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What is this Language? (I See It All the Time)
(16 Messages in 2 pages - View all)
[1] 2
1.       Abla
3647 posts
 28 Nov 2011 Mon 09:16 pm

......Və əslində sənət elmin yeni yollarını açıb göstərdiyi kimi elm də sənətləşir, sərhədlər dağılır və ... mücərrədliyə açıldığı kimi dəqiqliyin və texnika aləminin yeni imkanları ortaya çıxmış olur. ... Görüşlər, vüsallar insanın içini qanatmaz, onu yerdən yerə vurmaz. ... Bu səslər ömrün ən gözəl anlarında gəlirlər və tez də gedirlər. ...

2.       tunci
7149 posts
 28 Nov 2011 Mon 09:20 pm

 

Quoting Abla

......Və əslində sənət elmin yeni yollarını açıb göstərdiyi kimi elm də sənətləşir, sərhədlər dağılır və ... mücərrədliyə açıldığı kimi dəqiqliyin və texnika aləminin yeni imkanları ortaya çıxmış olur. ... Görüşlər, vüsallar insanın içini qanatmaz, onu yerdən yerə vurmaz. ... Bu səslər ömrün ən gözəl anlarında gəlirlər və tez də gedirlər. ...

 

 It seems Azerbaijani Turkish to me...Were you able to  pick some words Abla ?

elenagabriela liked this message
3.       Abla
3647 posts
 28 Nov 2011 Mon 09:26 pm

Yes, sir. If you overlook the ortography it doesn´t look impossible. Does this mean that I know some Azerbaijani, too? (Gee, I never learned a new language in a day.)

elenagabriela and tunci liked this message
4.       tunci
7149 posts
 28 Nov 2011 Mon 09:32 pm

 

Və = ve

əslində= aslında

 sənət = sanat [art]

 elmin= ilm [science] --> ilm+ in [genitive]

yeni yollarını  = yeni yollarını

ilmin yeni yollarını = the new ways of science

açıb = açıp

göstərdiyi = gösterdiği --> göster + dik + i ---> that it [art] shows

 kimi  = kimi [some]

elm də = ilim de

kimi ilim de = and some science

 sənətləşir = sanatlaşır = sanat + laş [ suffix to make nouns transformation ] - to become art [artistic] ---> It becomes art [artistic]

, sərhədlər = serhat = border, boundry - serhatlar = boundries, borders

 dağılır = dağılır --> to scatter, to go away, in this case "to disappear"

so you can put them all together..

 

5.       tunci
7149 posts
 28 Nov 2011 Mon 09:36 pm

 

In my opinion , and it is a general view also that One who knows Turkiye Turkish also able to understand Azerbaijani Turkish. But writing in Azerbaijani Turkish is different as you see on your text.

6.       scalpel
1472 posts
 29 Nov 2011 Tue 07:58 am

 

Quoting tunci

 

 kimi  = kimi [some]

 

 

I know you don´t become irritated (but maybe want to kick me in the stomach.. {#emotions_dlg.unsure}   when I correct you, hocam ..

kimi => gibi (menim kimi = benim gibi / aslan kimi = aslan gibi)

 



Edited (11/29/2011) by scalpel [unwanted smiley]

tunci liked this message
7.       Abla
3647 posts
 29 Nov 2011 Tue 11:59 am

I apologize for my ignorance but I didn´t realize until now how huge area on the map Turkic languages cover. I have an excuse, too. I first learned all those countries as being the South of Soviet Union. Shame on me but the USSR was a mote in our eye for a long time and it was hard to see the world behind it. Cengiz Aytmatov was my favourite writer when I was young. I was fascinated about the land, the people, the horses, the mountains he described. I always thought one day I will visit Frunze (Bişkek?)and Samarkand.

Maybe I will take the senior citizens´ group tour to the Silk Road after 30 years. At least I won´t be confused to see

         кош келиңиздер!

or

         xush kelipsiz!

written in my travel schedule.

8.       si++
3785 posts
 29 Nov 2011 Tue 12:28 pm

Linguistic Affiliation

Azeri (also referred to as Azeri Turkish) or Azerbaijani is a Turkic language in the Altaic family; it belongs to the southwestern Oguz group, together with Anatolian Turkish, Turkmen, and Gagauz. Speakers of these languages can understand each other to varying degrees, depending on the complexity of the sentences and the number of loan words from other languages. Russian loan words have entered Azeri since the nineteenth century, especially technical terms. Several Azeri dialects (e.g., Baku, Shusha, Lenkaran) are entirely mutually comprehensible. Until 1926, Azeri was written in Arabic script, which then was replaced by the Latin alphabet and in 1939 by Cyrillic. With the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Azerbaijan and other Turkic-speaking former Soviet republics reintroduced the Latin alphabet. However, the main body of modern Azeri literature and educational material is still in Cyrillic, and the transition to the Latin alphabet is a time-consuming and expensive process. The generations that learned Russian and read Azeri in Cyrillic still feel more comfortable with Cyrillic. During the Soviet period, linguistic Russification was intensive: although people referred to Azeri as their native tongue, the language many people in the cities mastered was Russian. There were both Azeri and Russian schools, and pupils were supposed to learn both languages. Those who went to Russian schools were able to use Azeri in daily encounters but had difficulty expressing themselves in other areas. Russian functioned as the lingua franca of different ethnic groups, and with the exception of rural populations such as the Talysh, others spoke very little Azeri. Roughly thirteen languages are spoken in Azerbaijan, some of which are not written and are used only in everyday family communication. Azeri is the official language and is used in all spheres of public life.

 

From: http://www.everyculture.com/A-Bo/Azerbaijan.html

 

Azeri people prefer to call their language as "Azeri Turkish" (Not Azerbaijani or something).

9.       Abla
3647 posts
 29 Nov 2011 Tue 12:39 pm

The Cyrillic ortography is a very clever one and I think it is no problem to use it for Turkish also. I noticed is Kyrgyz language only three extra marks were taken into use (for ı, ü and

ŋ if I remember now). But I really wonder the using of Arabic writing. In my opinion they shouldn´t use it for Arabic even, but the rich variety of vowels in Turkic languages must be a real problem if you use Arabic scrift. I will have to see how it looks...



Edited (11/29/2011) by Abla

10.       si++
3785 posts
 29 Nov 2011 Tue 01:03 pm

 

Quoting Abla

The Cyrillic ortography is a very clever one and I think it is no problem to use it for Turkish also. I noticed is Kyrgyz language only three extra marks were taken into use (for ı, ü and

ŋ if I remember now). But I really wonder the using of Arabic writing. In my opinion they shouldn´t use it for Arabic even, but the rich variety of vowels in Turkic languages must be a real problem if you use Arabic scrift. I will have to see how it looks...

 

Can you be more specific? In which ways is it clever?

 

Personally I believe Latin script is well suited to Turkic languages.

 

Again personally I find it hard to decode cyrillic script (I can but I need to spend too much time decoding the words letter by letter) and too confusing (H for N, P for R and C for S for example is a problem for me).

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