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ALL-TIME 15 NOVELS
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1.       niobe
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 01:47 am



Are you a good reader?
What are your 15 best novels?
Here are mine=

1-Aylak Adam By Yusuf Atılgan
2-Ağrıdağı Efsanesi By Yaşar Kemal
3- Timbuktu By Paul Auster
4- The trial By Franz Kafka
5- Ulysses By James Joyce
6- One Hundred Years Solutude By Gabriel Garcia Marquez
7- Lolita By Vladimir Nabokov
8- The Stranger –L’Etranger By Albert Camus
9- The Brothers Karamozof By Fyodor Dostoyevski
10-The Grapes of Wratf By John Steinbeck
11-Les Mots By Jean Paul Sartre
12-To the lighthouse By Virginia Woolf
13-Light in August By William Faulkner
14-Victoria By Knut Hamsun
15-Gazi Paşa By Attila İlhan



2.       Trudy
7887 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 10:22 am

I would love to tell but because most books I read are in Dutch I think it is of no use doing it.

3.       slavica
814 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 04:48 pm

Well, I suppose that most of us read books in their own languages, so I’m not the exception, but I don’t think it is of no use to recommend my favorites, since they must be translated to other languages too, as capital works of world literature.

For me, the only problem is to chose ONLY 15 best novels, but let me try:

War And Peace – Lev Tolstoy
Evgeny Onegin – Alexandr Pushkin
Resurrection - Lev Tolstoy
Anna Karenina – Lev Tolstoy
Quiet Flows the Don - Mikhail Sholokhov
Torrents of Spring - Ivan Turgenyev
Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky
One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich - Alexander Solzhenitsyn
Time of Death - Dobrica Ćosić
Tzar Radovan's Treasure - Jovan Dučić
Death and the Dervish - Mehmed MeÅ¡a Selimović
The Bridge on the Drina - Ivo Andrić
The Citadel – A. J. Cronin
By The River Piedra I Sat Down And Wept - Paulo Coelho
1984 - George Orwell

4.       SuiGeneris
3922 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 04:59 pm

Quoting slavica:


By The River Piedra I Sat Down And Wept - Paulo Coelho
1984 - George Orwell



there are the books i have on my list to be read

5.       duda
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 05:09 pm

Nice topic for book-lovers. But we are still waiting for Trudy to make her list. Until then, my choice:

The Idiot, F. M. Dostoyevsky
The Posessed, F. M. Dostoyevsky
Epic of Gilgamesh
The Master and Margarita, Mikhail Bulgakov
Second book of Migrations (Seobe, knjiga druga), Miloš Crnjanski
A Novel about London (Roman o Londonu), Miloš Crnjanski
Father Bernard the Swell (Bakonja fra-Brne), Simo Matavulj
The Song of Nibelungs (Das Nibelungenlied)
Don Quixote, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
The Magic Mountain (Der Zauberberg), Thomas Mann
Orlando Enraged (Orlando Furioso), Ariosto
Dead Souls, Nikolay Gogol
Pickwick Papers, Charles Dickens
The Life and Extraordinary Adventures of Private Ivan Chonkin, Vladimir Voinovich
The Little Prince (Le Petit Prince), Antoine de Saint Exupéry

6.       slavica
814 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 05:28 pm

Quoting SuiGeneris:

Quoting slavica:


By The River Piedra I Sat Down And Wept - Paulo Coelho
1984 - George Orwell



there are the books i have on my list to be read



Be sure to do that

And you can add Veronika Decides To Die by Paulo Coelho to your list too.

7.       slavica
814 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 05:30 pm

Quoting duda:


The Idiot, F. M. Dostoyevsky
The Posessed, F. M. Dostoyevsky
Epic of Gilgamesh
The Master and Margarita, Mikhail Bulgakov
Second book of Migrations (Seobe, knjiga druga), Miloš Crnjanski
A Novel about London (Roman o Londonu), Miloš Crnjanski
Father Bernard the Swell (Bakonja fra-Brne), Simo Matavulj
The Song of Nibelungs (Das Nibelungenlied)
Don Quixote, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
The Magic Mountain (Der Zauberberg), Thomas Mann
Orlando Enraged (Orlando Furioso), Ariosto
Dead Souls, Nikolay Gogol
Pickwick Papers, Charles Dickens
The Life and Extraordinary Adventures of Private Ivan Chonkin, Vladimir Voinovich
The Little Prince (Le Petit Prince), Antoine de Saint Exupéry



May I add Duda's list to mine?

8.       SuiGeneris
3922 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 05:43 pm

Quoting duda:


The Idiot, F. M. Dostoyevsky
The Posessed, F. M. Dostoyevsky
Epic of Gilgamesh
The Master and Margarita, Mikhail Bulgakov
Second book of Migrations (Seobe, knjiga druga), Miloš Crnjanski
A Novel about London (Roman o Londonu), Miloš Crnjanski
Father Bernard the Swell (Bakonja fra-Brne), Simo Matavulj
The Song of Nibelungs (Das Nibelungenlied)
Don Quixote, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
The Magic Mountain (Der Zauberberg), Thomas Mann
Orlando Enraged (Orlando Furioso), Ariosto
Dead Souls, Nikolay Gogol
Pickwick Papers, Charles Dickens
The Life and Extraordinary Adventures of Private Ivan Chonkin, Vladimir Voinovich
The Little Prince (Le Petit Prince), Antoine de Saint Exupéry



How many of them you have translated?

9.       aenigma x
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 06:04 pm

Wow! What an impossible task! I started to write my list but it is truly impossible for me - especially after reading Slavica and Duda's lists - everything from Tolstoy to Dickens - I added both their lists to mine!!! I would also add all six Jane Austin books to my list.

I agree with Duda about The Little Prince - probably the dearest most cherishished book of mine. A children's book with a deep message for adults. A Turkish translation of the entire book is available here:-

http://arzudurukan.www9.50megs.com/index.htm


10.       SuiGeneris
3922 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 06:13 pm

Quoting slavica:

Quoting duda:


The Idiot, F. M. Dostoyevsky
The Posessed, F. M. Dostoyevsky
Epic of Gilgamesh
The Master and Margarita, Mikhail Bulgakov
Second book of Migrations (Seobe, knjiga druga), Miloš Crnjanski
A Novel about London (Roman o Londonu), Miloš Crnjanski
Father Bernard the Swell (Bakonja fra-Brne), Simo Matavulj
The Song of Nibelungs (Das Nibelungenlied)
Don Quixote, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
The Magic Mountain (Der Zauberberg), Thomas Mann
Orlando Enraged (Orlando Furioso), Ariosto
Dead Souls, Nikolay Gogol
Pickwick Papers, Charles Dickens
The Life and Extraordinary Adventures of Private Ivan Chonkin, Vladimir Voinovich
The Little Prince (Le Petit Prince), Antoine de Saint Exupéry



May I add Duda's list to mine?



People used to read books huh slavica?

11.       duda
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 06:34 pm

Now I would like to add Winnie the Pooh by A.A.Miln. May it be sixteen? Or children books are excluded? Or we should exclude Gilgamesh? (Be sure I didn't translate it, Sui... I do not speak Sumerian... don't have Sumerian font in my PC anyway. )

12.       Elisa
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 06:43 pm

Hmm, I always find these kind of questions rather hard. Same problem with "top 10 albums" for example, I wouldn’t know where to start.. and I'm such a doubter..

Anyway:

F. Scott Fitzgerald – the Great Gatsby
John Irving – The World According to Garp
John Irving – Hotel New Hampshire
Richard Yates – Revolutionary Road
D.H. Lawrence - Lady Chatterley’s Lover
Gustave Flaubert - Madame Bovary
Gerard Reve – De Avonden
Patrick Süskind – The Perfume
Truman Capote – In Cold Blood
J.D. Salinger - Catcher in the Rye
Haruki Murakami - South of the Border, West of the Sun
Donna Tartt - The Secret History

to be continued probably..

13.       SuiGeneris
3922 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 06:44 pm

To Duda and Slavica;

You are like walking libraries!!! Its unbelievable!!!
Now i bend infront of you!

With regards your majesty!

14.       duda
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 07:02 pm

Pardon me, Sui, but I am more a kind of sitting library... If I read less, I'd walk more... And I'd be slim as well.

Liked Elisa's list too... She inspired me to think more of some modern prosaists. My God, so many books, how can one decide? Now I'd like to add Malcolm Lawry and his "Under Vulcano"... and Peter Carey and his "Oscar and Lucinda"... and "The Blind Assasin" by Margaret Atwood... and... will someone stop me? Sui, Slavica, please... just stop me.



P.S. Elisa, suppose you recommend "The Parfume"? I saw it (translated! alas!) here and from the very start I have a feeling it's something worth reading. Can you compare it to something? I would like to hear somebody's personal impressions, for I don't like to read "noncertified" books.

15.       SuiGeneris
3922 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 07:06 pm

Quoting duda:

Pardon me, Sui, but I am more a kind of sitting library... If I read less, I'd walk more... And I'd be slim as well.

Liked Elisa's list too... She inspired me to think more of some modern prosaists. My God, so many books, how can one decide? Now I'd like to add Malcolm Lawry and his "Under Vulcano"... and Peter Carey and his "Oscar and Lucinda"... and "The Blind Assasin" by Margaret Atwood... and... will someone stop me? Sui, Slavica, please... just stop me.



P.S. Elisa, suppose you recommend "The Parfume"? I saw it (translated! alas!) here and from the very start I have a feeling it's something worth reading. Can you compare it to something? I would like to hear somebody's personal impressions, for I don't like to read "noncertified" books.



The Perfume's movie is also made... But mostly they say no better than the book...
Also Duda to the new authors list, you can add Jean Christopher Grange, he has magnificant novels

16.       aenigma x
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 07:13 pm

This is so hard, but have made an attempt to select my favourite 15:-

Tender is the Night - F. Scott Fitzgerald
The Great Gatsby - F. Scott Fitzgerald
Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy
Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austin
Emma - Jane Austin
The Little Prince - Antoine de Saint-Expery
Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte
Great Expectations - Charles Dickens
The Way We Live Now - Anthony Trollope
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest - Ken Kesey
A Passage to India - E. M. Forster
To Kill A Mockingbird - Harper Lee
Rebecca - Daphne du Maurier
Brideshead Revisited - Evelyn Waugh
I, Claudius - Robert Graves

17.       duda
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 07:13 pm

Thanks for the idea, Sui. Though it will be your fault when I became a fat woman...

Aenigma (x) - you made my day with Trollop! Can I guess you are secret lover of Dickens too? (I use to read "Oliver Twist" again and again under my pillow still. )

18.       Elisa
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 07:21 pm

Quoting aenigma x:

Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austin
Emma - Jane Austin
To Kill A Mockingbird - Harper Lee



How could I forget those two!!?? See, my list is a living, everchanging thing

Ohhhh, mr Darcy....

19.       aenigma x
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 07:22 pm

Quoting duda:

Thanks for the idea, Sui. Though it will be your fault when I became a fat woman...

Aenigma (x) - you made my day with Trollop! Can I guess you are secret lover of Dickens too? (I use to read "Oliver Twist" again and again under my pillow still. )




This is an impossible task!! My mind is racing now...Susan Howatch, Henry Fielding, Jonathan Swift .... I missed so many

20.       aenigma x
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 07:24 pm

Quoting Elisa:


Ohhhh, mr Darcy....



"IT is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife."

lol

21.       Elisa
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 07:25 pm

Quoting duda:


P.S. Elisa, suppose you recommend "The Parfume"? I saw it (translated! alas!) here and from the very start I have a feeling it's something worth reading. Can you compare it to something? I would like to hear somebody's personal impressions, for I don't like to read "noncertified" books.



In my opinion and as far as I can tell, The Perfume can't be compared to any other book. It's unique. I'd suggest you to just go and read it, you won't regret it!

Oh and by the way, I haven't seen the movie, I like the image I have in my head from reading the book, I don't want it to get spoiled.
Some people think the movie is good, others hate it, and I just don't want to know

22.       SuiGeneris
3922 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 07:27 pm

Quoting Elisa:

Oh and by the way, I haven't seen the movie, I like the image I have in my head from reading the book, I don't want it to get spoiled.
Some people think the movie is good, others hate it, and I just don't want to know



They were perfect with Lord Of The Rings though

23.       aenigma x
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 07:27 pm

Quoting Elisa:

Oh and by the way, I haven't seen the movie, I like the image I have in my head from reading the book, I don't want it to get spoiled.
Some people think the movie is good, others hate it, and I just don't want to know



Dont you find that with most movies adapted from novels? I always leave the cinema angry that the story has been changed, badly adapted or simply completely different from how I imagined it in my head!!

24.       Elisa
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 07:28 pm

Quoting aenigma x:


This is an impossible task!! .... I missed so many



+ 1

Tom Wolfe for example..

25.       duda
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 07:28 pm

Jonathan Swift! Not fair... And Laurence Sterne... Mark Twain... Elsa Morante...

May it be 115... please? I would like to add some more...

26.       AllTooHuman
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 07:29 pm

Well... Here are my first and second top fifteen list according to the two slightly different definitions of novel.

novel: Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes

1. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
2. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
3. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
4. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
5. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
6. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
7. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
8. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
9. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
10. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
11. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
12. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
13. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
14. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
15. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes

novel: an extended fictional work in prose; usually in the form of a story

1. Crime and Punishment - Dostoyevsky
2. Les Miserables - Victor Hugo (Ah, my dear Jan Valjean!...)
3. The Brothers Karamazov - Dostoyevsky
4. Anna Karenina - Tolstoy
5. For Whom the Bell Tolls - Hemingway
6. The Metamorphosis - Kafka
7. The Trial - Kafka
8. War and Peace - Tolstoy
9. Ulysses - James Joyce
10. Frankenstein - Marry Shelley
11. Search of Lost Time (whole series) - Marcel Proust
12. The Iron Heel - Jack London
13. Modam Bovary - Gustave Flaubert
14. The Grapes of Wratf - John Steinbeck
15. Oblomov - Ivan Goncharov

27.       SuiGeneris
3922 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 07:30 pm

Quoting duda:

Jonathan Swift! Not fair... And Laurence Sterne... Mark Twain... Elsa Morante...

May it be 115... please? I would like to add some more...



Huckelbery Finn

28.       duda
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 07:30 pm

P. S. Thanks, Elisa! I didn't see your post at once. The word "unique" is enough. Sold!

29.       duda
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 07:36 pm

Quoting AllTooHuman:

2. Les Miserables - Victor Hugo (Ah, my dear Jan Valjean!...)



Something is rotten in the state of Denmark?
Or it was Netherlands?

But we omitted Alphonse Daudet and his "Aventures prodigieuses de Tartarin de Tarascon"... French Don Quixote...



30.       aenigma x
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 07:41 pm

Quoting AllTooHuman:

2. Les Miserables - Victor Hugo
10. Frankenstein - Mary Shelley



Yes yes and Bram Stoker's Dracula.. wonderful

31.       AllTooHuman
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 07:44 pm

Quoting aenigma x:

This is so hard, but have made an attempt to select my favourite 15:-

Tender is the Night - F. Scott Fitzgerald
The Great Gatsby - F. Scott Fitzgerald
Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy
Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austin
Emma - Jane Austin
The Little Prince - Antoine de Saint-Expery
Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte
Great Expectations - Charles Dickens
The Way We Live Now - Anthony Trollope
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest - Ken Kesey
A Passage to India - E. M. Forster
To Kill A Mockingbird - Harper Lee
Rebecca - Daphne du Maurier
Brideshead Revisited - Evelyn Waugh
I, Claudius - Robert Graves



appears you have given the Biritish writers preferential treatment.

32.       SuiGeneris
3922 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 07:45 pm

Black Beauty - Anna Sewell

it was my term work in prep class in high school... we used to watch its movie together with my family

33.       aenigma x
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 07:47 pm

Quoting AllTooHuman:


appears you have given the Biritish writers preferential treatment.



I disagree - 9 of the 15 is not bad, considering I am British

34.       AllTooHuman
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 07:49 pm

Quoting aenigma x:

Quoting Elisa:


Ohhhh, mr Darcy....



"IT is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife."

lol



Hehehe... with reference to this point, my favourite opening sentence is placed in Anna Karenina:

"All happy families resemble one another, but each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.

35.       AllTooHuman
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 07:51 pm

Quoting aenigma x:

Quoting AllTooHuman:


appears you have given the Biritish writers preferential treatment.



I disagree - 9 of the 15 is not bad, considering I am British



well.. accepted... be it so...

36.       aenigma x
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 07:51 pm

Quoting AllTooHuman:

Well... Here are my first and second top fifteen list according to the two slightly different definitions of novel.

novel: Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes

1. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
2. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
3. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
4. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
5. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
6. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
7. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
8. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
9. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
10. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
11. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
12. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
13. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
14. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
15. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes

novel: an extended fictional work in prose; usually in the form of a story

1. Crime and Punishment - Dostoyevsky
2. Les Miserables - Victor Hugo (Ah, my dear Jan Valjean!...)
3. The Brothers Karamazov - Dostoyevsky
4. Anna Karenina - Tolstoy
5. For Whom the Bell Tolls - Hemingway
6. The Metamorphosis - Kafka
7. The Trial - Kafka
8. War and Peace - Tolstoy
9. Ulysses - James Joyce
10. Frankenstein - Marry Shelley
11. Search of Lost Time (whole series) - Marcel Proust
12. The Iron Heel - Jack London
13. Modam Bovary - Gustave Flaubert
14. The Grapes of Wratf - John Steinbeck
15. Oblomov - Ivan Goncharov



..appears you have not listed a single novelist from your OWN country

37.       duda
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 07:52 pm

One of the most human books I ever read: "The Book of the Dun Cow" by Walter Wangerin. And maybe "Waterbabies" by Charles Kingsley... Now I am becoming sentimental... it's the fault of the man in yellow coat...

38.       AllTooHuman
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 07:56 pm

Quoting aenigma x:

Quoting AllTooHuman:

Well... Here are my first and second top fifteen list according to the two slightly different definitions of novel.

novel: Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes

1. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
2. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
3. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
4. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
5. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
6. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
7. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
8. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
9. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
10. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
11. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
12. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
13. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
14. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
15. Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes

novel: an extended fictional work in prose; usually in the form of a story

1. Crime and Punishment - Dostoyevsky
2. Les Miserables - Victor Hugo (Ah, my dear Jan Valjean!...)
3. The Brothers Karamazov - Dostoyevsky
4. Anna Karenina - Tolstoy
5. For Whom the Bell Tolls - Hemingway
6. The Metamorphosis - Kafka
7. The Trial - Kafka
8. War and Peace - Tolstoy
9. Ulysses - James Joyce
10. Frankenstein - Marry Shelley
11. Search of Lost Time (whole series) - Marcel Proust
12. The Iron Heel - Jack London
13. Modam Bovary - Gustave Flaubert
14. The Grapes of Wratf - John Steinbeck
15. Oblomov - Ivan Goncharov



..appears you have not listed a single novelist from your OWN country



Because, I am and must be, unlike you, objective. I don't see any Turkish novel among any top-fifteen-list. As back as 120 years or so our own novel tradition goes.

39.       aenigma x
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:01 pm

Quoting AllTooHuman:

Because, I am and must be, unlike you, objective. I don't see any Turkish novel among any top-fifteen-list. As back as 120 years or so our own novel tradition goes.



Piff! How can you decide that my list was not objective. It most certainly was!! You imagined that the majority of my list were British authors when in fact only 9 of 15 were. What next will you accuse me of - bad detective work ....?? lol

40.       duda
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:04 pm

AllTooGoodDetectiveWork, Aenigma... Like Sir Arthur Conan Doyle... Do you like Sherlock Holmes, by the way?

41.       aenigma x
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:05 pm

Quoting duda:

AllTooGoodDetectiveWork, Aenigma... Like Sir Arthur Conan Doyle... Do you like Sherlock Holmes, by the way?



Sherlock Holmes, Agatha Christie.....

42.       slavica
814 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:10 pm

O my god! I completely forgot French Literature!

Victor Hugo – Les Miserables
Victor Hugo – The Hunchback Of Notre-Dame
Gustave Flaubert - Madame Bovary
Stendhal – Red and Black
Alexandre Dumas Son – La dame aux camélias,
Alexandre Dumas Father – The Three Musketeers, The Count of Monte Cristo (and many many others!)

I agree! 115 wouldn’t be enough!

And allow me adding one of my biggest favorites – Jonathan Livingston Seagull by Richard Bach.

And.. and.. talking about novels for children and youth … who doidn’t grow up reading “Robinson Crusoe”…

Oh… how about 1115?

43.       duda
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:11 pm

Quoting aenigma x:

Quoting duda:

AllTooGoodDetectiveWork, Aenigma... Like Sir Arthur Conan Doyle... Do you like Sherlock Holmes, by the way?



Sherlock Holmes, Agatha Christie.....



Or like inspector Javert from Les Miserables?

44.       aenigma x
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:13 pm

Quoting slavica:


Victor Hugo – The Hunchback Of Notre-Dame
Alexandre Dumas Son – La dame aux camélias,
Alexandre Dumas Father – The Three Musketeers, The Count of Monte Cristo (and many many others!)
Jonathan Livingston Seagull[/B] by Richard Bach.



Ouh! I should have included these too!!! Ahhh we will never need another thread here!

45.       SuiGeneris
3922 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:15 pm

Quoting slavica:

O my god! I completely forgot French Literature!



how about Balzac - Father Goriot

46.       SuiGeneris
3922 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:17 pm

Quoting duda:

AllTooGoodDetectiveWork, Aenigma... Like Sir Arthur Conan Doyle... Do you like Sherlock Holmes, by the way?



but wasnt it his assistant Dr. Watson which mostly solve the events

47.       duda
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:19 pm

What about Gabriel Chevallier and his "Clochemerle"? Oooooohhhh... French writers! And Lesage...

48.       AllTooHuman
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:21 pm

Quoting duda:

Quoting aenigma x:

Quoting duda:

AllTooGoodDetectiveWork, Aenigma... Like Sir Arthur Conan Doyle... Do you like Sherlock Holmes, by the way?



Sherlock Holmes, Agatha Christie.....



Or like inspector Javert from Les Miserables?



Hahahahaha! You are killing me, duda! Javert is certainly my favourite, compared to Holmes-like so called detectives. Javert was all too human to be detective, that's why he jumped into the river in the end.

49.       aenigma x
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:22 pm

Quoting AllTooHuman:

that's why he jumped into the river in the end.



50.       duda
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:25 pm

Mon plaisire, Jean...

51.       aenigma x
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:25 pm

I have another children's book to add to my list!

The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame

Awwwwwww

52.       duda
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:27 pm

You stole it from me...

53.       duda
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:30 pm

But admit... you read "Harriette the Spy" when you was a child? Admit...

54.       aenigma x
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:32 pm

Quoting AllTooHuman:

so called detectives.



Shouldn't that read "so-called detectives" ????

55.       duda
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:34 pm

Or SoCalledDetectives... Uhhhh, this is going fast like Midnight Express!

56.       slavica
814 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:34 pm

Quoting SuiGeneris:

To Duda and Slavica;

You are like walking libraries!!! Its unbelievable!!!
Now i bend infront of you!

With regards your majesty!



Dear Sui, in my case, it has something with my age: when I was a child, I didn’t have even television, not to mention video recorders and computers, so reading was my only entertainment. I’ve started reading before I went to school and from this time I didn’t stop. I don’t think there is a book of Alexandre Dumas, Zane Gray, Mark Twaine, Karl May... that I didn’t read. And when I came to highschool, it was matter of honor to discuss works of Dostoyevski, Hesse, (WOW! How could I forget Demian, Sidarta) Camus, Kafka...

Now I bend infront of you for your knowledge about computers

AND literature!

57.       aenigma x
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:35 pm

Quoting duda:

Or SoCalledDetectives... Uhhhh, this is going fast like Midnight Express!



Hehehe! lol I didn't read Hariette the Spy, but I did read a lot of Ian Fleming

58.       duda
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:37 pm

Quote:

Quoting slavica:

[AUOTE SOURCE=SuiGeneris]To Duda and Slavica;

You are like walking libraries!!! Its unbelievable!!!
Now i bend infront of you!

With regards your majesty!



Dear Sui, in my case, it has something with my age: when I was a child, I didn’t have even television, not to mention video recorders and computers, so reading was my only entertainment. I’ve started reading before I went to school and from this time I didn’t stop. I don’t think there is a book of Alexandre Dumas, Zane Gray, Mark Twaine, Karl May... that I didn’t read. And when I came to highschool, it was matter of honor to discuss works of Dostoyevski, Hesse, (WOW! How could I forget Demian, Sidarta) Camus, Kafka...

Now I bend infront of you for your knowledge about computers

AND literature!




Don't reveal our age! We will lose all of our spammers!

59.       aenigma x
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:37 pm

Quoting slavica:

Dear Sui, in my case, it has something with my age: when I was a child, I didn’t have even television, not to mention video recorders and computers, so reading was my only entertainment. I’ve started reading before I went to school and from this time I didn’t stop. I don’t think there is a book of Alexandre Dumas, Zane Gray, Mark Twaine, Karl May... that I didn’t read. And when I came to highschool, it was matter of honor to discuss works of Dostoyevski, Hesse, (WOW! How could I forget Demian, Sidarta) Camus, Kafka...

Now I bend infront of you for your knowledge about computers

AND literature!



Awwwww Slavica! I did the same. In the end my parents would try to limit my reading the way parents now limit their child's computer time! I remember well reading under the bed covers with a torch after "lights out"

PS. Sui, please take care when bending in front of people!

60.       duda
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:39 pm

Lucky you! You had the torch...

61.       slavica
814 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:42 pm

Quoting aenigma x:

Quoting slavica:

Dear Sui, in my case, it has something with my age: when I was a child, I didn’t have even television, not to mention video recorders and computers, so reading was my only entertainment. I’ve started reading before I went to school and from this time I didn’t stop. I don’t think there is a book of Alexandre Dumas, Zane Gray, Mark Twaine, Karl May... that I didn’t read. And when I came to highschool, it was matter of honor to discuss works of Dostoyevski, Hesse, (WOW! How could I forget Demian, Sidarta) Camus, Kafka...

Now I bend infront of you for your knowledge about computers

AND literature!



Awwwww Slavica! I did the same. In the end my parents would try to limit my reading the way parents now limit their child's computer time! I remember well reading under the bed covers with a torch after "lights out"

PS. Sui, please take care when bending in front of people!



Yes, yes, my parents too! And I had OBLIGATION to go out and play with other children 2 hours a day!

62.       SuiGeneris
3922 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:44 pm

Quoting slavica:


Dear Sui, in my case, it has something with my age: when I was a child, I didn’t have even television, not to mention video recorders and computers, so reading was my only entertainment. I’ve started reading before I went to school and from this time I didn’t stop. I don’t think there is a book of Alexandre Dumas, Zane Gray, Mark Twaine, Karl May... that I didn’t read. And when I came to highschool, it was matter of honor to discuss works of Dostoyevski, Hesse, (WOW! How could I forget Demian, Sidarta) Camus, Kafka...

Now I bend infront of you for your knowledge about computers

AND literature!



well dont tell me about age please dear Slavica
do you know when first computer entered to my room? it was my first year in university

Television was invented true but i used to play outside and spanked on ass by my mom becoz of having dirty shirts and pants... i used to climb trees and eat stuff there... cycling with my gang to sea and fight with other gangs

i miss those times...

it has something to do with interest, ofcourse you didnt have more chances but i believe books were not that reachable aswell!!

p.s. i had started reading and writing and some basic calculations at the age of 5 with sesame street

63.       slavica
814 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:45 pm

Quoting duda:

Quoting slavica:

Quoting SuiGeneris:

To Duda and Slavica;

You are like walking libraries!!! Its unbelievable!!!
Now i bend infront of you!

With regards your majesty!



Dear Sui, in my case, it has something with my age: when I was a child, I didn’t have even television, not to mention video recorders and computers, so reading was my only entertainment. I’ve started reading before I went to school and from this time I didn’t stop. I don’t think there is a book of Alexandre Dumas, Zane Gray, Mark Twaine, Karl May... that I didn’t read. And when I came to highschool, it was matter of honor to discuss works of Dostoyevski, Hesse, (WOW! How could I forget Demian, Sidarta) Camus, Kafka...

Now I bend infront of you for your knowledge about computers

AND literature!




Don't reveal our age! We will lose all of our spammers!



Hey, I was talking of MY age! I trust my spammers!

64.       duda
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:47 pm

In fact... no need to worry... I am sure they do not read this thread.

65.       SuiGeneris
3922 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:48 pm

Quoting aenigma x:


PS. Sui, please take care when bending in front of people!



why?

66.       aenigma x
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:53 pm

Quoting SuiGeneris:

Quoting aenigma x:


PS. Sui, please take care when bending in front of people!



why?



Well, bowing in front of someone is one thing, but BENDING in front of someone could be dangerous.... particularly if you find yourself in prison, or perhaps a gay bar

67.       aenigma x
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:55 pm

Quoting duda:

In fact... no need to worry... I am sure they do not read this thread.



Duda please stopppppppp! I am crying with laughter here - you smudged my mascara!! Oh...what the hell, its Sunday - who's going to see me

68.       SuiGeneris
3922 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:56 pm

Quoting aenigma x:

Quoting SuiGeneris:

Quoting aenigma x:


PS. Sui, please take care when bending in front of people!



why?



Well, bowing in front of someone is one thing, but BENDING in front of someone could be dangerous.... particulary if you find yourself in prison, or perhaps a gay bar



Nothing can happen to me easily, i have met BOD hehehe
and i know the people i am bending in front
but thank you for warning

69.       duda
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:57 pm

Ohhhh... Oscar Wilde!

By the way, I was right: spammers DO NOT read this thread. I just got this:

heloo there..how are u..

Which writer should I quote in my answer?

70.       duda
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:59 pm

Dorian Gray... or Bodrian Gray?

71.       aenigma x
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:59 pm

Quoting duda:

Ohhhh... Oscar Wilde!

By the way, I was right: spammers DO NOT read this thread. I just got this:

heloo there..how are u..

Which writer should I quote in my answer?



How could we have forgotten Oscar Wilde??? "A HANDBAG!!!"

I know how you remembered him of course - it was all that bending over!

72.       SuiGeneris
3922 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 09:01 pm

Quoting duda:

Ohhhh... Oscar Wilde!

By the way, I was right: spammers DO NOT read this thread. I just got this:

heloo there..how are u..

Which writer should I quote in my answer?


my prep teacher had told me that, he was gay
her pardon his short stories were nice

73.       SuiGeneris
3922 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 09:03 pm

Quoting duda:

Dorian Gray... or Bodrian Gray?



yeah in the exam of that book i had summerized that story
The Picture of Dorian Gray

74.       aenigma x
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 09:06 pm

I think I should go! It's one thing to trash a thread in Off-Topic, but quite another to trash one in Poetry and Literature!

Slavica!!

I am surprised at you!

75.       duda
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 09:07 pm

Quoting SuiGeneris:

Quoting duda:

Dorian Gray... or Bodrian Gray?



yeah in the exam of that book i had summerized that story
The Picture of Dorian Gray




One "r" is surplus... as much as I could understand it...

76.       slavica
814 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 09:12 pm


niobe… Trudy…




77.       Elisa
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 09:18 pm

Quoting duda:

You stole it from me...



Ahh, I'll give you my copy of Winnie the Pooh tamam?

78.       Elisa
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 09:22 pm

Quoting aenigma x:

I remember well reading under the bed covers with a torch after "lights out"



+1 lol

79.       duda
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 09:23 pm

Only if it's illustrated... with beautiful drawings of Ernest Shepard who illustrated both the Winnie and the Wind!

80.       libralady
5152 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 10:47 pm

Having scanned through the tread I am ashamed to say that I have not read hardly any of the books listed except Jonathan Seagull which I loved! and Lady Chatterley's Lover, the unexpurgated version of course.

My literary list are mostly biographies and true stories(for example Wild Swans, The mysteries of Olga Checkova)and I used to be a Patricia Cornwall fan (no classics here! just blood and gore) and one book I could not put down, was "Silence of the Lambs" by Thomas Harris.

81.       SuiGeneris
3922 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 10:52 pm

Quoting libralady:

one book I could not put down, was "Silence of the Lambs" by Thomas Harris.



this is another good story that is perfectly screened in movies...
heard that 4th one of that series is coming...

82.       libralady
5152 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 10:56 pm

Quoting SuiGeneris:

Quoting libralady:

one book I could not put down, was "Silence of the Lambs" by Thomas Harris.



this is another good story that is perfectly screened in movies...
heard that 4th one of that series is coming...



Having read the book first made the film even better. I am not sure I think there is a fourth film, something about revenge and I dont think this time it is Anthony Hopkins.

83.       niobe
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 11:27 pm

THE BEST OF THE WORLD
THE BEST OF THE CENTURY

According to TIME Magazine worlwide (USA) (1999-2006)

BEST NOVEL OF THE CENTURY=
“Ulysses” by James Joyce (1922)
Runners-Up=
“One Hundred Years of Solitude” by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
“Lolita” by Vladimir Nabokov

THE COMPLETE LIST – TIME Magazine All-Time 100 Novels:
“An American Tragedy” by Theodore dreiser
“Beloved” by toni morrison
“Animal Farm” by George Orwell
“Mrs.Dalloway” by Virginia Woolf
“Herzog” by Saul Bellow
”Invisible Man” by Ralp Ellison
“Gone With the Wind” by Margaret Mitchell
“The Grapes of Wrath” by John Steinbeck
“The Sun Also Rises” by Ernest Hemingway
”To kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee
“To the Lighthouse” by Virginia Woolf
”Tropic of Cancer” by Henry Miller
“Housekeepng” by Marilyne Robinson
“White Teeth” by Zadie Smith
“Loving” by Henry Green
“The blid Assassin” by Margaret Atwood
“Are You There God, It’s Me, Margaret” by Judy Blume
“The Man who loved Childen” by Christina Stead
“A Handful of Dust” by Evelyn Waugh
“A Death in the Family” by James Agee
“Play It As It lays” by Joan Didion
“The Power and the Glory” by Graham Gren
“Go Tell it on the Mountain” by James Baldwin
“The Spy Who Came in from the Cold” by John Le carre
“Dog Soldiers” by Robert Stone
…
…
BEST NONFICTION BOOK OF THE CENTURY =
“The Gulag Archipipelago” by Alexandr Solzhenitsyn (1974)
“The Diary of a Young Girl” by Anne Frank
“The Double Helix” by James Watson

BEST CHILDREN’S BOOK OF THE CENTURY=
“Charlotte’s Web” by E.BWhite (1952)
“The Chronicles of Nornia” by C.S.Lewis
“A Wrinkle in Time” by Madeleine L’ Engle

BEST POEM OF THE CENTURY=
“The Waste Land” by T.S.Eliot (1922)
Runners -Up=
The Second Coming” by W.B.Yeats
Home Burial” by Robert Frost

84.       Trudy
7887 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 11:46 pm

Quoting libralady:

Having scanned through the tread I am ashamed to say that I have not read hardly any of the books listed.

My literary list are mostly biographies and true stories and I used to be a Patricia Cornwall fan (no classics here! just blood and gore).



Same for me. I feel ashamed not only that I haven't read them but there are many authors I even do not know...

So, sorry guys & girls, no list from me.

85.       AllTooHuman
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 11:52 pm

Quoting niobe:




Surprise!!, eh?... Hehehe!

Well, here are the greatest novels of all time.

The greatest novels of all time

1. Don Quixote - Cervantes
2. War and Peace - Tolstoy
3. Ulysses - Joyce
4. In Search of Lost Time - Proust
5. The Brothers Karamazov - Dostoevsky
6. Moby Dick - Melville
7. Madame Bovay - Flaubert
8 Middlemarch - George Eliot
9. The Magic Mountain - Mann
10. The Tale of Genji - Lady Murasaki
11. Emma - Austen
12. Bleak house - Dickens
13. Anna Karenina - Tolstoy
14. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Twain
15. Tom Jones - Fielding
16. Great Expectations - Dickens
17. Absolom, Absolom - Faulkner
18. The Ambassadors - HenryJames
19. One Hundred Years of Solitude - Marquez
20. The GReat Gatsby- Fitzgerald
21. To the Lighthouse - Woolf
22. Crime and Punishment - Dostoevsky
23. The Sound and the Fury - Faulkner
24. Vanity Fair - Thackeray
25. Invisble Man - Ellison
26. Finnegan's Wake - Joyce
27. The Man Without Qulaities - Musil
28. Gravity's Rainbow - Pynchon
29. The Portrait of a Lady - Henry James
30. Women in Love - Lawrence
31. The Red and the Black - Stendahl
32. Tristram Shandy - Sterne
33. Dead Souls - Gogol
34. Tess of the D'Urbevilles - Hardy
35. Buddenbrooks - Hardy
36. Le Pere Goirot - Balzac
37. A Portrait of the Artitst as a Young Man - Joyce
38. Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte
39. The Tin Drum - Grass
40. Molloy Malone Dies, The Unnameable - Beckett
41. Pride and Prejudice - Austen
42. The Scarlet Letter - Hawthorne
43. Fathers and Sons - Turgenev
44. Nostromo - Conrad
45. Beloved - Morrison
46. An American TRagedy - Dreiser
47. Lolita - Nabokov
48. The Golden Notebook - Lessing
49. Clarrissa - Richardson
50. Dream of the Red Chamber - Cao Xueqin
51. The Trial - Kafka
52. Jane Erye - Charlotte Bronte
53. The Red Badge of Courage - Crane
54. The GRapes of Wrath - Steinbeck
55. Petersburg - Bely
56. Things Fall apart - Achebe
57. The Princess of cleves - Lafayette
58. The Stranger - Camus
59. My Antonia - Cather
60. The coutnerfeiters - Gide
61. The Age of Innocence - Wharton
62. The Good Soldier - Ford
63. The Awakening - Chopin
64. A Passage to India - Forster
65. Herzog - Bellow
66. Germinal - Zola
67. Call it Sleep - Henry Roth
68. U.S.A. Trilogy - Dos Passos
69. Hunger - Hamsun
70. Berlin Alexanderplatz- Doblin
71. Cities of Salt - Munif
72. The Death of Artemio Cruz - Fuentes
73. A Farwell to Arms - Hemmingway
74. Brideshead Revisited - Waugh
75. The LAst chronicle of Barset - Trollope
76. The Pickwick Papers - Dickens
77. Robinson Crusoe - Defoe
78. The sorrows of Young Werther - Goethe
79. Candide - Voltaire
80. Native Son - Wright
81. Under the Volcano - Lowry
82. Oblomov - Goncharov
83. Their eyes Were Watching God - Hurston
84. Waverly - Scott
85. Snow country - Kawabata
86. 1984 - Orwell
87. The Betrothed - Manzoni
88. The Last of the Mohicans - Cooper
89. Uncle Tom's Cabin - Stowe
90. Les Miserables - Hugo
91. On the Road - Kerouac
92. Frankenstien - Shelley
93. The Leopard - Lampedusa
94. The Catcher in the Rye - Salinger
95. The Woman in the White - Collins
96. The Good Soldier Svejk - Hasek
97. Dracula - Stoker
98. The Three Musketeers - Dumas
99. The Hound of the Baskervilles - Doyle
100.Gone with the Wind - Mitchell

86.       aenigma x
0 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 11:57 pm

Quoting libralady:

for example Wild Swans



I loved Wild Swans (Jung Chang). I dont know why but of all the harrowing things that happened, it was the grandmothers foot-binding which really stuck in my mind!

Ouchhhhhhh!

87.       libralady
5152 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 12:27 am

Quoting aenigma x:

Quoting libralady:

for example Wild Swans



I loved Wild Swans (Jung Chang). I dont know why but of all the harrowing things that happened, it was the grandmothers foot-binding which really stuck in my mind!

Ouchhhhhhh!



It was heart rendereing in places and that lead me to stop reading novels and start reading about people and their lives - so Patricia Cornwall was out of the picture or off the shelves!!

Another Chinese related book was 'Falling Leaves: The Memoir of an Unwanted Chinese Daughter
by Adeline Yen Mah' and I am not ashamed to say this one made me cry not something I admit to lightly

88.       ramayan
2633 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 01:19 am

My universities by maxim gorki
French liutenants woman by john fowles
Great expecations by Charles Dickens
A love episode by emile zola
Crime and punishment by dostoyevsky
Wuthering heights by emily bronte
A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway
George orwell 1984
Black Coffee" by Agatha Christie


Mehmet my hawk by yaşar kemal
Sevdalinka by ayşe kulin
4th murad by yavuz bahadıroglu
Çanakkale mahşeri(the last judgement in Çanakkale) by mehmed Niyazi
Şu çılgın Türkler by Turgut özakman(not really good)
Leyla ile mecnun İskender pala

89.       catwoman
8933 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 01:41 am

Here are some good books, not novels though (who has time for that! ). Take a look:

Richard Wrangham, Dale Paterson - Demonic Males
Jackson Katz - The Macho Paradox
Gary Brooks - The Centerfold Syndrome

90.       niobe
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 01:48 am


All Nobel Laureates in Literature
The Nobel Prize in Literature has been awarded to 103 persons since 1901.
Jump down to: | 1980 | 1960 | 1940 | 1920 | 1901 |
• 2006 - Orhan Pamuk
• 2005 - Harold Pinter
• 2004 - Elfriede Jelinek
• 2003 - J.M. Coetzee
• 2002 - Imre Kertész
• 2001 - V.S. Naipaul
• 2000 - Gao Xingjian
• 1999 - Günter Grass
• 1998 - José Saramago
• 1997 - Dario Fo
• 1996 - Wislawa Szymborska
• 1995 - Seamus Heaney
• 1994 - Kenzaburo Oe
• 1993 - Toni Morrison
• 1992 - Derek Walcott
• 1991 - Nadine Gordimer
• 1990 - Octavio Paz
• 1989 - Camilo José Cela
• 1988 - Naguib Mahfouz
• 1987 - Joseph Brodsky
• 1986 - Wole Soyinka
• 1985 - Claude Simon
• 1984 - Jaroslav Seifert
• 1983 - William Golding
• 1982 - Gabriel García Márquez
• 1981 - Elias Canetti
• 1980 - Czeslaw Milosz
• 1979 - Odysseus Elytis
• 1978 - Isaac Bashevis Singer
• 1977 - Vicente Aleixandre
• 1976 - Saul Bellow
• 1975 - Eugenio Montale
• 1974 - Eyvind Johnson, Harry Martinson
• 1973 - Patrick White
• 1972 - Heinrich Böll
• 1971 - Pablo Neruda
• 1970 - Alexandr Solzhenitsyn
• 1969 - Samuel Beckett
• 1968 - Yasunari Kawabata
• 1967 - Miguel Angel Asturias
• 1966 - Samuel Agnon, Nelly Sachs
• 1965 - Mikhail Sholokhov
• 1964 - Jean-Paul Sartre
• 1963 - Giorgos Seferis
• 1962 - John Steinbeck
• 1961 - Ivo Andric
• 1960 - Saint-John Perse
• 1959 - Salvatore Quasimodo
• 1958 - Boris Pasternak
• 1957 - Albert Camus
• 1956 - Juan Ramón Jiménez
• 1955 - Halldór Laxness
• 1954 - Ernest Hemingway
• 1953 - Winston Churchill
• 1952 - François Mauriac
• 1951 - Pär Lagerkvist
• 1950 - Bertrand Russell
• 1949 - William Faulkner
• 1948 - T.S. Eliot
• 1947 - André Gide
• 1946 - Hermann Hesse
• 1945 - Gabriela Mistral
• 1944 - Johannes V. Jensen
• 1943 - The prize money was with 1/3 allocated to the Main Fund and with 2/3 to the Special Fund of this prize section
• 1942 - The prize money was with 1/3 allocated to the Main Fund and with 2/3 to the Special Fund of this prize section
• 1941 - The prize money was with 1/3 allocated to the Main Fund and with 2/3 to the Special Fund of this prize section
• 1940 - The prize money was with 1/3 allocated to the Main Fund and with 2/3 to the Special Fund of this prize section
• 1939 - Frans Eemil Sillanpää
• 1938 - Pearl Buck
• 1937 - Roger Martin du Gard
• 1936 - Eugene O'Neill
• 1935 - The prize money was with 1/3 allocated to the Main Fund and with 2/3 to the Special Fund of this prize section
• 1934 - Luigi Pirandello
• 1933 - Ivan Bunin
• 1932 - John Galsworthy
• 1931 - Erik Axel Karlfeldt
• 1930 - Sinclair Lewis
• 1929 - Thomas Mann
• 1928 - Sigrid Undset
• 1927 - Henri Bergson
• 1926 - Grazia Deledda
• 1925 - George Bernard Shaw
• 1924 - Wladyslaw Reymont
• 1923 - William Butler Yeats
• 1922 - Jacinto Benavente
• 1921 - Anatole France
• 1920 - Knut Hamsun
• 1919 - Carl Spitteler
• 1918 - The prize money was allocated to the Special Fund of this prize section
• 1917 - Karl Gjellerup, Henrik Pontoppidan
• 1916 - Verner von Heidenstam
• 1915 - Romain Rolland
• 1914 - The prize money was allocated to the Special Fund of this prize section
• 1913 - Rabindranath Tagore
• 1912 - Gerhart Hauptmann
• 1911 - Maurice Maeterlinck
• 1910 - Paul Heyse
• 1909 - Selma Lagerlöf
• 1908 - Rudolf Eucken
• 1907 - Rudyard Kipling
• 1906 - Giosuè Carducci
• 1905 - Henryk Sienkiewicz
• 1904 - Frédéric Mistral, José Echegaray
• 1903 - Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson
• 1902 - Theodor Mommsen
• 1901 - Sully Prudhomme

91.       Dilara
1153 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 02:54 am

For me the best (therefore my favorites) are :

1 The Tunnel ( Ernesto Sábato )

2 The Foreigner (Albert Camus) Master piece!

3 One hundred years of loneliness" (Gabriel García Márquez)

4 Virgins of Paradise (Barbara Wood)

5 The Alchemist (Paulo Coelho)

6 Diario de un Mago (Paulo Coelho)

7 Veinte Poemas de amor y una canción desesperada (Pablo Neruda) - chilean poet-

8 Martín Rivas (Alberto Blest Ghana ) - chilean writer-

9 "La Cabaña del Tío Tom "

10 "The Talented Mr. Ripley (Patricia Highsmith)

11 "The House of Spirits" (Isabel Allende)-chilean writer-

12 "El perfume"

13 " El lobo estepario" (Herman Hesse)

14 "Corazón" (Edmundo d' Amicis) I was a little girl when I read it and really touched me

15 "Los Viejos puentes de madera" ( Robert James Waller)

92.       slavica
814 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:06 am

Quoting Dilara:


7 Veinte Poemas de amor y una canción desesperada (Pablo Neruda) - chilean poet-



It would be No. 1 on my list if we didn't talk of novels

93.       natiypuspi
435 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:58 am

Can I add some more, even if they aren't novels:

- "Arabian Nights" or "1001 Nights"
- "The Art of War" (Sun Tzu)
- "Little Women" (Louise May Alcott)
- "Doña Flor and her two husbands" (Jorge Amado)
- I ching
- "Classicals" (Confucius)
- "The name of the Rose" (Umberto Eco)

94.       Elisa
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 09:44 am

Forgot another one:

American Psycho by Brett Easton Ellis

ps: this time I've seen the movie, it's absolutely nothing like the book......

95.       zigot
12 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 10:59 am

gabriel garcia marquez -one hundred years of solitude 8 i dont think any other novel could be better than this)

paul auster - the book of illusions

dostoeyevsky - crime and punishment

steinbeck - of mice and men

milan kundera - the unbearable lightness of being

..these are my favoruite 5 one

and of course there are really good turkish novels but you can not find any of them except novels of orhan pamuk and yasar kemal

96.       juliacernat
424 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 11:33 am

merhaba!
as the universal library has unlimited resources and therefore selecting the "best"/"most read"/"most popular" 15 books seems unrealistic, I propose to have an open list of recommendations

mine are the following:
Amin Maalouf- Leo Africanus and Balthasar`s Odyssey
Sadegh Hedayat- The Blind Owl (BUF-e KUR)
Rudolf Otto- The Holly
Mircea Eliade- Sacred and Profane
Umberto Eco- The Name of the Rose
Mikhail Bulgakov- The Master and MArgarita
Hermann Hesse- Steppenwolf and The Glass Bead Game (Magister Ludi)
Jose Saramago- The Gospel According to Jesus Christ and All the Names
Ismail Kadare- The General of the Dead Army
N.H. Kleinbaum- Dead Poets Society
Milan Kundera- Ludicrous Loves
Pascal Bruckner- The Art of Loving
Marguerite Duras- L`Amant
Carlos Ruiz Zafon- The Shadow of the Wind
Peter Beagle- The Last Unicorn and Fine and Private Place

97.       duda
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 01:14 pm

Quoting Trudy:

Quoting libralady:

Having scanned through the tread I am ashamed to say that I have not read hardly any of the books listed.

My literary list are mostly biographies and true stories and I used to be a Patricia Cornwall fan (no classics here! just blood and gore).



Same for me. I feel ashamed not only that I haven't read them but there are many authors I even do not know...

So, sorry guys & girls, no list from me.




I suspect Oswald Spangler was right in his "Decline of the West". In my country we just couldn't finish grammar school without reading ALL classics and the most of contemporary writers... starting from "Iliad" and "Odyssey" and finishing with the last winner of Nobel prize... Anyway, I add Spengler to the list... philosophy, but readable like any novel... and useful, I daresay.

98.       duda
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 01:21 pm

Quoting AllTooHuman:


35. Buddenbrooks - Hardy



AllTooWrong... Buddenbrooks were written by Thomas Mann. What happened to your erudition?

99.       reBooped
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 02:40 pm

Difficult to keep it to 15 - but here are some of my favourites from the age of about 5 upwards :

'Black Beauty' ~ Anna Sewell
'Pippi Longstocking' ~ Astrid Lindgren
'Adventures of Tom Sawyer' ~ Mark Twain
'The Wind in the Willows' ~ Kenneth Grahame
'David Copperfield' ~ Charles Dickens
'Gullivers Travels' ~ Jonathan Swift
'The Secret Garden' ~ Frances Hodgson Burnett
'Tai Pan' ~ Charles Clavell
'Papillon' ~ Henri Charriere
'Brideshead Revisited' ~ Evenlyn Waugh
'Rebecca' ~ Daphne du Maurier
'Of Mice and Men' ~ John Steinbeck
'To Kill a Mockingbird' ~ Harper Lee
'Lord of the Flies' ~ William Goldring
'The Hobbit' ~ J R R Tolkien
'Sala's Gift':My Mother's Holocaust Story ~Anna Krichner
'Cold Mountain' ~ Charles Frazier
'Pride and Prejudice' ~ Jane Austen
'One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest' ~ Ken Kesey

100.       Elisa
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 02:50 pm

Quoting reBooped:

'Lord of the Flies' ~ William Goldring



Thanks for remembering me of that one dear!

101.       reBooped
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 02:52 pm

My pleasure

102.       Trudy
7887 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 02:53 pm

Quoting duda:

In my country we just couldn't finish grammar school without reading ALL classics and the most of contemporary writers... starting from "Iliad" and "Odyssey" and finishing with the last winner of Nobel prize... .



Of course I had to read classical literature for secondary school, but Dutch ones. And Nobel prize winners were not compulsory, they had other measurements: I had to read books from the middle ages, Renaissance, era of Voltaire (don't know the English word), between 1850 - 1940 and after 1940. But all Dutch writers. And Iliad or Odyssey was only when you had Greek lessons, which I didn't.

The books I read then are absolutely not my favourites, I hated reading them!

103.       duda
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:03 pm

Quoting Trudy:

And Iliad or Odyssey was only when you had Greek lessons, which I didn't.

The books I read then are absolutely not my favourites, I hated reading them!



I was in mathematic school, but we had to read Iliad and Odyssey... as Slavica said, it was not only for a mark; it was a matter of honour... obviously there is big difference in our cultures and education systems. For we enjoyed reading clssics.

104.       Elisa
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:05 pm

Quoting Trudy:

Quoting duda:

In my country we just couldn't finish grammar school without reading ALL classics and the most of contemporary writers... starting from 'Iliad' and 'Odyssey' and finishing with the last winner of Nobel prize... .



Of course I had to read classical literature for secondary school, but Dutch ones.



We had Dutch ones in Dutch classes, but also some classical Greek stuff for example.
And we had (classical) French literature in French classes, and English ones in English classes..
It's strange that your school system stressed so much on "just Dutch".

ps: I never had latin or greek either.

105.       duda
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:10 pm

Or it's the differences between students... which I conclude from Elisa's post. Thanks, Elisa! I didn't know you are from Netherlands, so I draw away my words. My opinion about Duch students doesn't refer to you. We had bad students who hated clasics too...

106.       Trudy
7887 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:11 pm

Quoting Elisa:

We had Dutch ones in Dutch classes, but also some classical Greek stuff for example.
And we had (classical) French literature in French classes, and English ones in English classes..
It's strange that your school system stressed so much on "just Dutch".

ps: I never had latin or greek either.



In French classes we had to read French literature yes, I never finished Francoise Sagan.... In English we had to read English literature - wow, what a nice video's there were of all those books . In German I never had to read books because as soon as possible I skipped that, so the literature exams where not for me.

Do understand me correct, I love reading but when the word 'compulsory' comes, I refuse.

107.       Elisa
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:15 pm

Quoting duda:

I didn't know you are from Netherlands,



Correction: I'm Belgian

108.       Trudy
7887 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:18 pm

Quoting duda:

We had bad students who hated clasics too...



A student who hates to read compulsory books is a bad student? What a prejudice!

109.       Elisa
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:20 pm

Quoting duda:

We had bad students who hated clasics too...



You're right, it's a matter of taste. And "les goûts et les couleurs..."

My favourite literature has always been Anglo/American. I read and like other books as well of course, but I always return to the English stuff..

110.       duda
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:30 pm

Quoting Trudy:



A student who hates to read compulsory books is a bad student? What a prejudice!




Very simple formula: if you don't read, you can't get good mark. If you don't have good marks, you can't join the University. If you don't join the University, you can't become a teacher.

Pride or prejudice, that is the question... lol

111.       aenigma x
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:34 pm

If you label them as "classics" I think its an instant turn-off to some people! "Classics" are a wide range of novels which have have become regarded as such because they are so wonderfully written!

People imagine them all to be "heavy going" when in fact they are all diverse and unique.

112.       reBooped
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:36 pm

Love of reading comes from chosing books(whatever kind) that you enjoy - not those which you are made to read - at school, college wherever

113.       duda
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:37 pm

Quoting aenigma x:

If you label them as "classics" I think its an instant turn-off to some people! "Classics" are a wide range of novels which have have become regarded as such because they are so wonderfully written!

People imagine them all to be "heavy going" when in fact they are all diverse and unique.



Absolutely right, Aenigma! But they will never know what good stuff they have missed.

114.       Trudy
7887 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:38 pm

Quoting duda:

Quoting Trudy:



A student who hates to read compulsory books is a bad student? What a prejudice!




Very simple formula: if you don't read, you can't get good mark. If you don't have good marks, you can't join the University. If you don't join the University, you can't become a teacher.

Pride or prejudice, that is the question... lol



Still prejudice. You don't know the schoolsystem in the Netherlands and use your own standards for judging it. Getting good marks (and thus going to university) is also possible with other things, writing papers, essays, having speeches in front of the complete school etcetera.

115.       Trudy
7887 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:38 pm

Quoting reBooped:

Love of reading comes from chosing books(whatever kind) that you enjoy - not those which you are made to read - at school, college wherever



Exactly what I mean!

116.       reBooped
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:39 pm

Quote Duda : Pride or prejudice, that is the question...


...Hehehe ..thought the question was ...'To be or not to be'...

117.       duda
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:41 pm

Those who read both books will recognize my paraphraze anyway... Maybe I should have written: "Read or not to read"...

118.       reBooped
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:43 pm

errrm ....I was joking Duda

119.       duda
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:48 pm

Quoting reBooped:

errrm ....I was joking Duda



I know. But maybe some other people are wondering now... "Which two books?"

120.       aenigma x
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:50 pm

Quoting duda:

Quoting reBooped:

errrm ....I was joking Duda



I know. But maybe some other people are wondering now... "Which two books?"



If they are wondering THAT, then they must be your spammers venturing into the Forum arena

121.       duda
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:52 pm

Not mine... but maybe somebody other's? What do you think?

122.       aenigma x
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:53 pm

Quoting duda:

Not mine... but maybe somebody other's? What do you think?



Probably ! Offfff I dont like change! There was a time when spammers knew their place!!!

PS Cant believe we missed out Thomas Hardy yesterday

123.       SuiGeneris
3922 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:54 pm

Quoting duda:

Not mine... but maybe somebody other's? What do you think?



only Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson can solve this problem!!!

124.       slavica
814 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:54 pm

Quoting Trudy:

Quoting duda:

In my country we just couldn't finish grammar school without reading ALL classics and the most of contemporary writers... starting from 'Iliad' and 'Odyssey' and finishing with the last winner of Nobel prize... .



Of course I had to read classical literature for secondary school, but Dutch ones. And Nobel prize winners were not compulsory, they had other measurements: I had to read books from the middle ages, Renaissance, era of Voltaire (don't know the English word), between 1850 - 1940 and after 1940. But all Dutch writers. And Iliad or Odyssey was only when you had Greek lessons, which I didn't.

The books I read then are absolutely not my favourites, I hated reading them!



If we were reading only Serbian classics, we would stay handicaped not knowing anything about the treasure of world literature. (Although our own literature is rather capacious, giving the fact it exists from the end 12th century.)

Some pupils didn't like many of the books we had to read, but we've got a habbit of reading QUALITY literature, they made us curious to discover other world classic, not only the ones we had to read. And, as I said before, we were proud to discuss good books with our friends, instead of other kinds of entairtenmant.

It was not easy every time to read the book you didn't want to read, but later we never regreted! This became a part of our common culture.

The same thing with learning foreign languages: I was desperate when I had to learn Russian in school. But now, after reading most of mastepieces of Russian literature in original, I would never change Russian for any other language in the world!

125.       duda
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 04:02 pm

Quoting slavica:



It was not easy every time to read the book you didn't want to read, but later we never regreted! This became a part of our common culture.



You had the point!

And we wrote essays and newspaper articles too. Though I admit that many of our schools didn't stimulate rhetorics. Anyway, I know only a few people who don't love reading.

126.       SuiGeneris
3922 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 04:07 pm

Quoting duda:

Quoting slavica:



It was not easy every time to read the book you didn't want to read, but later we never regreted! This became a part of our common culture.



You had the point!

And we wrote essays and newspaper articles too. Though I admit that many of our schools didn't stimulate rhetorics. Anyway, I know only a few people who don't love reading.



Totatlly true... i remember the times that i was reading the first book - Fellowship of the Ring- of Lord of the Rings, Tolkien was just describing a garden in just 40 pages or more... i got really bored... while passing those parts... but after finishing the book.. you are just king of the world, you have the ring to carry to Gondor!

Reading book is really important... whatever you are going to do... to get a viewpoint, to get vocabulary for writing and a style of speech maybe or writing style...
We have to read...

127.       slavica
814 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 04:17 pm

Quoting SuiGeneris:


Reading book is really important... whatever you are going to do... to get a viewpoint, to get vocabulary for writing and a style of speech maybe or writing style...
We have to read...



EXACTLY!

Taking care, of course, of WHAT do we read. Reading Dostoyevski and reading Daniela Still could never be the same

128.       aenigma x
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 04:23 pm

Quoting slavica:

EXACTLY!

Taking care, of course, of WHAT do we read. Reading Dostoyevski and reading Daniela Still could never be the same



I dont know - even reading Danielle Steele is better than not reading at all! At least it develops a reading habit!

129.       SuiGeneris
3922 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 04:37 pm

Quoting slavica:

Quoting SuiGeneris:


Reading book is really important... whatever you are going to do... to get a viewpoint, to get vocabulary for writing and a style of speech maybe or writing style...
We have to read...



EXACTLY!

Taking care, of course, of WHAT do we read. Reading Dostoyevski and reading Daniela Still could never be the same



you have to read them aswell, to understand the difference between them aswell...

130.       slavica
814 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 04:44 pm

Quoting SuiGeneris:

Quoting slavica:

Quoting SuiGeneris:


Reading book is really important... whatever you are going to do... to get a viewpoint, to get vocabulary for writing and a style of speech maybe or writing style...
We have to read...



EXACTLY!

Taking care, of course, of WHAT do we read. Reading Dostoyevski and reading Daniela Still could never be the same



you have to read them aswell, to understand the difference between them aswell...



OK... maybe one or two, just to see difference

131.       reBooped
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 05:00 pm

Quoting aenigma x:

Quoting slavica:

EXACTLY!

Taking care, of course, of WHAT do we read. Reading Dostoyevski and reading Daniela Still could never be the same



I dont know - even reading Danielle Steele is better than not reading at all! At least it develops a reading habit!




I agree -it is better to read anything than nothing... there should be no 'snobbery' attached to book selections - we all have different 'tastes'

132.       niobe
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 11:50 pm

As Slavica said, Reading book is really important...
He who reads literature, enjoys arts, is a well-mannered, cultured and good person, according to scientists..

133.       Dilara
1153 posts
 20 Feb 2007 Tue 05:06 am

Quoting slavica:

Quoting Dilara:


7 Veinte Poemas de amor y una canción desesperada (Pablo Neruda) - chilean poet-



It would be No. 1 on my list if we didn't talk of novels



Really?? I am glad you like Pablo Neruda as well ! but Chilean people has not actually realized HOW important he is in the Poetry Field all over the world! =(
According to me , however, the english translation of his poems are not very accurate , I just "feel" the real meaning of his words in spanish...well actually poetry is so hard to translate dont you think?
No matter how many times I read poem XX , I feel the same excitement and emotion! as we would say in spanish (I cant find the english words now ) ¡ Siento un nudo en la garganta !
His poetry is eternal to me ...
Dilara

134.       slavica
814 posts
 20 Feb 2007 Tue 09:45 pm

Quoting Dilara:

Quoting slavica:

Quoting Dilara:


7 Veinte Poemas de amor y una canción desesperada (Pablo Neruda) - chilean poet-



It would be No. 1 on my list if we didn't talk of novels



Really?? I am glad you like Pablo Neruda as well ! but Chilean people has not actually realized HOW important he is in the Poetry Field all over the world! =(
According to me , however, the english translation of his poems are not very accurate , I just 'feel' the real meaning of his words in spanish...well actually poetry is so hard to translate dont you think?
No matter how many times I read poem XX , I feel the same excitement and emotion! as we would say in spanish (I cant find the english words now ) ¡ Siento un nudo en la garganta !
His poetry is eternal to me ...
Dilara



Yes, Dilara, I am a big Pablo Neruda lover and I’m sure I share opinnion of all poetry lovers conceiving him one of the greatest world poets. His poems are real masterpieces and there is no anthology of love poetry without at least his poem XX (I Can Write the Saddest Poem Tonight). I just LOVE this poem and, as you said, no matter how many times I read it, I feel the same excitement. Unfortunately, I don’t understand Spanish, so I can only imagine how wonderful it sounds on it original language!

We have a topic about Pablo Neruda at Turkish Class which is – what a shame! – lost among General/Off topic after cleaning Poetry Forums of non-Turkish poetry. Now, not having proper moderators, we have masterpieces of our members in Poetry and Literature Category and great Pablo Neruda in Off topics

135.       slavica
814 posts
 20 Feb 2007 Tue 09:47 pm

Quoting reBooped:

Quoting aenigma x:

Quoting slavica:

EXACTLY!

Taking care, of course, of WHAT do we read. Reading Dostoyevski and reading Daniela Still could never be the same



I dont know - even reading Danielle Steele is better than not reading at all! At least it develops a reading habit!




I agree -it is better to read anything than nothing... there should be no 'snobbery' attached to book selections - we all have different 'tastes'



With full respect for everyone’s taste, I can’t agree that it is better to read anything than nothing. Maybe Danielle Steele is not a good example, but there are so many books with no message, no meaning, books having just a bad influence to the reader, that it is bettter to read nothing than read them.

And it has nothing with „snoberry“ and „tastes“, but with the quality of the literature.

Just as food: tastes are different, yes, but some kinds of food are just not healthy... (quoting Duda )

136.       aenigma x
0 posts
 20 Feb 2007 Tue 10:07 pm

Haha! We will have to agree to disagree, Slavica. I believe reading is a habit which needs to be acquired and the more you read, the more likely you are to gravitate to the classics.

Personally, I would rather see a child reading an "unworthy" book than playing a computer game...

137.       Dilara
1153 posts
 20 Feb 2007 Tue 10:16 pm

Thank you Slavica! I cant believe Pablo Neruda is in "off topic" either! what other latin poets do you know or like?
Thank you for the link I will post more unknown information about Pablo Neruda and my personal translations of his poems on the thread dedicated to him which , I hope , one turkish native speaker can translate into turkish because I found several mistakes in the english translations.
You know for me being Chilean, It is a pleasure to see people from all over the world loving him who was born in a remote country like Chile!!
Dilara

138.       reBooped
0 posts
 21 Feb 2007 Wed 12:43 am

Quote:

Quote Slavica

And it has nothing with „snoberry“ and „tastes“, but with the quality of the literature.

Just as food: tastes are different, yes, but some kinds of food are just not healthy... (quoting Duda )




You and I shall have to agree to differ on this - reading is essential for all and is not just about quality of literature. For a non-reader the classics could seem very 'heavy' going and would put off many - whereas starting to read anything hopefully will develop a reading habit. Once someone starts to read for enjoyment, I believe that in time they will expand the kinds of books read - and probably 'progress'onto the classics.

139.       slavica
814 posts
 21 Feb 2007 Wed 02:32 am

Quoting Dilara:

what other latin poets do you know or like?



Gabriela Mistral, Borges, Octavio Paz... but I’m sure there are more valuable, but not very well known Latin American authors. Maybe you could introduce us to their works, Dilara, in a special topic, what do you say?

140.       slavica
814 posts
 21 Feb 2007 Wed 07:35 am

Quoting aenigma x:

Haha! We will have to agree to disagree, Slavica. I believe reading is a habit which needs to be acquired and the more you read, the more likely you are to gravitate to the classics.



Quoting reBooped:


You and I shall have to agree to differ on this - reading is essential for all and is not just about quality of literature. For a non-reader the classics could seem very 'heavy' going and would put off many - whereas starting to read anything hopefully will develop a reading habit. Once someone starts to read for enjoyment, I believe that in time they will expand the kinds of books read - and probably 'progress'onto the classics.



Come on, girls! I don’t insist on classics at all and I have absolutely nothing against reading for enjoyment. There are many valuable works among non-classic literature. But if you still insist that it is better to read ANYTHING than nothing – then I agree to disagree What’s wrong in having different oppinions?

Quoting aenigma x:


Personally, I would rather see a child reading an 'unworthy' book than playing a computer game...



Haha... absolutely agree! Except if the book is „How to kill your parents and live happily“

141.       aenigma x
0 posts
 21 Feb 2007 Wed 10:14 am

Quoting slavica:

What’s wrong in having different oppinions?



I totally agree - thats why I said "we should agree to disagree"

142.       reBooped
0 posts
 21 Feb 2007 Wed 02:58 pm

Quoting slavica:

Quoting aenigma x:



Quoting reBooped:


.



Come on, girls! I don’t insist on classics at all and I have absolutely nothing against reading for enjoyment. There are many valuable works among non-classic literature. But if you still insist that it is better to read ANYTHING than nothing – then I agree to disagree What’s wrong in having different oppinions?


That was my point, there is aboslutely nothing wrong with having differing opinions ~ that is where we agree

143.       sophie
2712 posts
 21 Feb 2007 Wed 03:28 pm

Quoting duda:


P.S. Elisa, suppose you recommend "The Parfume"? I saw it (translated! alas!) here and from the very start I have a feeling it's something worth reading. Can you compare it to something? I would like to hear somebody's personal impressions, for I don't like to read "noncertified" books.



I adored the book when I first read it 10 years ago. You can't compare it to any other book. At least I can't. So Duda, go get it. Im sure you won't regret it.
BUT!!! DO NOT watch the movie afterwards! Trust me, I know what Im saying :-S

144.       juliacernat
424 posts
 21 Feb 2007 Wed 04:41 pm

The Perfume by Patrick Suskind- a book definitely worth reading....

Can you imagine a world entirely made of perfumes, smells, fragrances? Can you imagine a man who knows life ony by smelling it? do you know each person has an unique smell, a smell than can make him/her anonimous or irresistible?
Once upon a time there was a man who discovered an evanescent perfume that he wanted to control: the perfume of young woman.....

Enjoy

145.       slavica
814 posts
 22 Feb 2007 Thu 12:17 am

Quoting aenigma x:


Slavica!!

I am surprised at you!



Actually, I’m (nicely) surprised that some members, who generally don’t leave any topic without their comment, didn’t take part in this discussion

146.       Dilara
1153 posts
 22 Feb 2007 Thu 06:06 am

Quoting slavica:

Quoting Dilara:

what other latin poets do you know or like?



Gabriela Mistral, Borges, Octavio Paz... but I’m sure there are more valuable, but not very well known Latin American authors. Maybe you could introduce us to their works, Dilara, in a special topic, what do you say?



It's great you know Gabriela Mistral! I would also recommend you Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer , Juana de Ibarbourou (Uruguayan, romantic poetry) and Vicente Huidobro(Chilean)
Cheers!

147.       gezbelle
1542 posts
 22 Feb 2007 Thu 08:26 am

Mine are:
1. Lord of the Rings - J.R.R. Tolkien
2. Memoirs of a Geisha - Arthur Golden
3. Wild Swans - Jung Chang
4. Middlesex - Jeffrey Eugenides
5. Le Petit Prince - Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
6. Djiin - Alain Robbe-Grillet
7. The Alchemist - Paulo Coelho
8. The Power of One - Bryce Courtenay
9. Die Verwandlung (The Metamorphosis) - Kafka
10. Furcht und Elend des Dritten Reiches (Fear and Misery of the Third Reich) - Bertolt Brecht
11. Not without my Daughter - Betty Mahmoody
12. To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
13. The Da Vinci Code - Dan Brown
14. Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck
15. War and Peace - Tolstoy

Honourable Mention: Interview with the Vampire - Anne Rice (I couldn't fit it onto the list)

148.       nautilis
0 posts
 22 Feb 2007 Thu 09:20 am

149.       ramayan
2633 posts
 22 Feb 2007 Thu 12:03 pm

Quoting nautilis:

küçük prens,QUOTE]

i luv that book..i adoe it though its a childen book...its so philosophical and so touching

thanks fr mentioning it

150.       aenigma x
0 posts
 22 Feb 2007 Thu 12:11 pm

Quoting slavica:

Quoting aenigma x:


Slavica!!

I am surprised at you!



Actually, I’m (nicely) surprised that some members, who generally don’t leave any topic without their comment, didn’t take part in this discussion



Don't tempt fate!

151.       duda
0 posts
 22 Feb 2007 Thu 12:31 pm

Rereading this topic, I find myself surprised by something else: no Italian writers (except Elsa Morante, but it was me who mentioned her), no Polish, no Czech and Slovakian writers (may I add Karel Czapek as one of the best East-European writers?), no Nordian or Dane writers, etc, and the biggest gap - very small percent of Russian (or Ex-Russian) writers) - and the Russian literature is world for itself - not world but cosmos!

It seems the literature has become susceptible to fashions and interests of publishers & booksellers, turning itself to an industry of entertainment. And as long as the people are reading Lesley Pearses and James Patersons... the good literature stays forgotten.

152.       Elisa
0 posts
 25 Feb 2007 Sun 07:37 pm

Quoting Elisa:

to be continued probably..



I'd like to add Jonathan Safran Foer's Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close to my list

153.       bod
5999 posts
 27 Feb 2007 Tue 06:36 pm

I don't think I have read 15 fictional books in my entire life......in fact I know I haven't!!! I generally only read text books

154.       aenigma x
0 posts
 27 Feb 2007 Tue 06:38 pm

Quoting bod:

I don't think I have read 15 fictional books in my entire life......in fact I know I haven't!!! I generally only read text books



That would suggest a lack of imagination - which I KNOW to be untrue !

155.       bod
5999 posts
 27 Feb 2007 Tue 07:10 pm

Quoting aenigma x:

Quoting bod:

I don't think I have read 15 fictional books in my entire life......in fact I know I haven't!!! I generally only read text books



That would suggest a lack of imagination - which I KNOW to be untrue !



But I have never been one to follow what is suggested
I am the oxymoronical archetypal recalcitrant individual lol

156.       SuiGeneris
3922 posts
 27 Feb 2007 Tue 07:19 pm

Quoting bod:

Quoting aenigma x:

Quoting bod:

I don't think I have read 15 fictional books in my entire life......in fact I know I haven't!!! I generally only read text books



That would suggest a lack of imagination - which I KNOW to be untrue !



But I have never been one to follow what is suggested
I am the oxymoronical archetypal recalcitrant individual lol



does this mean that you are clinical too?

157.       bod
5999 posts
 27 Feb 2007 Tue 07:26 pm

Quoting SuiGeneris:

Quoting bod:

I am the oxymoronical archetypal recalcitrant individual lol



does this mean that you are clinical too?



There's your English test Sui.....

158.       SuiGeneris
3922 posts
 27 Feb 2007 Tue 07:29 pm

Quoting bod:

Quoting SuiGeneris:

Quoting bod:

I am the oxymoronical archetypal recalcitrant individual lol



does this mean that you are clinical too?



There's your English test Sui.....


but you got what i meant

159.       bod
5999 posts
 27 Feb 2007 Tue 07:38 pm

Quoting SuiGeneris:

Quoting bod:

Quoting SuiGeneris:

Quoting bod:

I am the oxymoronical archetypal recalcitrant individual lol



does this mean that you are clinical too?



There's your English test Sui.....


but you got what i meant



Evet!
But did you get what I meant

160.       SuiGeneris
3922 posts
 27 Feb 2007 Tue 07:41 pm

Quoting bod:

Quoting SuiGeneris:

Quoting bod:

Quoting SuiGeneris:

Quoting bod:

I am the oxymoronical archetypal recalcitrant individual lol



does this mean that you are clinical too?



There's your English test Sui.....


but you got what i meant



Evet!
But did you get what I meant



thats why i called 911 after looking at dictionary
dont worry i told nurses that you are harmless
they will be polite

161.       bod
5999 posts
 27 Feb 2007 Tue 07:44 pm

Quoting SuiGeneris:

thats why i called 911 after looking at dictionary
dont worry i told nurses that you are harmless
they will be polite



lol ** GiGGLe ** lol

162.       portokal
2516 posts
 29 Sep 2007 Sat 06:18 pm

Heinrich Boll - The Clown
Michel Tournier - Friday
Herman Hesse - The Glass Bead Game
Jonathan Swift - Gulliver's Travels
Mario Vargas Llosa - The Storyteller
Lucius Apuleius Platonicus - The Golden Ass (Apuleius Asinus )
Gustave Flaubert - Madame Bovary
Victor Hugo - The Man Who Laughs
Milán Füst - The Story of My Wife
John Fowles - The Magician
Umberto Eco - The Foucalt Pendulum
George Orwell - 1984
Henri Stendhal - On Love (essay, not novel )
Martin Buber - Gog and Magog - A Chronicle
Gabriel Garcia Marquez - 100 Years of Solitude

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