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A GOOD TEST OF INTEGRITY
(69 Messages in 7 pages - View all)
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40.       kafesteki kus
0 posts
 22 Dec 2007 Sat 01:17 am

Quoting portokal:

Quoting portokal:

Quoting alameda:


Am I missing something here? Could you please clarify?


actually, this cemetery goes just as unnoticed as it would have in this thread, except for your question ))). but just as unnoticed in a turkish forum ))))) a mere remark. )))



now, how this connect to the topic of integrity? just through me. then:

1. most of the times i seriously question my integrity.

2. the original topic was missing a few lines from the article. Ecce:
A long time ago, there was an old man with his children living in a mountain village. They lived a very happy life, with only one big problem. They had to climb over a big mountain to go to the field everyday. So one day the old man decided to move the mountain. With his children, they began chipping away pieces of rock every day at the foot of the mountain. A wise man passed by and said, 'How can you possibly think you can move the mountain?' The old man said, 'Probably I won't. But you see, I have children. My children will have children. And they will continue and the mountain will be moved.


good one ,Porto,Thanx
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DY3ZEvOfD1w&feature=related

41.       portokal
2516 posts
 22 Dec 2007 Sat 01:21 am

Quoting kafesteki kus:

Thanx

42.       portokal
2516 posts
 22 Dec 2007 Sat 01:22 am

amazing grace

43.       alameda
3499 posts
 22 Dec 2007 Sat 01:35 am

Quoting portokal:

Quoting alameda:


Am I missing something here? Could you please clarify?


actually, this cemetery goes just as unnoticed as it would have in this thread, except for your question ))). but just as unnoticed in a turkish forum ))))) a mere remark. )))



Quite beautiful, nice...

A wise man I once knew said we are walking on our ancestors. In (New York City where I spent most of my life) there are many graveyards that have been turned into baseball fields, parks or had large building built on top of them.

Washington Square Park in the Village was a drilling field in the early days of the US development. They used to do executions there. The hanging trees are still there.

It then became a potters field. During yellow fever and malaria epidemics thousands were buried there.

In the early 19th Century they decided to make it a park. Another time they decided to build a fountain there. They dug up a lot of old caskets still with the yellow blankets on them. I know because I spoke with some of the workmen who did the excavation.

Then there is the now famous African Burial Ground in Wall St. I walked by that numerous times before it was discovered.

Then there is a swimming pool, baseball diamond and boce ball court that was built on a private cemetary that had been abandoned. It became a sunken garden, then was made what it is now. I know about that, because I knew an older man who was there when they were digging up the graves. He said they used to just leave the bones around, and being a kid, used to take bones home to his mother..."look Ma what I found!"

Just think, how many graves do we walk over now and don't even realize it.

I could go on, but for now will leave it at this. It is a sobering realization. Dust to dust, ashes to ashes. What remains are our works.

Respect and gratitude are in order for all.

44.       turkodelight
1 posts
 22 Dec 2007 Sat 01:40 am

Quoting AlphaF:

Turgut Ozal was Kurdish, he eventually became the President.



Actually Turgut Ozal was a president with his turkish idendity. None of kurdish became president in turkey as their kurdish identity. he could become a president as he accepted being turkish idendity. nobody can say he was not kurdish ethnically, but his identity was turkish, there is a huge difference between these two situation.

45.       catwoman
8933 posts
 22 Dec 2007 Sat 03:40 am

Quoting turkodelight:

Quoting AlphaF:

Turgut Ozal was Kurdish, he eventually became the President.



Actually Turgut Ozal was a president with his turkish idendity. None of kurdish became president in turkey as their kurdish identity. he could become a president as he accepted being turkish idendity. nobody can say he was not kurdish ethnically, but his identity was turkish, there is a huge difference between these two situation.


It must be an issue of the well known here betaF's lack of integrity problem.

46.       teaschip
3870 posts
 22 Dec 2007 Sat 04:54 am

Quoting AlphaF:

Quoting teaschip1:

What's your point, so there hasn't been a woman president either. Just for your information..

1987 President Ronald Reagan appoints Dr. Joy Cherian, the 1st Indian Commissioner of the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commmision (EEOC).

2007 Bobby Jindal is elected governor of Louisiana and is the 1st person of Indian descent to be elected governor of an American state. He is presently and historically the highest ranking Indian American in the United States Government.

Shall I go on...



You should be ashamed to admit that first elected native governor had to wait until 2007.

I demand that my brothers' holy lands be returned immediately..with three large herds of buffalos, if you dont mind !

You can go back to Germany or Ireland....whatever..



I'm not ashamed to admit anything, only giving you the facts. I wish there were more educated and qualified Indians to hold govermental positions, rather than running casinos.

Maybe the government should do more for them, however it takes accountability of ones personal dedication to become educated and career driven. Everyone seems to blame everyone for their own destination. Where is the accountability for ones success.. It starts with motivation and determination to want to be successful.

Our government has given them land to live on, the right to vote and every opportunity to take advantage of our education system to become successful. If they want to keep revisiting the past instead of looking to the future, maybe that's what keeps holding them back.

As far as going to Germany and Ireland, I would love to visit. But my homeland is the U.S. and will always be. But thanks for the approval..

As far as your brothers, they are my ancestors as well. My Great Grandma was part Cherokee. So now you can call me a traitor....

47.       catwoman
8933 posts
 22 Dec 2007 Sat 05:08 am

Quoting teaschip1:

I wish there were more educated and qualified Indians to hold govermental positions, rather than running casinos.

Maybe the government should do more for them, however it takes accountability of ones personal dedication to become educated and career driven. Everyone seems to blame everyone for their own destination. Where is the accountability for ones success.. It starts with motivation and determination to want to be successful.


+10000000000

48.       teaschip
3870 posts
 22 Dec 2007 Sat 05:46 am

I read this article, which to me sheds some light and raises some very good questions on the subject.
by Ric James

Please note that the Constitution lists both itself and the laws made “in Pursuance thereof” in the same sentence and, I might add, it lists them first. Without the Constitution, the treaties aren’t accorded the position of being part of the “supreme Law of the Land”, so the implication that treaties are somehow to be considered above all else is incorrect.

I would like to say, however, that I do not argue against the point that people are within their rights to be free and, should they choose, independent of the United States. I do not recognize their rights to be independent of the United States inside the borders of the United States. Nor do I absolve them of the consequences of such a declaration, as our founding fathers were not immune to the consequences of the Declaration of Independence. I would also point out that there are ways that this unilateral withdrawal from treaties with us can turn out that aren’t near so romantically positive as some might think.

The issues with having a foreign country as an overlay onto US soil are far more involved than simply issuing passports and printing up new letterhead. While I realize that the Tribes have their own police force and that tribal laws apply within the boundaries of the existing reservations, this situation goes far beyond that. For starters, the Lakota are rescinding the very treaties that set those reservations up to begin with. Since those treaties are now dissolved, there is no legal basis for the tribal justice system to claim jurisdiction over a given area. Now what? If the Lakota decide to enact some kind of law that is in direct violation of the US Constitution - let’s say they decide to dispense with their law enforcement’s need for a search warrant - what law prevails when a US citizen gets stopped by a Lakota police officer? What happens when that US Citizen makes a run for it? Are they on US soil or Lakota? And what ultimate authority makes that call? The US Supreme Court no longer has jurisdiction over Lakota police without those treaties.

And what about the offer to US Citizens to switch to Lakota nationality? If they’re living on what is now US soil, do the Lakota believe their switch will annex the property? Do those people who accept have to move? What about people who are living in the area claimed who choose not to switch citizenship? Do the Lakota suggest that those people have to move out?

And where, exactly, are the Lakota drawing their map lines, anyway? According to the BIA map of Indian Reservations, there is no reservation that stretches between the states listed in the Lakota’s announcement. And if they’re simply declaring that the 5-state area in question is to be turned over to them, what are they suggesting they’re going to do with the people currently living in those states under US citizenship and what are they implying if we say we’re not turning that land over?

Something else to bear in mind - those treaties have also kept the US from bringing military action against the tribes.

I am interested to see how this will play out but the advocates of the “noble savage” rendition of history should understand that the US isn’t going to gather up all Americans of European descent and cram them into the area of the original 13 colonies. Anyone holding that hope out needs to get a grip.

49.       AlphaF
5677 posts
 22 Dec 2007 Sat 07:46 am

Quoting catwoman:

Quoting teaschip1:

I wish there were more educated and qualified Indians to hold govermental positions, rather than running casinos.

Maybe the government should do more for them, however it takes accountability of ones personal dedication to become educated and career driven. Everyone seems to blame everyone for their own destination. Where is the accountability for ones success.. It starts with motivation and determination to want to be successful.


+10000000000



How true...We have similar problems here. All Cherokees have probably learned, at least, English language by now: We have not even gone that far yet...We are a much younger Republic and we are definitely working on it....

What a faceless double standard !

50.       AlphaF
5677 posts
 22 Dec 2007 Sat 07:56 am

Quoting turkodelight:

Quoting AlphaF:

Turgut Ozal was Kurdish, he eventually became the President.



Actually Turgut Ozal was a president with his turkish idendity. None of kurdish became president in turkey as their kurdish identity. he could become a president as he accepted being turkish idendity. nobody can say he was not kurdish ethnically, but his identity was turkish, there is a huge difference between these two situation.



Politics, on the basis of ethnical, racial, color, religious differences, is against Turkish Constitution. The State, within democracy, has every right to stop anyone who wants to become its President on such basis. Toppling a State, using the rights and priviledges offered by that State has been tried before. It generally backfires.

Despite considerable people of Irish origin in the States you can not become the US president with any Irish identity. Same in Turkia: no other identity but a Turkish one will get you that seat. The fact that Ozal did get the seat is proof that the concept of "Turkish identity" here is not used in ethnical sense.

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