Welcome
Login:   Pass:     Register - Forgot Password - Resend Activation

Turkish Class Forums / Travelling to Turkey

Travelling to Turkey

Add reply to this discussion
Moderators: libralady, sonunda
Gift ideas please
(39 Messages in 4 pages - View all)
1 2 3 4
1.       Joelle
5 posts
 30 Apr 2009 Thu 06:32 pm

I will be going to Turkey in 10 days, and would like to bring simple gifts (from my country, the United States) for the people I meet.


 


When I was in Turkey about a year ago, I was shown such kindness and generosity by strangers.  A few time some Turkish people we didn´t know at all even gave part of their lunch to us!  (Which tasted fabulous, I might add.)  I wished I had something I could have given them from the United States.


 


Here is a list of ideas I have come up with, but I would like more suggestions:


·     Postcards from the US


·     Coins from the US


·     Tea from the US


 


 Thanks!

2.       buyo
1 posts
 30 Apr 2009 Thu 07:43 pm

 

Quoting Joelle

I will be going to Turkey in 10 days, and would like to bring simple gifts (from my country, the United States) for the people I meet.

 

When I was in Turkey about a year ago, I was shown such kindness and generosity by strangers.  A few time some Turkish people we didn´t know at all even gave part of their lunch to us!  (Which tasted fabulous, I might add.)  I wished I had something I could have given them from the United States.

 

Here is a list of ideas I have come up with, but I would like more suggestions:

·     Postcards from the US

·     Coins from the US

·     Tea from the US

 

 Thanks!

hi Joelle.. if you are want to take gift for your Turkish friends, you can buy silvers, ethnich products, playcards, viskhy, cigarettes, chocolates, havana puro

 

 

3.       adana
416 posts
 30 Apr 2009 Thu 09:13 pm

 

Quoting buyo

 

 

 

 

 BTW don´t forget to bring some American democracy...

4.       raindrops
267 posts
 30 Apr 2009 Thu 10:03 pm

causticity ...

5.       adana
416 posts
 30 Apr 2009 Thu 10:09 pm

 

Quoting raindrops

causticity ...

 

 ???????????kim?????????Ben??????????AngelAllah korusun)))

 

6.       Joelle
5 posts
 03 May 2009 Sun 02:37 am

Did anyone have any helpful suggestions of things I could give?

7.       joooe86
296 posts
 03 May 2009 Sun 02:55 am

in the countries that i visited, i buy playing cards which have sightseeing photos on the cards.. u can bring something like that.

8.       Bodrum Dreams
3 posts
 03 May 2009 Sun 06:01 am

For friendly strangers, especially children, I give packs of gum or containers of mints (tic tacs, etc).  Ladies like American brands of handcream.  Also, cigarettes are appreciated.

If you are visiting friends, you should get more thoughtful gifts.  Many teenagers like t-shirts from America.  Sports teams or from where you live (such as Florida, Disney), etc.

I hope this helps.  Have fun!

9.       Joelle
5 posts
 04 May 2009 Mon 10:12 pm

So would Turkish people like postcards, coins, and tea from the US?

10.       adana
416 posts
 04 May 2009 Mon 10:29 pm

 

Quoting Joelle

So would Turkish people like postcards, coins, and tea from the US?

 

 would you like coins,pebbles,seashells,postcards...etc given to you by a stranger???

 

11.       adana
416 posts
 04 May 2009 Mon 10:35 pm

Joelle,Turkish ppl r simply wonderful at helping foreigners.Do you really think they need to be paternized with a gift,don´t you think a smile,genuine acknowledgments ,and true hand shake would be enough?And if you want to show your appreciation with a modest gift sweets will do,calendars,small stationary ....but Turks help without waiting for a gift)in return)

12.       Joelle
5 posts
 05 May 2009 Tue 01:48 am

 

Quoting adana

  

 would you like coins,pebbles,seashells,postcards...etc given to you by a stranger???

 

 

Yes.  I hadn´t thought of pebbles and seashells.  I guess I didn´t pay much attention, are pebbles and seashells different there?

I ask because every culture is different.  For example, I wouldn´t go up to a foreigner in the US and share my lunch with them.  We are taught in the US not to take food from strangers.

13.       adana
416 posts
 05 May 2009 Tue 01:52 am

 

Quoting Joelle

 

Quoting adana

  

 would you like coins,pebbles,seashells,postcards...etc given to you by a stranger???

 

 

.  We are taught in the US not to take food from strangers.

 Pavlov´s dogs????Big smile

 

14.       smiley
541 posts
 05 May 2009 Tue 02:02 am

No, I wouldn´t be too keen to give coins or postcards..  Firstly the coins, would be like tipping except that the receiver would not be able to spend it.  Unless the person you are giving to collects foreign coins.  Postcards are best received in the post.  Tea, well, Turkish people drink lots of cay.  Yes, they might like to try foreign tea.

When visiting friends, I like taking chocolates (mind, during the hot summer, the chocolate will melt) packets of biscuits, bags of sweets and mints, are often much appreciated.  The suggestion of picture playing cards is also very good.



Edited (5/5/2009) by smiley [Left out a few words]

15.       adana
416 posts
 05 May 2009 Tue 02:10 am

People.why all this fuss about ???In my case..thanking for foreigners help is a decent hug,attention given,small talk ,etc...things go totally different with old friends and gifts are different..

of course most of ppl are helpful,handy,etc but does that mean they expect sth in return???sth material???sth they can show to others?...doubt..doubt...world is not such americanized.. can live without generous American gifts.....Turkish world,I mean<img src='/static/images/smileys//lol.gif' alt='lol'> (fast)

16.       Henry
2604 posts
 05 May 2009 Tue 03:31 am

Hi Joelle,

I agree with Adana. Turkish people do not expect gifts in return for their hospitality or friendly offers. If you know someone really well, then certainly bring a small gift when visiting them.

Sweets of any sort always seem to be appreciated. Learning to say thank you in Turkish is a good start to show your appreciation. Learn more Turkish to engage in simple conversations and they will appreciate that you have made an effort to communicate with them. Mostly a smile and a sincere thank you will be enough.

17.       alameda
3499 posts
 05 May 2009 Tue 06:51 am

 

Quoting Joelle

Did anyone have any helpful suggestions of things I could give?

 

It is really a sweet idea Joelle, but as the others have said, a smile and thank you would be enough.  Also, if you learn some Turkish, it would be greatly appreciated. 

 

If you really feel like giving small tokens, your idea of post cards would probably fine, but no coins.  I don´t like giving sweets as I don´t think they are very healthy....you know tooth decay and blood sugar problems.

 



Edited (5/5/2009) by alameda [added ]

18.       Joelle
5 posts
 06 May 2009 Wed 12:50 pm

 

Quoting smiley

No, I wouldn´t be too keen to give coins or postcards..  Firstly the coins, would be like tipping except that the receiver would not be able to spend it.  Unless the person you are giving to collects foreign coins.  

 

Thank you so much for giving your perspective!  This is exactly the reason I ask... because I would not want to be offensive in a gift, I would just want to show my gratitude.

Also, I know I gift would not be expected from a stranger, but that goes both ways!  If someone shares with me a bit of their culture, I want to do the same for them... not because I have to but because I want to.  Big smile

19.       barba_mama
1629 posts
 26 Jun 2009 Fri 06:57 pm

First of all, I think it´s a GOOD IDEA to bring small gifts with you. I did so for many years and everybody in Turkey who I gave a small gift liked it very much. A lot of Turkish people help others all day long and never get anything back for it. This way you can show your appreciation.

 

What I always bring are a bunch of small, porcelein "wooden shoes". They are typical Dutch, I know a store where I can get a good deal on them, and they fit easily in my bag. They are about the size of a 4 dices.

 

Isn´t there something small that is typical for the area you live in? Believe me, people will like it. The coins might seem too much like money, so that can get a negative reaction (like you are trying to pay them).

20.       barba_mama
1629 posts
 26 Jun 2009 Fri 07:00 pm

By the way, I´m not talking about giving gifts to everybody you meet. I think some of your reactions to his idea are a bit overdrawn. For example, if you go to the same restaurant for a week, and these people give you free tea every time, help you figure out your way around town...things like that, they have really helped you! And you want to show that you appreciate that with a little something extra. What´s wrong with that?

 

My first time in Turkey I had some people who helped me so much, but I didn´t see them the year after that, so I was never able to really thank them extra much. That´s why I´m prepared since then

21.       teaschip
3870 posts
 26 Jun 2009 Fri 07:52 pm

How about a cell phone?Big smile

22.       barba_mama
1629 posts
 26 Jun 2009 Fri 08:14 pm

everybody in Turkey already has a cellphone Cell phone What people in Turkey need is porcelein "wooden shoes" ....there´s a shortage of those in Turkey!

23.       sonunda
5004 posts
 26 Jun 2009 Fri 08:20 pm

 

Quoting teaschip

How about a cell phone?Big smile

 

I´ll take two please-do I just have to be nice and share my lunch?  (but I don´t want wooden shoes thanks)

24.       barba_mama
1629 posts
 26 Jun 2009 Fri 08:23 pm

pfff, so demanding Wink I will also bring a bunch of Dutch cookies, called stroopwafels...you want that instead of the porcelein shoes?

25.       sonunda
5004 posts
 26 Jun 2009 Fri 08:26 pm

 

Quoting barba_mama

pfff, so demanding Wink I will also bring a bunch of Dutch cookies, called stroopwafels...you want that instead of the porcelein shoes?

 

Those´ll do nicely thanks!  (I´m glad you ´get´ our sense of humour!)

 

26.       Trudy
7887 posts
 26 Jun 2009 Fri 08:28 pm

 

Quoting barba_mama

pfff, so demanding Wink I will also bring a bunch of Dutch cookies, called stroopwafels...you want that instead of the porcelein shoes?

 

 Stroopwafels? Yummie (though they get sticky when it´s hot.) What about ´drop´? lol lol



Edited (6/26/2009) by Trudy

27.       barba_mama
1629 posts
 26 Jun 2009 Fri 09:02 pm

 

Quoting Trudy

 

 

 Stroopwafels? Yummie (though they get sticky when it´s hot.) What about ´drop´? lol lol

 

 so now I have to make a list stroopwafels, drop, anybody else?

28.       Trudy
7887 posts
 26 Jun 2009 Fri 09:11 pm

 

Quoting barba_mama

 

 

 so now I have to make a list stroopwafels, drop, anybody else?

 

 Forget the drop (liquorice), many people from other countries dislike them. I was joking.

29.       barba_mama
1629 posts
 26 Jun 2009 Fri 09:50 pm

I know my boyfriend was disguisted when he first tried it, lol. But can we all agree that bringing some small gifts in case you meet people you want to thank in a special way, is a good idea (bringing it back to the topic )

30.       teaschip
3870 posts
 26 Jun 2009 Fri 10:05 pm

 

Quoting Trudy

 

 

 Forget the drop (liquorice), many people from other countries dislike them. I was joking.

 

If you have ever had a fifth of Yagermeister, you will never be able to withstand liquorice or the drop as you call it ever again...<img src='/static/images/smileys//lol.gif' alt='lol'> (fast)  I can´t even stomach the smell now.Puking  Although those dutch cookies sound good...Big smile

31.       Trudy
7887 posts
 26 Jun 2009 Fri 10:13 pm

 

Quoting teaschip

 

 

If you have ever had a fifth of Yagermeister, you will never be able to withstand liquorice or the drop as you call it ever again...<img src='/static/images/smileys//lol.gif' alt='lol'> (fast)  I can´t even stomach the smell now.Puking  Although those dutch cookies sound good...Big smile

 

Come stay with me, Teas and I´ll serve you these delicious wafers any time you want. (And drop for breakfast.... lol lol  )

32.       teaschip
3870 posts
 26 Jun 2009 Fri 10:23 pm

 

Quoting Trudy

 

 

Come stay with me, Teas and I´ll serve you these delicious wafers any time you want. (And drop for breakfast.... lol lol  )

 

 I have been to Curacao and the people were wonderful, went to Aruba and they were not friendly..So are you Dutch hospitable?  Interesting, I learned my ancestors were part Dutch living in Northern Germany...

33.       Trudy
7887 posts
 26 Jun 2009 Fri 10:25 pm

 

Quoting teaschip

 

 

 I have been to Curacao and the people were wonderful, went to Aruba and they were not friendly..So are you Dutch hospitable?  Interesting, I learned my ancestors were part Dutch living in Northern Germany...

 

People from the Dutch Antilles are on paper Dutch but in culture as related as Thai. And of course are we hospitable, it´s only to whom!

 

34.       barba_mama
1629 posts
 26 Jun 2009 Fri 10:33 pm

I agree with the difference in culture between the Dutch islands and The Netherlands itself.

 

As for the mainland... Some of our Dutch customs are seen as inhospitable. For example, we like it when people make a call before they come (in general!) and not stand in front of your door without notice. In Turkey tend to pop up all the time, without calling first. So, my boyfriend was wondering why Dutch people like a call first, whether we don´t like guests or something. I explained that actually, when people call that they will be over in a few hours, we start cleaning the house like crazy, go to the store to buy a cake or something else nice to snack on, and also put some better clothes on than the crap we are normally wearing at home

 

35.       AlphaF
5677 posts
 26 Jun 2009 Fri 10:54 pm

 

Quoting barba_mama

I agree with the difference in culture between the Dutch islands and The Netherlands itself.

 

As for the mainland... Some of our Dutch customs are seen as inhospitable. For example, we like it when people make a call before they come (in general!) and not stand in front of your door without notice. In Turkey tend to pop up all the time, without calling first. So, my boyfriend was wondering why Dutch people like a call first, whether we don´t like guests or something. I explained that actually, when people call that they will be over in a few hours, we start cleaning the house like crazy, go to the store to buy a cake or something else nice to snack on, and also put some better clothes on than the crap we are normally wearing at home

 

A simpler alternative approach to the same social dilemna, involves,

1. keeping the house clean and tidy at all times,

2. keeping a small emergency cake in the fridge, for unexpected guests,

3. keeping company with people who care less for your clothing, but more with what you carry in them.

 

Unless it is a formal occassion, I would not bother announcing my visits to friends. Unless it is for a formal occassion again. I would not bother visiting others than my friends, anyway.

 



Edited (6/26/2009) by AlphaF

36.       barba_mama
1629 posts
 26 Jun 2009 Fri 11:21 pm

It´s just normal in Holland if you call first. Like "Hey, I´m in town, is it okay if I come by in 10 minutes?" I do keep a clean house but sometimes it can be a bit messy with clutter. I don´t mind my books laying all over the place, my opened post on the diner table, and my shoes in the living room. But when somebody comes by, all of that gets chucked in the closet

37.       teaschip
3870 posts
 28 Jun 2009 Sun 09:37 pm

There are many people in the U.S. that are the same way.  It´s only respectable that you phone and let your friends even your family know your going to stop by.  What if their busy or not at home..a wasted trip can be avoided by just being courtious and phoning.  I understand the clean thing as well.  Although I do keep my house clean, I still like to do that last minute sweep.. As for cake, I have only made a cake one time in my life.  I don´t bake...so as long as I have pop (soda) even though I don´t drink it, in my frig and chips I´m doing ok..<img src='/static/images/smileys//lol.gif' alt='lol'> (fast)

38.       teaschip
3870 posts
 28 Jun 2009 Sun 09:41 pm

 

Quoting Trudy

 

 

People from the Dutch Antilles are on paper Dutch but in culture as related as Thai. And of course are we hospitable, it´s only to whom!

 

 

 Well that´s good to know...I don´t think I would ever go back to Aruba.  You would walk into a shop and not even "hello, let me know if I can help you".  The people there were so put off...so I didn´t even drop a dime on that island.

 

Glad to the Netherlands is more friendly, even if your semi selected to whom your friendly too. Big smile

39.       barba_mama
1629 posts
 29 Jun 2009 Mon 08:47 pm

I already notice the difference when I go to Belgium. The shop employees in Holland tend to be friendlier than those in Belgium. Or maybe I just had the "luck" to run into the 20 employees in Belgium that are not nice The only nice ones I met where the Turkish owner of a clothing store and the owner of the hippy-style tea-bar

(39 Messages in 4 pages - View all)
1 2 3 4
Add reply to this discussion




Turkish Dictionary
Turkish Chat
Open mini chat
New in Forums
TLC servers hacked, all user emails & pass...
admin: We removed the user password data from the servers until the issue is ...
E-T: It´s one of the things on my bu...
gokuyum: No. It doesnt make sense. You can say ... yapmak istediğim bi...
T-E
og2009: DÜNYA TOPLUMU VE FELSEFE ... okul ... felsefe ... ....
Holidays in Turkey
: ...
24 HOUR FLASH SALE for learning Turkish e-...
qdemir: ...
Grammar Textbook
qdemir: ...
E-T: I see you have done this before?
harp00n: Bunu ... daha önce de ... Bu konuda iyi olduğun ç...
T-E
og2009: ...
T-E
og2009: ...
coronavirus
og2009: ...
OUR FRIENDS
og2009: ...
Coronavirus
harp00n: ...
Random Pictures of Turkey
Add thumbnails like this to your site
Most commented