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What is this Language? (I See It All the Time)
(16 Messages in 2 pages - View all)
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10.       si++
3785 posts
 29 Nov 2011 Tue 01:03 pm

 

Quoting Abla

The Cyrillic ortography is a very clever one and I think it is no problem to use it for Turkish also. I noticed is Kyrgyz language only three extra marks were taken into use (for ı, ü and

ŋ if I remember now). But I really wonder the using of Arabic writing. In my opinion they shouldn´t use it for Arabic even, but the rich variety of vowels in Turkic languages must be a real problem if you use Arabic scrift. I will have to see how it looks...

 

Can you be more specific? In which ways is it clever?

 

Personally I believe Latin script is well suited to Turkic languages.

 

Again personally I find it hard to decode cyrillic script (I can but I need to spend too much time decoding the words letter by letter) and too confusing (H for N, P for R and C for S for example is a problem for me).

11.       Abla
3647 posts
 29 Nov 2011 Tue 01:13 pm

Each letter stands for one phoneme only. You just learn the code, get used to it and that´s it. The only problem in reading Russian is the word stress which can be on any syllable. In addition, the vowels of those syllables which are non-stressed change their quality. But as there are no such problems in Turkish (the stress rules are not very complicated and the stressed syllable doesn´t kill the rest of the syllables) Russian alphabet would work just fine for you, too...

Different ortographies are a real problem and they create obstacles between peoples. They are not only a technical challenge but some kind of a mental barrier also. (As you see, clever people like you find it hard to accept that C stands for S even though it is just an agreement. What about those who hardly master their own mother tongue?) Because of the orthography Arabic looks much harder in our eyes than it actually is. Maybe the same applies to Chinese or Japanese also.



Edited (11/29/2011) by Abla

12.       si++
3785 posts
 29 Nov 2011 Tue 01:27 pm

 

Quoting Abla

Each letter stands for one phoneme only. You just learn the code, get used to it and that´s it. The only problem in reading Russian is the word stress which can be on any syllable. In addition, the vowels of those syllables which are non-stressed change their quality. But as there are no such problems in Turkish (the stress rules are not very complicated and the stressed syllable doesn´t kill the rest of the syllables) Russian alphabet would work just fine for you, too...

 

But they use 2 symbols for "I/ı". I believe our Latin based alphabet has been designed more cleverly than Cryllic. It´s actually our alphabet that has one letter for each phonem.

 

Just look at the logic used for back and front wovels

aıou vs eiöü (dotless vs dotted)

 

As a result of that logic, we have created the letter "I/ı" for example, which I belive is something clever in our alphabet.

 

They even considered dotted a (can´t type on my kb) for "e" to make it consistent (which they later gave up).

13.       Abla
3647 posts
 29 Nov 2011 Tue 01:39 pm

I modified the last message at the same minute you posted, did you notice?

There are both i and ı in Russian. And a lot of assimilations take place in words like in every language but as long as they don´t change the meaning the orthography works.

Just keep your writing system. I was just teasing.

14.       si++
3785 posts
 29 Nov 2011 Tue 01:52 pm

 

Quoting Abla

I modified the last message at the same minute you posted, did you notice?

There are both i and ı in Russian. And a lot of assimilations take place in words like in every language but as long as they don´t change the meaning the orthography works.

Just keep your writing system. I was just teasing.

 

OK. But;

siz = Вы (vı the Russion "ı" looks like 2 letters to my eyes

B for V is also confusing for me. OK it´s only an agreement but not something I am used to.

15.       Abla
3647 posts
 29 Nov 2011 Tue 04:15 pm

Now I see. It didn´t occur to my mind someone could see ы as two letters. It´s only your negative attitude, si++. Cyrillic is a good orthography at least compared with the crooked language it represents.



Edited (11/29/2011) by Abla

16.       si++
3785 posts
 29 Nov 2011 Tue 05:39 pm

 

Quoting Abla

Now I see. It didn´t occur to my mind someone could see ы as two letters. It´s only your negative attitude, si++. Cyrillic is a good orthography at least compared with the crooky language it represents.  

 

Doesn´t it look like "bl"? I typed two letters for "bl" on my keyboard (it can be typed as one on the Russian keyboard).

 

Yes maybe it´s me and my negative attitude. But it looks strange to me. Latin script is better. And Latin script has been adapted to Turkish very effectively.

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