lesluv

Resident TC sapik, founder member of SS and Mr Darcy´s lover

8.       TheAenigma
5001 posts
 02 Nov 2008 Sun 12:56 pm

 

Quoting lesluv

 perhaps we can ask him to be spokesperson for the SS

 

 

lesluv

Resident TC sapik, founder member of SS and Mr Darcy´s lover

 

Will you write to him or I?

 

AENIGMA

"Our very young and intelligent” and sublimely beautiful, sapik founder member of SS and Mr. Darcy´s preferred lover but misleadingly steam cleaned sister from Neverland

9.       lesluv
722 posts
 02 Nov 2008 Sun 03:00 pm

 

Quoting TheAenigma

Will you write to him or I?

 

AENIGMA

"Our very young and intelligent” and sublimely beautiful, sapik founder member of SS and Mrs. Darcy´s profiterole lover but misleadingly steamy cleaning lady from NeverNeverland

 

 oh darling..... no need to write,  i´ll see him tonight!!!{#lang_emotions_wink}

 

lesluv

resident TC sapik, founder member of SS, Mr Darcy´s only lover, chief spam generator

10.       thehandsom
7403 posts
 02 Nov 2008 Sun 03:00 pm

 

Quoting lesluv

swoon he (colin) can be my Mr Darcy any day

 

yuuuck {#lang_emotions_puking}

11.       lesluv
722 posts
 02 Nov 2008 Sun 03:02 pm

 

Quoting thehandsom

yuuuck {#lang_emotions_puking}

 

 not your type then{#lang_emotions_lol}

12.       thehandsom
7403 posts
 02 Nov 2008 Sun 03:04 pm

 

Quoting lesluv

not your type then{#lang_emotions_lol}

 

if Colin is your type, I dont think you and I can get on well..{#lang_emotions_razz}

13.       lesluv
722 posts
 02 Nov 2008 Sun 03:06 pm

 

Quoting thehandsom

if Colin is your type, I dont think you and I can get on well..{#lang_emotions_razz}

 

 what a terrible shame and i´ve heard such nice things about you{#lang_emotions_satisfied_nod}

14.       libralady
5152 posts
 02 Nov 2008 Sun 03:08 pm

 

Quoting TheAenigma

 Ouuhhhh ben de! Wet Darcy straight from the lake....... definitely sapik enough for SS

 

 Agree!  He is far to wet and defintely not naughty enough for me !! {#lang_emotions_rolleyes}

15.       lesluv
722 posts
 02 Nov 2008 Sun 03:11 pm

 

Quoting libralady

 Agree!  He is far to wet and defintely not naughty enough for me !! {#lang_emotions_rolleyes}

 

 ooooh young lady.... definately a contender for the SS

16.       Trudy
7887 posts
 02 Nov 2008 Sun 05:00 pm

 

Quoting lesluv

 what a terrible shame and i´ve heard such nice things about you{#lang_emotions_satisfied_nod}

 

 lol lol lol

17.       Daydreamer
3743 posts
 02 Nov 2008 Sun 07:27 pm

 

Quoting lady in red

I note the order of preference has changed a bit since you last posted this topic!

 

 http://www.turkishclass.com/forumTitle_27996

 

comment removed  *washing my mouth with soap*

18.       libralady
5152 posts
 02 Nov 2008 Sun 07:41 pm

 

Quoting Daydreamer

lol I´ve always thought that Yilgun´s posts are so daft because he´s very young and inexperienced. Now I´m beginning to wonder if he´s not senile and demented lol

 

 I take objection to this comment and would be grateful if you would delete the last offensive sentance and please dont say you are joking as this is a subject that is not funny.

19.       ciko
784 posts
 02 Nov 2008 Sun 11:54 pm

i would definitely add

 

Jose Saramagos´s "blindness"

Paul Auster´s "the book of illusions"

J.D Salinger´s "the catcher in the rye" 

20.       TheAenigma
5001 posts
 02 Nov 2008 Sun 11:58 pm

 

Quoting ciko

i would definitely add

 

 

J.D Salinger´s "the catcher in the rye" 

 

 I know that I SHOULD love Catcher in the Rye, but is it ok that I don´t? 

Am I alone in this thought?

21.       lesluv
722 posts
 03 Nov 2008 Mon 12:17 am

i am embarassed to say that i have only read a few of these novels!!  makes my christmas list easy though{#lang_emotions_rolleyes}

22.       CANLI
5084 posts
 03 Nov 2008 Mon 02:47 am

 

Quoting peacetrain

 How about: Proud and prejudicial characteristics get one  nowhere in the love stakes, especially if one listen´s to hearsay .  

 

 Phew . . . Elizabeth almost missed out on her destiny . . . the love of a fine figure of a man in breeches.

 

Of course, if you had done your research more thoroughly, you would have also read and watched Bridget Jones´s Diary and realised the modern  moral: Never let a cad twang your big knickers.

 

 

Colin Firth took the role of Darcy in both stories. For those of you who don´t know who he is, he seems to be "the thinking woman´s crumpet".  Something for you to aspire to Thehandsom? 

 

 Actually i ADORE the old version of the movie,i saw it when i was little,and i still love watching it

Just remembering Mrs Bennet making me laugh even when reading the novel  {#lang_emotions_lol}

And that Mr. Darcy was reallyyy something !

 

http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title.jsp?stid=2153

 

 

23.       lesluv
722 posts
 03 Nov 2008 Mon 02:54 am

 

Quoting CANLI

 Actually i ADORE the old version of the movie,i saw it when i was little,and i still love watching it

And that Mr Darcy was really something !

 

http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title.jsp?stid=2153

 

i have seen this one too. i personally think it´s the character that you fall in love with. i don´t know what it is about Mr Darcy. He is perceived as a pompus ass but his arrogance is appealing in a weird sort of way....{#lang_emotions_shy}

24.       CANLI
5084 posts
 03 Nov 2008 Mon 03:03 am

 

Quoting lesluv

i have seen this one too. i personally think it´s the character that you fall in love with. i don´t know what it is about Mr Darcy. He is perceived as a pompus ass but his arrogance is appealing in a weird sort of way....{#lang_emotions_shy}

 

 Ã dont know too what is it with Mr.Darcy !{#lang_emotions_satisfied_nod}

Maybe because he was a gentleman all the way even with all his arrogance ? {#lang_emotions_confused}

And the commination of such character and a softened heart ...is ÃRRESÝSTÝBLE !{#lang_emotions_shy}

25.       lesluv
722 posts
 03 Nov 2008 Mon 03:07 am

"It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single girl in possession of her right mind must be in want of a decent man" {#lang_emotions_rolleyes}

26.       lesluv
722 posts
 03 Nov 2008 Mon 03:11 am

i am also considering reading this.... http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2412176.Seducing_Mr_Darcy

 

 

but i don´t think it will be as good as my imagination {#lang_emotions_lol_fast}

27.       CANLI
5084 posts
 03 Nov 2008 Mon 03:35 am

 

Quoting lesluv

i am also considering reading this.... http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2412176.Seducing_Mr_Darcy

 

 

 lol that is Austen´s part II of Pride and Prejudice? lol

 

Quoting lesluv  

but i don´t think it will be as good as my imagination {#lang_emotions_lol_fast}

 

Ýn that case,it wont be good as writting your own novel lol

28.       lady in red
6947 posts
 03 Nov 2008 Mon 05:36 pm

 

Quoting yilgun-7

1- Victor Hugo                           Les Miserables 

2- Fyoder Dostoyevsky               Crime and Punishment    

                                                The Brothers Karamazov

3-Leo Tolstoy                             War and Peace

                                                Anna Karenina 

4-Jane Austen                            Pride and Prejudice 

5-James Joyce                           Ulysses

6- Franz Kafka                            Die Verwandlung

                                                The trial

7-Viginia Wolf                            The Waves  

8- Upton Sinclair                        Oil 

9 –James Baldwin                      Go Tell it on the Mountain

10-Albert Camus                        The Stranger

11-John Steinbeck                      The Grapes of Wrath 

                                                Of Mice and Men

12-Ernest Hemingway                The Snows of Kilimanjaro

                                                The Old Man and the Sea 

                                                The Sun Also Rises          

13 – Yaþar Kemal                       Aðrýdaðý ( Aðrý Daðý) Efsanesi 
14-   Paul Auster                        Timbuktu

15- Robert Stone                        Dog Soldiersl

16- John Cheever                       Falconer

17- Gabriel Garcia Marquez         One Hundred Years Solitude

18- Vladimir Nabokov                 Lolita 

19- Jean Paul Sartre                   Les Mots

20- Virginia Woolf                     To the lighthouse

                                               Mrs.Dalloway    

21- William Faulkner                  Light in August

                                               The Sound and The Fury

22- Knut Hamsun                      Victoria

23- Graham Green                    The Power and the Glory

                                               The Heart of the Matter     

 24- Saul Bellow                        Herzog

 25- Henry Miller                       Tropic of Cancer

 26- Doris Lessing                     The Golden Notebook

 27- Toni Morrison                    Beloved

 28- George Orwell                   Animal Farm

 29-F.Scott Fitzgerald                The Great Gatsby

 30- Margaret Mitchell                Gone With the Wind        

 31-Yusuf Atýlgan                      Aylak Adam

 32-Antoine de Saint-Exupery     Le Petit Prince

 33-Benjamin Constant               Adolphe 

 

 

I would put -

 

Dr Zhivago - Boris Pasternak

Lord of the Flies - William Golding

To Kill a Mocking Bird - Harper Lee

On The Road - Jack Kerouac

Catch 22 - Joseph Heller

 

on that list

29.       girleegirl
5065 posts
 03 Nov 2008 Mon 05:58 pm

 

Quoting lady in red

 

I would put -

 

To Kill a Mocking Bird - Harper Lee

 

on that list

 

+10000000000000

Without a doubt! 

30.       lesluv
722 posts
 03 Nov 2008 Mon 06:01 pm

 

Quoting girleegirl

+10000000000000

Without a doubt! 

 

 yes this one was part of our english literature curriculum

31.       lady in red
6947 posts
 03 Nov 2008 Mon 06:07 pm

 

Quoting girleegirl

+10000000000000

Without a doubt! 

 

 I´m guessing you enjoyed it! 

32.       eiddie
169 posts
 03 Nov 2008 Mon 06:17 pm

The Fountainhead - Ayn Rand

 

:  >

33.       girleegirl
5065 posts
 03 Nov 2008 Mon 08:34 pm

 

Quoting lady in red

 I´m guessing you enjoyed it! 

 

 It is my all-time favorite.  {#lang_emotions_bigsmile}

34.       Elisabeth
5732 posts
 04 Nov 2008 Tue 06:44 pm

 

Quoting TheAenigma

 I know that I SHOULD love Catcher in the Rye, but is it ok that I don´t? 

Am I alone in this thought?

 

 You are absolutely NOT alone!  I didn´t care for it either......but then again, I prefer modern smut to old worn out classics!{#lang_emotions_lol_fast}

35.       Trudy
7887 posts
 04 Nov 2008 Tue 06:55 pm

Risking that some will call me almost illiterate, I dare to say I don´t read ´literature´. Even Dutch ´big´ writers I have hardly read, though I read a lot, just not stuff from famous people. ´My´ writers will never be on lists like this, but does it make their books less good or valuable? Of course I know some of the books in the first topic, a few were on my list for English class in secondary school (though I admit now I cheated with only seeing video´s and reading abstracts.... Sorry to my English teacher then, Mr. Hockx  {#lang_emotions_shy} .

36.       Elisabeth
5732 posts
 04 Nov 2008 Tue 07:11 pm

 

Quoting Trudy

Risking that some will call me almost illiterate, I dare to say I don´t read ´literature´. Even Dutch ´big´ writers I have hardly read, though I read a lot, just not stuff from famous people. ´My´ writers will never be on lists like this, but does it make their books less good or valuable? Of course I know some of the books in the first topic, a few were on my list for English class in secondary school (though I admit now I cheated with only seeing video´s and reading abstracts.... Sorry to my English teacher then, Mr. Hockx  {#lang_emotions_shy} .

 

 hehehe....you bed dutch!  Don´t worry, I did the same thing with a few so called, "American Classics."  We used to read the Cliff Notes on the book and not have to read the entire thing.  I think much "Literature" is over-rated....but of course most people would think I am illiterate too! 

37.       Daydreamer
3743 posts
 04 Nov 2008 Tue 07:58 pm

Elisabeth, Trudy, I hear you - I had to read the classics at the uni but they´re not on my favourite books list (at least not most of them). There´s a Polish book titled Ferdydurke by Gombrowicz. There´s a situation when a teacher asks the question why Slowacki (a Polish poet) stirs andmiration and love in us, only to answer it that it is due to his having been a great poet. An attempt to express his lack of love and admiration for Slowacki by one of the students is perceived as a personal attack on the teacher.

 

There are generations that blindly follow cannons of literature, fine arts and music. What do you mean you don´t like those Big names? They´re big, wise people found them admirable and so should you lol

38.       Trudy
7887 posts
 04 Nov 2008 Tue 08:05 pm

 

Quoting Daydreamer

What do you mean you don´t like those Big names? They´re big, wise people found them admirable and so should you lol

 

 Conclusion: I´m not wise. (Can´t answer for Elisabeth....   )

39.       Elisabeth
5732 posts
 04 Nov 2008 Tue 08:19 pm

 

Quoting Trudy

 Conclusion: I´m not wise. (Can´t answer for Elisabeth....   )

 

 Heavens NO!  I am not worldly or wise!  But I do love to read.......just love the occasional mindless Steven King story about some crazy town in north America.....or perhaps (God forbid) a trashy love novel....or maybe even a Non-Fiction (reading one now called Porn Generation - its´ about how porn and social liberalism is destroying civilization -Ben Shapiro)  Anyway, I don´t pretend to be intellectual....so I don´t think anyone will be disappointed at my reading choices!!  {#lang_emotions_lol_fast}

40.       Daydreamer
3743 posts
 04 Nov 2008 Tue 08:26 pm

Same here lol

One more thing from Ferdydurke:

"Great poetry being great and being poetry cannot fail to astonish us and thus astonishes us"

41.       teaschip
3870 posts
 05 Nov 2008 Wed 03:31 pm

 

Quoting Elisabeth

 hehehe....you bed dutch!  Don´t worry, I did the same thing with a few so called, "American Classics."  We used to read the Cliff Notes on the book and not have to read the entire thing.  I think much "Literature" is over-rated....but of course most people would think I am illiterate too! 

 

 Cliff Notes....I remember those...{#lang_emotions_lol_fast}  Best thing invented...

42.       ciko
784 posts
 05 Nov 2008 Wed 04:27 pm

are you still thinking about novels? you are supposed to be crying because Mccain lost

 

 

Quoting teaschip

Cliff Notes....I remember those...{#lang_emotions_lol_fast} Best thing invented...

 

 

43.       Elisabeth
5732 posts
 05 Nov 2008 Wed 09:36 pm

One of my favorite modern authors, Michael Crichton has died!  His stories were fun, smart and always pure entertainment:

 

 

http://movies.msn.com/movies/article.aspx/?news=338162&GT1=28101

44.       girleegirl
5065 posts
 05 Nov 2008 Wed 09:38 pm

 

Quoting Elisabeth

One of my favorite modern authors, Michael Crichton has died! 

 

 {#lang_emotions_cry}{#lang_emotions_sad}

45.       gOrgeOus
9 posts
 07 Nov 2008 Fri 07:47 am

such a great list.

 

Pride and Prejudice is the best novel of all time though.

46.       yilgun-7
1326 posts
 07 Nov 2008 Fri 12:41 pm

Thank you, Mia...

47.       yilgun-2010
572 posts
 20 Jan 2010 Wed 04:14 am

ALL-TİME BEST NOVELS  15

For novel readers

1- Victor HUGO :  Les Miserables 

2- Fyoder DOSTOYEVSKY : Crime and Punishment    

3-Leo TOLSTOY :  War and Peace

4-James JOYCE :  Ulysses

5- Franz KAFKA :  Die Verwandlung

6-Albert CAMUS :  The Stranger

7-John STEINBECK : The Grapes of Wrath 

8-Ernest HEMINGWAY : The Sun Also Rises          

9 – Yaşar KEMAL :  Ağrıdağı Efsanesi –Legend of Mountain Ağrı- 
10- Paul AUSTER : Timbuktu

11- Jean Paul SARTRE : Les Mots

12- William FAULKNER : The Sound and The Fury

13- Knut HAMSUN : Victoria

14- George ORWELL : Animal Farm

15- Margaret MITCHELL : Gone With the Wind       

 



Edited (1/26/2010) by yilgun-2010

48.       barba_mama
1629 posts
 20 Jan 2010 Wed 12:53 pm

Talking about your classics... To kill a mockingbird!

If you´re not a reader, at least watch the movie. Especially since this seems to be a hot topic on TLC It´s a very impressive story.

49.       slavica
814 posts
 20 Jan 2010 Wed 04:41 pm

 

Quoting yilgun-2010

ALL-TİME BEST NOVELS  15

For novel readers

1- Victor HUGO :  Les Miserables 

2- Fyoder DOSTOYEVSKY : Crime and Punishment    

3-Leo TOLSTOY :  War and Peace

4-James JOYCE :  Ulysses

5- Franz KAFKA :  Die Verwandlung

6-Albert CAMUS :  The Stranger

7-John STEINBECK : The Grapes of Wrath 

8-Ernest HEMINGWAY : The Sun Also Rises          

9 – Yaşar KEMAL :  Ağrıdağı Efsanesi –Legend of Mountain Ağrı- 
10- Paul AUSTER : Timbuktu

11- Jean Paul SARTRE : Les Mots

12- William FAULKNER : The Sound and The Fury

13- Knut HAMSUN : Victoria

14- George ORWELL : Animal Firm

15- Margaret MITCHELL : Gone With the Wind         

 

 

 

Oh, no, Yilgun, dear, NOT AGAIN! {#emotions_dlg.pray}

 

ALL-TIME 15 NOVELS

 

1.      

niobe
0 posts

 18 Feb 2007 Sun 01:47 am

 

 

ALL-TİME 15 NOVELS

 

1.      

yilgun-7
1326 posts

 22 Feb 2008 Fri 11:22 pm

 

 

 ALL-TIME BEST NOVELS

 

1.      

yilgun-7
1326 posts

 02 Nov 2008 Sun 04:24 am

 

 

47.      

yilgun-2010
127 posts

 20 Jan 2010 Wed 04:14 am

 

50.       lady in red
6947 posts
 20 Jan 2010 Wed 05:43 pm

You know there´s nothing new under the sun! {#emotions_dlg.bigsmile} - and I do think the addition of ´in my opinion´ would be nice - where is ´Dr Zhivago??!  But Yilgun doesn´t seem to have much time for more modern literature - things don´t have to be old to be good!

 

Quoting slavica

 

 

 

Oh, no, Yilgun, dear, NOT AGAIN! {#emotions_dlg.pray}

 

 




Edited (1/20/2010) by lady in red

51.       Daydreamer
3743 posts
 20 Jan 2010 Wed 11:10 pm

 

Quoting lady in red

You know there´s nothing new under the sun! {#emotions_dlg.bigsmile} - and I do think the addition of ´in my opinion´ would be nice - where is ´Dr Zhivago??!  But Yilgun doesn´t seem to have much time for more modern literature - things don´t have to be old to be good!

 

Quoting slavica

 

 

 

Oh, no, Yilgun, dear, NOT AGAIN! {#emotions_dlg.pray}

 

 


 

hehehe what a surprising thread, isn´t it? lol Don´t you know it´s in Yilgunish? It is a list, it is arbitrary and non-debatable. Should you insist on him revealing who is behind this list, you´ll hear it´s our friends linguists/literature critics/world specialist or the world media. How many times do you need to be reminded NOT to ask uncomfortable questions? Shame on you ladies!{#emotions_dlg.shame}

52.       lemon
1374 posts
 20 Jan 2010 Wed 11:52 pm

 

Quoting Daydreamer

Same here lol

One more thing from Ferdydurke:

"Great poetry being great and being poetry cannot fail to astonish us and thus astonishes us"

 

never could understand gombrowicz.

53.       vineyards
1954 posts
 21 Jan 2010 Thu 01:11 am

Of course, I haven´t read all the best novels but the ones I remember at first blush are:

 

Ulyses (Joyce)

Anna Karenina (Tolstoy)

Father Goriot (Balzac)

Fathers and Sons (Turgenev)

Crime and Punishment (Dostoevsky)

 

Each one of these book influenced me in a different way. I owe my nihilist side to my (mis)understanding of Turgenev´s magnificent novel.

 

Father Goriot is a masterpiece of depictions.

Anna Karenina represents the ultimate point reached in story telling.

 

You almost feel you are a part of the story when you read Crime and Punishment since you keep questioning yourself and feel as if you are facing the same venues of deceit and corruption as you drift from one episode to another in a state of sheer oblivion and complete deprivation.

 

Ullyses must be one of the most difficult to understand novels.



Edited (1/21/2010) by vineyards

54.       alameda
3499 posts
 21 Jan 2010 Thu 02:03 am

 

Quoting yilgun-2010

ALL-TİME BEST NOVELS  15

For novel readers

1- Victor HUGO :  Les Miserables 

2- Fyoder DOSTOYEVSKY : Crime and Punishment    

3-Leo TOLSTOY :  War and Peace

4-James JOYCE :  Ulysses

 

Yilgun,

 

I notice the books mentioned here, with the exeption of Yaşar Kemal, are all Western novelists.  Have you never read any of the great works by, for example, Lady Murasaki´s Tale of Gengi? It is considered to be the first true novel, and it was written by a woman.

55.       yilgun-2010
572 posts
 21 Jan 2010 Thu 03:11 am

For Alameda:

 

Thank  you very much for your  review.

I have never read any novel on Chinese or Japanese  literature-novel or story-.

You are right, because we are always interested in Turkish and Western Novelists.

I have no any knowledge about Japanese or Chinese literature and novelists.

My university branch is engineering but “ Literature and books” is my hobby.

This list show my favorite “all time novels” for “novel readers” as a recommendation.

I don’t like todays novels in general; in my opinion, they are not impressive and high in quality.

For examplean Brown:

Brown writes novels based on science like a real historic document.

But he is of course a good writer.His novels are very good for movie.Because he is a good historian at the same time.

I think the others novelist write average novels, not top level; but repetition novels.

I think they seem not the best level, not high in quality

I think sometimes the art of novel has died : Technology Century.

This is my opinion.

By the way, I shall look for any Japanese or Chinese novel like the novel “The Tale of Gengi”  By Lady Murasaki,  here in Ankara, İzmir and İstanbul.

But I would love to read “Tale of Gengi” especially someday.

Thank you again.

 

P.S.

The Tale of Genji (, Genji Monogatari?) is a classic work of Japanese literature

attributed to the Japanese noblewoman Murasaki Shikibu in the early eleventh

century, around the peak of the Heian Period. It is sometimes called the

world´s first novel, the first modern novel, the first psychological novel or the

first novel still to be considered a classic, though this issue is a matter of

debate.

 



Edited (1/21/2010) by yilgun-2010
Edited (1/21/2010) by yilgun-2010

56.       alameda
3499 posts
 21 Jan 2010 Thu 04:36 am

 

Quoting yilgun-2010

For Alameda:

 

Thank  you very much for your  review.

I have never read any novel on Chinese or Japanese  literature-novel or story-.

You are right, because we are always interested in Turkish and Western Novelists.

I have no any knowledge about Japanese or Chinese literature and novelists.

My university branch is engineering but “ Literature and books” is my hobby.

This list show my favorite “all time novels” for “novel readers” as a recommendation.

I don’t like todays novels in general; in my opinion, they are not impressive and high in quality.

For examplean Brown:

Brown writes novels based on science like a real historic document.

But he is of course a good writer.His novels are very good for movie.Because he is a good historian at the same time.

I think the others novelist write average novels, not top level; but repetition novels.

 

I think they seem not the best level, not high in quality

I think sometimes the art of novel has died : Technology Century.

This is my opinion.

 

By the way, I shall look for any Japanese or Chinese novel like the novel “The Tale of Gengi”  By Lady Murasaki,  here in Ankara, İzmir and İstanbul.

But I would love to read “Tale of Gengi” especially someday.

Thank you again.

 

P.S.

The Tale of Genji (, Genji Monogatari?) is a classic work of Japanese literature

attributed to the Japanese noblewoman Murasaki Shikibu in the early eleventh

century, around the peak of the Heian Period. It is sometimes called the

world´s first novel, the first modern novel, the first psychological novel or the

first novel still to be considered a classic, though this issue is a matter of

debate.

 

 

 

You may want to try The Pillow Book by Sei Shonagon, a lady of the Imperial court.   It was written during Japan´s Heian period.  It´s a delightful book on her impressions and thoughts on life and events.  She wrote it before going to sleep.  It give you a glimpse into how life was at that time.  It is not a large book and the way it was written makes it a easy and pretty fast read.

 

You can read some of it here.

 

This book is a good introdction to Japanese literature



Edited (1/21/2010) by alameda [add]
Edited (1/21/2010) by alameda [edit]

57.       lemon
1374 posts
 21 Jan 2010 Thu 12:25 pm

Gabriel Garcia Marquez         One Hundred Years Solutude

 

this is the best ever thing i happen to read. loved it. crazy. my type of book.

58.       Elisabeth
5732 posts
 21 Jan 2010 Thu 04:11 pm

 

Quoting lemon

Gabriel Garcia Marquez         One Hundred Years Solutude

 

this is the best ever thing i happen to read. loved it. crazy. my type of book.

 

 I really like his books.  His stories stay with you for a long time after reading them.  I enjoyed "Love in the Time of Cholera" almost as much as "One Hundred Years of Solitude."

59.       lady in red
6947 posts
 21 Jan 2010 Thu 05:07 pm

 

Quoting alameda

 

 

You may want to try The Pillow Book by Sei Shonagon.  It was written during Japan´s Heian period.  It´s a delightful book written by a lady of the court, on her impressions and thoughts before going to sleep.  It give you a glimpse into how life was at that time.  It is not a large book and the way it was written makes it a easy and pretty fast read.

 

You can read some of it here.

 

This book is a good introdction to Japanese literature

 

I have read three books by the modern Japanese author, Haruki Murakami - ´Norwegian Wood´, ´The Wind-up Bird Chronicles´ and ´Hard-boiled Wonderland and the End of the World. Difficult to pinpoint the genre really and quite different to anything else I have read. 

60.       Trudy
7887 posts
 21 Jan 2010 Thu 06:40 pm

 

Quoting lady in red

 

 

I have read three books by the modern Japanese author, Haruki Murakami - ´Norwegian Wood´, ´The Wind-up Bird Chronicles´ and ´Hard-boiled Wonderland and the End of the World. Difficult to pinpoint the genre really and quite different to anything else I have read. 

 

Three classic Japanese books: Silence by Shusaku Endo ( link ), Snow country by Yasunari Kuwabata ( link ) and the imo best one: Totto-chan, the little girl at the window by Tetsuko Kuroyagani ( link ). My Japanese friends living here were pleasantly surprised when they saw these books at my place. The last book made one of them cry as she remembered her childhood in Japan. 

61.       Elisabeth
5732 posts
 21 Jan 2010 Thu 07:35 pm

Just finished "The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind."  Lovely story!  Very inspirational:

 

Read more about it:

http://williamkamkwamba.typepad.com/williamkamkwamba/2009/04/my-book-the-boy-who-harnessed-the-wind.html

62.       elenagabriela
2040 posts
 21 Jan 2010 Thu 07:44 pm

Frederic Beigbeder - Love Lasts Three Years (L`Amoure dure trois ans)

63.       slavica
814 posts
 22 Jan 2010 Fri 01:58 pm

My absolute favorite is "War and Peace" and I can only agree with those who consider it one of the greatest novels ever written. An epic in prose (as author himself has qualified it), the novel fascinates me with its realistic story of five aristocratic Russian families and their life under extraordinary historical circumstances, in particular Napoleon´s invasion of Russia 1812. Besides author´s view of historical events and characters (based on years of researching historical facts), several love stories and fantastic portraits (Natasha Rostova, Andrey Bolkonsky, old Prince Bolkonsky), what fascinates me mostly are vivid descriptions: battle scenes, court balls, scenes of hunting… I read this book over and over again and it is never boring to me.

 

My favorite of modern novels is Paulo Coelho´s “By the River Piedra I Sat Down and Wept”. I accept that Coelho is a controversial author and I myself don´t like his manner of using the same successful formula in every novel, but this novel, the first Coelho´s novel I´ve read, really left me breathless! Not only because of the story, characters and message, but mostly because I found every other sentence a thought, an aphorism, and it was something I have seen for the first time  as writing style, and loved.  I read the book in one evening, and tomorrow I took it and read it again, which I never did before. This book also remained the one of those I read every now and then and every time enjoy it as at the first reading.

 

I can´t resist adding a couple of quotes from Coelho´s novel:

-         Everyday, God gives us the sun - and also one moment in which we have the ability to change everything...

-         A fall from the third floor hurts as much as a fall from the hundredth. If I have to fall, may it be from a high place.

-         You have to take risks. We will only understand the miracle of life fully when we allow the unexpected to happen.

-         Sometimes happiness is a blessing - but generally it´s a conquest. The magic moment of the day changes us and makes us take off in the direction of our dreams.

-         Love perseveres. It´s men who change.

-         The universe always helps us fight for our dreams, no matter how foolish they may be. Our dreams are our own, and only we can know the effort required to keep them alive.

 

And here you can read more…

64.       vineyards
1954 posts
 22 Jan 2010 Fri 03:00 pm

If you like Coelho, you´ll probably like Pamuk too. I feel there is a further link between these two and Umberto Eco. Eco strayed from usual novel form and these two followed in his foot steps. The difference being where the other two are just two laymen in matters they covered in their books, Eco has also a very strong philosophical and scientific background. He knows what he is writing better than everyone else therefore nobody speculates about him.

 

Like you I like the first two books of Coelho and a few books by Pamuk. They are fairly easy to read and relaxing. If you have an adventerous mind that likes to take excursions into myths, you may find yourself with puzzles. I prefer to iron them out in my mind for the sake of saving some grey matter for more down-to-earth uses.



Edited (1/22/2010) by vineyards

65.       slavica
814 posts
 22 Jan 2010 Fri 11:40 pm

You are right, I like historically based novels, with translating historical circumstances to modern ones, and that’s why I like Eco’s The Name of the Rose and some novels of Orhan Pamuk (Beyaz Kale, Benim Adım Kırmızı ) – but I can’t say I like them generally, as well as Coelho. Talking about Coelho, not only you and me, everyone I talked about his novels said that he liked mostly the first his novel he read. After the first, every new novel was a kind of repeating, which became boring with time.



Edited (1/22/2010) by slavica
Edited (1/22/2010) by slavica [a typo (again)]

66.       yilgun-2010
572 posts
 25 Jan 2010 Mon 01:04 am

For slavica .

How are you?

May I ask you?

About Duda, old TLC ´ member.

Has she written her last novel?

Has she found a good Turkish translator for her novel?

We are waiting here for her new novel...

67.       slavica
814 posts
 26 Jan 2010 Tue 12:23 am

 

Quoting yilgun-2010

For slavica .

 

How are you?

May I ask you?

About Duda, old TLC ´ member.

Has she written her last novel?

Has she found a good Turkish translator for her novel?

We are waiting here for her new novel...

 

 I sent you a PM, dear

68.       ptaszek
440 posts
 26 Jan 2010 Tue 12:37 am

 

Quoting slavica

You are right, I like historically based novels, with translating historical circumstances to modern ones, and that’s why I like Eco’s The Name of the Rose and some novels of Orhan Pamuk (Beyaz Kale, Benim Adım Kırmızı ) – but I can’t say I like them generally, as well as Coelho. Talking about Coelho, not only you and me, everyone I talked about his novels said that he liked mostly the first his novel he read. After the first, every new novel was a kind of repeating, which became boring with time.

 

 I agree,I am bored with Coelho.I started reading him from the warrior of the light and Veronica decides to die and I loved the books,but the more I read the more repetitive he sounded.Then I discovered all his books are based on Don Miguel Ruiz and Toltecs teaching,had a swift on Erich Emmanuel Schmitt works and Ruiz Zafon Carlos as modern liyerature is concerned.

I sleep with the Lonely londoners by Sam Selvon these days and Andrea Levy´s small island not to neglect Zadie Smith but in a meanwhile I read A.saint-Exupery and the wizard of OZ by F.Baum

Anyway all books on yilgun´s list I am familiar with agreeing on Tolstoy´s masterpiece.

69.       slavica
814 posts
 26 Jan 2010 Tue 01:42 am

 

Quoting ptaszek

 

 

Anyway all books on yilgun´s list I am familiar with agreeing on Tolstoy´s masterpiece.

 

Which one? Yilgun-7´s or Yilgun-2010´s list? {#emotions_dlg.bigsmile}

 

I agree with you about  Yilgun-2010´s list, for the first one I must admit I´m not familiar with every book from it {#emotions_dlg.shy}

70.       lady in red
6947 posts
 26 Jan 2010 Tue 12:43 pm

I just realised ´Animal Firm´ is on the list.  Great book!  Follows on from the farmyard years after the guys meet up with  Alan Sugar.

 

Quoting Yilgun:

13- Knut HAMSUN : Victoria

14- George ORWELL : Animal Firm

15- Margaret MITCHELL : Gone With the Wind        

 



Edited (1/26/2010) by lady in red [added quote to upstage modification!!]

71.       vineyards
1954 posts
 26 Jan 2010 Tue 01:48 pm

 

Quoting lady in red

I just realised ´Animal Firm´ is on the list.  Great book!  Follows on from the farmyard years after the guys meet up with  Alan Sugar.

 

 

 

I know Animal Farm but have no clue about Animal Firm.

 

I read 1984, Animal Farm and Coming Up for Air but I barely remember the plot. It must have been 25 years.



Edited (1/26/2010) by vineyards

72.       yilgun-2010
572 posts
 26 Jan 2010 Tue 02:19 pm

Animal Farm  by George ORWELL

( Hayvan Çiftliği )



Edited (1/26/2010) by yilgun-2010

73.       Daydreamer
3743 posts
 26 Jan 2010 Tue 05:16 pm

Animal farm and 1984 are great books, I´ve read them a number of times and always find something new in them. They seem especially true to a reader if you were raised in a totalitarian society.

 

We had Joyce´s Ulysses as a compulsory read back at the uni. I have to admit I never managed to get through it. It was just painful to read

74.       lady in red
6947 posts
 26 Jan 2010 Tue 06:13 pm

 

Quoting vineyards

 

 

I know Animal Farm but have no clue about Animal Firm.

 

 

 

It was my little joke at the expense of Yilgun´s mistake Vineyards {#emotions_dlg.sad} - possibly only my fellow Brits will get it.

75.       barba_mama
1629 posts
 27 Jan 2010 Wed 12:15 am

 

Quoting lady in red

 

 

It was my little joke at the expense of Yilgun´s mistake Vineyards {#emotions_dlg.sad} - possibly only my fellow Brits will get it.

 

 Don´t worry I´m not a Brit and I got it We get some Sugar on our tv here too!

76.       SuiGeneris
3922 posts
 27 Jan 2010 Wed 12:21 am

J.R. Tolkein -- Lord Of The Rings

77.       elenagabriela
2040 posts
 27 Jan 2010 Wed 08:34 am

 

Quoting SuiGeneris

J.R. Tolkein -- Lord Of The Rings

 

 + 100

78.       ptaszek
440 posts
 27 Jan 2010 Wed 11:19 pm

my vote is for"the Master and Margarita"by M.Bulhakov..the devil comes to Moscow to penetrate humans souls...wonderful read!

79.       elenagabriela
2040 posts
 30 Jan 2010 Sat 09:53 pm

Orhan Pamuk - Kar

80.       barba_mama
1629 posts
 30 Jan 2010 Sat 10:42 pm

I just can´t get through a Pamuk book... the writing-style doesn´t match my reading-style I guess.

81.       Trudy
7887 posts
 31 Jan 2010 Sun 01:28 am

 

Quoting barba_mama

I just can´t get through a Pamuk book... the writing-style doesn´t match my reading-style I guess.

 

Same for me.

82.       elenagabriela
2040 posts
 31 Jan 2010 Sun 10:15 am

maybe it is a little hard to understand his style, but after 1-2 books all becomes easy - my point of view

83.       barba_mama
1629 posts
 31 Jan 2010 Sun 03:00 pm

I understand it, it´s just not my taste. I like to read a book for my pleasure. If going through it seems like a battle, I don´t want to read it anymore "My name is Red" was on the list of my book club, but didn´t even finish it yet. I put it somewhere in a corner and just waited for the next book to come along

84.       lady in red
6947 posts
 31 Jan 2010 Sun 11:23 pm

 

Quoting Trudy

 

 

Same for me.

 

Me too - maybe they lose a lot in translation (I did manage to finish Kar though)

85.       elenagabriela
2040 posts
 01 Feb 2010 Mon 07:16 pm

sorry LIR but I know a kid (friend of my 17 y old daughter) who managed to read it in less than a week (and they follow a mathematical  -  informathics profile at highschool)

86.       lady in red
6947 posts
 01 Feb 2010 Mon 08:04 pm

 

Quoting elenagabriela

sorry LIR but I know a kid (friend of my 17 y old daughter) who managed to read it in less than a week (and they follow a mathematical  -  informathics profile at highschool)

 

Did I say how long it took me???  {#emotions_dlg.laugh_at}  (and what´s an informathics profile????)

87.       elenagabriela
2040 posts
 01 Feb 2010 Mon 08:10 pm

their basic activity is not literature (and still she`s only 17 y old){#emotions_dlg.flowers}

88.       barba_mama
1629 posts
 01 Feb 2010 Mon 08:59 pm

I couldn´t really get through watching Benjamin Button either. This doesn´t mean the movie was highly intellectual or something. I just found it a good story, but a bit of a drag at points. I feel the same about Pamuk books. I just get the feeling I want to fast forward through a few bits. The problem is that I can´t do that in books

89.       yilgun-2010
572 posts
 19 May 2011 Thu 07:28 pm

-THE METAMORPHOSİS - DEĞİŞİM

By Franz KAFKA

The story begins with a traveling salesman,  waking to find himself transformed into a monstrous insect.Kafka is the one of the best writers of the 20th century.

 

-THE STRANGER  (THE OUTSIDER),   L’  ETRANGER - YABANCI

By Albert CAMUS

The title character is Meursault, an Algerian who seemingly irrationally kills an Arab man whom he recognises in French Algiers. Meursault shoots an Arab for no reason.Camus theme and outlook are often cited as examples of existentialism,  though Camus did not consider himself an existentialist like J.P.Sartre.

 

Good novels

90.       yilgun-2010
572 posts
 23 Jun 2011 Thu 03:22 am

THE TOP 50 BOOKS OF ALL TİME


THE MOST INFLUENTIAL BOOKS (NOVEL, STORY, PLAY, POETRY, ESSAY) FOR YOUR HOME LIBRARY


 


1-Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy, Russia


2-Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert, france


3-War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy, Russia


4-The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, United States


5-Hamlet by William Shakespeare, England


6-Selected Poems by William Shakespeare, England


7-Selected Stories by Anton P.Chekhov, Russia


8-Selected Stories by Sait Faik, Türkiye


9-The Stranger by Albert Camus, France


10-The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka, Czechoslovakia


11-Selected stories and poems of Edgar Allan Poe, United States


12-Ulyses by James Joyce, Ireland


13-War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy, Russia


14-Dead Souls by Nikolai Gogol, Russia


15-The Government Inspector by Nikolai Gogol, Russia


16-Gone With the Wind by Ernest Hemingway, United States


17-The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway, United States


18-Animal Firm by George Orwell, England


19-Les Miserables by Victor Hugo, France


20-The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck, United States


21-In Dubious Battle by John Steinbeck, United States


22-Trilogy, Molloy, Malone Dies, The Unnamable by Samuel Beckett, Ireland


23-The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner, United States


24-The Wall –Le mur - by Jean-Paul Sartre, France


25-Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy, Russia


26-The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor M.Dostoyevsky, Russia


27-Crime and Punishment by Fyodor M.Dostoyevsky, Russia


28-Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Spain


29-Essays by Michel de Montaigne, France


30-Guliver Travels by Jonathan Swift, Ireland


31-Victoria by Knut Hamsun, Norway


32-Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert, France


33-One Hundred years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Maquez, Colombia


34-Codin by Panait Istrati, Romania


35-The Ports of the Levant by Amin Maalouf,  Lebanon


36-Ağrıdağı Efsanesi (The Ararat Legend) by Yaşar Kemal, Türkiye


37-Aylak Adam (The Loiterer) by Yusuf Atılgan, Türkiye


38-İlköğretmen- The Primary Teacher by Cengiz Aymatov, Kyrgyzstan


39-The Waste Land by T.S.Eliot, United States


40-Selected stories by Maxim Gorky, Russia


41- All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque, Germany


42- Le Petit Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery, france


43- Adolphe by Benjamin Constant, Switzerland


44- Herzog by Saul Bellow, Canada


45- An American tragedy by Theodore Dreiser, United States


46- Angels and Demons by Dan Brown, United States


47- Timbuktu by  Paul Auster, United States


48- The Waves by Viginia Wolf, England


49- Oil  by Upton Sinclair, United States


50- The Power and the Glory by  Graham Green, England                                                                                                  


 


Enjoy your readings



Edited (6/23/2011) by yilgun-2010
Edited (6/23/2011) by yilgun-2010
Edited (7/1/2011) by yilgun-2010
Edited (7/12/2011) by yilgun-2010

91.       gokuyum
5049 posts
 24 Jun 2011 Fri 02:40 am

 

Quoting yilgun-2010

THE TOP 50 BOOKS OF ALL TİME

THE MOST INFLUENTIAL BOOKS (NOVEL, STORY, PLAY, POETRY, ESSAY) FOR YOUR HOME LIBRARY

 Here are the ones i read and failed to read i put a r(ead) and a f(ailed) near them please do so and lets compare our tastes.

1-Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy, Russia

2-Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert, france  r

3-War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy, Russia

4-The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, United States

5-Hamlet by William Shakespeare, England r

6-Selected Poems by William Shakespeare, England

7-Selected Stories by Anton P.Chekhov, Russia

8-Selected Stories by Sait Faik, Türkiye

9-The Stranger by Albert Camus, France r

10-The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka, Czechoslovakia r

11-Selected stories and poems of Edgar Allan Poe, United States r

12-Ulyses by James Joyce, Ireland f

13-War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy, Russia

14-Dead Souls by Nikolai Gogol, Russia

15-The Government Inspector by Nikolai Gogol, Russia

16-Gone With the Wind by Ernest Hemingway, United States

17-The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway, United States

18-Animal Firm by George Orwell, England r

19-Les Miserables by Victor Hugo, France

20-The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck, United States

21-In Dubious Battle by John Steinbeck, United States

22-Trilogy, Molloy, Malone Dies, The Unnamable by Samuel Beckett, Ireland

23-The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner, United States f

24-The Wall –Le mur - by Jean-Paul Sartre, France r

25-Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy, Russia

26-The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor M.Dostoyevsky, Russia r

27-Crime and Punishment by Fyodor M.Dostoyevsky, Russia r

28-Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Spain r

29-Essays by Michel de Montaigne, France r (some of them)

30-Guliver Travels by Jonathan Swift, Ireland

31-Victoria by Knut Hamsun, Norway

32-Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert, France r

33-One Hundred years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Maquez, Colombia f

34-Codin by Panait Istrati, Romania

35-The Ports of the Levant by Amin Maalouf,  Lebanon

36-Ağrıdağı Efsanesi (The Ararat Legend) by Yaşar Kemal, Türkiye r

37-Aylak Adam (The Loiterer) by Yusuf Atılgan, Türkiye r

38-İlköğretmen- The Primary Teacher by Cengiz Aymatov, Kyrgyzstan r

39-The Waste Land by T.S.Eliot, United States

40-Selected stories by Maxim Gorky, Russia

41- The Golden Notebook by Doris Lessing, England

42- Le Petit Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery, france r

43- Adolphe by Benjamin Constant, Switzerland

44- Herzog by Saul Bellow, Canada

45- An American tragedy by Theodore Dreiser, United States

46- Beloved by Toni Morrison, United States

47- Timbuktu by  Paul Auster, United States

48- The Waves by Viginia Wolf, England

49- Oil  by Upton Sinclair, United States

50- The Power and the Glory by  Graham Green, England                                                                                                  

 

Enjoy your readings

 

 



Edited (6/24/2011) by gokuyum

92.       gokuyum
5049 posts
 24 Jun 2011 Fri 02:45 am

 

Quoting barba_mama

I understand it, it´s just not my taste. I like to read a book for my pleasure. If going through it seems like a battle, I don´t want to read it anymore "My name is Red" was on the list of my book club, but didn´t even finish it yet. I put it somewhere in a corner and just waited for the next book to come along

 

In my opinion "My Name Is Red" is his best book. It is easy to read and very enjoying. If you didn´t like this never open the cover of "Black Book". I finished it and lost my sanity



Edited (6/24/2011) by gokuyum

93.       peacetrain
1905 posts
 25 Jun 2011 Sat 08:44 am

 

Quoting gokuyum

 

 

In my opinion "My Name Is Red" is his best book. It is easy to read and very enjoying. If you didn´t like this never open the cover of "Black Book". I finished it and lost my sanity

I read his "Istanbul" book first and enjoyed it.  I didn´t read another until recently, when I read "The Black Book".  I enjoyed this one too, although it was peculiar in some ways and my simple mind was disappointed with the ending lol. 

I tried to read "Museum of Innocence" but had to give it up because I wasn´t enjoying the subject matter, although I can appreciate Pamuk´s skill in developing his characters.

His work that I´ve enjoyed the most is "Snow".  I waited for over a month for "My Name is Red" to become available from the library but, after reading about 100 pages, I´ve had to give up on it.  I will return to it later though.  It´s a busy time of year at work and, as I was reading, I found myself wondering what I had just read on the page because my mind drifted to work matters.  I´ll give it another try when I´m on holiday.  So, the fault there is mine, not Pamuk´s.

 

94.       libralady
5152 posts
 28 Jun 2011 Tue 02:48 pm

 

Quoting peacetrain

 

I read his "Istanbul" book first and enjoyed it.  I didn´t read another until recently, when I read "The Black Book".  I enjoyed this one too, although it was peculiar in some ways and my simple mind was disappointed with the ending lol. 

I tried to read "Museum of Innocence" but had to give it up because I wasn´t enjoying the subject matter, although I can appreciate Pamuk´s skill in developing his characters.

His work that I´ve enjoyed the most is "Snow".  I waited for over a month for "My Name is Red" to become available from the library but, after reading about 100 pages, I´ve had to give up on it.  I will return to it later though.  It´s a busy time of year at work and, as I was reading, I found myself wondering what I had just read on the page because my mind drifted to work matters.  I´ll give it another try when I´m on holiday.  So, the fault there is mine, not Pamuk´s.

 

 

 Reminds me of The Golden Notebook by Doris Lessing - I can say that is the most tedious boring book I have ever "tried" to read in my life!!  It would not be on my recommended list!!  Doubt if I will ever return to it {#emotions_dlg.satisfied_nod}

95.       alameda
3499 posts
 03 Jul 2011 Sun 08:35 am

hmmm....I liked My Name is Red, but much preferred his New Life. Black Book was fine, but New Life is my favorite of his books. I´ve read most all his works up to Istanbul, which was interesting as a sort of historic/biographic novel, but had no where near the impact of his other more surreal works. 

Quoting gokuyum

 

 

In my opinion "My Name Is Red" is his best book. It is easy to read and very enjoying. If you didn´t like this never open the cover of "Black Book". I finished it and lost my sanity

 

 

96.       elenagabriela
2040 posts
 05 Jul 2011 Tue 08:59 am

 

Quoting gokuyum

 

 

In my opinion "My Name Is Red" is his best book. It is easy to read and very enjoying. If you didn´t like this never open the cover of "Black Book". I finished it and lost my sanity

 I agree you about "My Name is Red". But few months ago I read and enjoyed very much "The Museum of Innocence"..indeed it is not like the others books  of Pamuk but I liked it much more than ´Snow´ or "Black Book"; anyway, even Pamuk is not vey well known in my country he is a great writer{#emotions_dlg.flowers}

 

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