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Imperative rule
(36 Messages in 4 pages - View all)
1 2 3 4
1.       alanood
9 posts
 16 Feb 2007 Fri 05:27 pm

Hiii, can someone tell me if i want to say don't go , what it will be ??
Thanks

2.       natiypuspi
435 posts
 16 Feb 2007 Fri 05:38 pm

Gitme (singular)

Gitmeyiniz (plural)

3.       alanood
9 posts
 16 Feb 2007 Fri 05:56 pm

gitme in the dictionary mean going , how can i distinguish between (going ) or imperative gitme ?
and for plurarl imperative of git is gitin so with negative i guess gitmeyin

4.       natiypuspi
435 posts
 16 Feb 2007 Fri 06:05 pm

Quoting alanood:

gitme in the dictionary mean going , how can i distinguish between (going ) or imperative gitme ?
and for plurarl imperative of git is gitin so with negative i guess gitmeyin



Yes, you're right: gitme means "dont go" and it's also "the going" (a verbal noun). You can distinguish them only from context.

About "gitsin", it means "that he/it goes". It's the imperative positive for 3rd person singular.
"Gittin" means "you went".

5.       juliacernat
424 posts
 16 Feb 2007 Fri 06:06 pm

first, you cannot find in the dictionary such forms of the verbs; tenses and verbal forms are not there, you just have to learn the mechanism of their forming

the negative imperative

"almak"- ALMA for the 2nd person singular and ALMAYIN or ALMAYINIZ for the 2nd person plural

"gitmek"- GITME for the 2nd person singular and GITMEYIN or GITMEYINIZ for the 2nd person plural

ben gitmeyeyim
sen gitme
o gitsin
biz gitmeyelim
siz gitmeyin/ gitmeyiniz
onlar gitmesinler

6.       natiypuspi
435 posts
 16 Feb 2007 Fri 06:38 pm

"Gitmeyin" is a polite form of saying don't go, and it is used as a a public imperative.

7.       Müjde
posts
 16 Feb 2007 Fri 07:49 pm

Merhaba,
Sorunu aşağıdaki örneklerle açıklamaya çalıştım:

Çocuk:Anne,ben parka GİTMEK istiyorum.
Anne:Gitme.
Çocuk:Neden?
Anne:Ödevin bitmedi daha.

As you know, in English dictionaries, verb are shown as "to go",but we don't use them with "to" unless we need an infinitive or gerung(going) verb in a sentence.(I mean we can't use two verbs together in one sentence without infinitive or gerund)
Now it is same for Turkish.In dictinaries,even they use "gitme or gitmek", we dont use them with "-mek".
But in the first sentence THERE ARE TWO VERBS.SO "gitme"is in THE INFINITIVE FORM.But in second sentence it is negative imperative because she refuses her child's wish and there are no other verbs.
Here are more examples for positive imperatives and different subjects
Ayşe(child): Pencere açacağım.
Anne(mother): AÇ.=(imperative for you-singular)
(more polite=açabilirsin=you can open)

* * *
Anne:Kardeşini ara,eve GELSİN.(for 3rd singular person)
Ayşe: Peki.
Anne :Limonata yaptım.Arkadaşları da GELSİN.(For 3rd-plural person)
Hepbirlikte İÇİN.(İÇ+İN =FOR 2nd plural person)

Umarım bu örnekler sana yardımcı olur

8.       AllTooHuman
0 posts
 16 Feb 2007 Fri 08:18 pm

A tiny correction:

English verbs are shown in the dictionaries as bare infinitive, not to-infinitive. So you see "go" instead of "to go".

9.       natiypuspi
435 posts
 16 Feb 2007 Fri 08:21 pm

Quoting Müjde:

Merhaba,
Sorunu aşağıdaki örneklerle açıklamaya çalıştım:

Çocuk:Anne,ben parka GİTMEK istiyorum.
Anne:Gitme.
Çocuk:Neden?
Anne:Ödevin bitmedi daha.




Boy: Mom, I want to go to the park.
Mother: Don't go.


When you want to say "I WANT to do something" in turkish, you have to use the verb in infinitive. EX:
I want to sleep = Uyumak istiyorum.

It's an exception.
But if you want to say, for example "I like sleeping", yo have to use the verbal noun, uyuma (the sleeping).
I like sleeping = Uyumayı beğeniyorum

The verbal noun ıs the actıon of the verbç
Infinitive: gitmek
Verbal noun: gitme (the going) gitmeme (the not going)


How to say "want to": http://www.turkishclass.com/grammar_must_have_to.htm

10.       Müjde
posts
 16 Feb 2007 Fri 08:48 pm

Hi!
When you look at an English-Turkish dictionary you see infinitive form of verb, Alltohuman!
I've checked it in my English-Turkish Oxford Dictionary: "GO=GİTMEK" is written.

11.       Müjde
posts
 16 Feb 2007 Fri 08:52 pm

And this somethimes is same for some Turkish -English dictionaries.
But thanks for your correction.

12.       AllTooHuman
0 posts
 16 Feb 2007 Fri 08:54 pm

Quoting Müjde:

Hi!
When you look at an English-Turkish dictionary you see infinitive form of verb, Alltohuman!
I've checked it in my English-Turkish Oxford Dictionary: "GO=GİTMEK" is written.



Oh, sorry then! I supposed you were referring to the forms of english verbs. On the turkish ones you are right.

13.       aenigma x
0 posts
 16 Feb 2007 Fri 09:50 pm

Quoting AllTooHuman:

Quoting Müjde:

Hi!
When you look at an English-Turkish dictionary you see infinitive form of verb, Alltohuman!
I've checked it in my English-Turkish Oxford Dictionary: "GO=GİTMEK" is written.



Oh, sorry then! I supposed you were referring to the forms of english verbs. On the turkish ones you are right.



I guess its all too human to make mistakes

14.       AllTooHuman
0 posts
 16 Feb 2007 Fri 11:17 pm

Quoting aenigma x:


I guess its all too human to make mistakes



lol creative!... impressing!.. nothing more to say!

15.       metehan2001
501 posts
 17 Feb 2007 Sat 12:57 am

Quoting juliacernat:

first, you cannot find in the dictionary such forms of the verbs; tenses and verbal forms are not there, you just have to learn the mechanism of their forming

the negative imperative

"almak"- ALMA for the 2nd person singular and ALMAYIN or ALMAYINIZ for the 2nd person plural

"gitmek"- GITME for the 2nd person singular and GITMEYIN or GITMEYINIZ for the 2nd person plural

ben gitmeyeyim
sen gitme
o gitsin
biz gitmeyelim
siz gitmeyin/ gitmeyiniz
onlar gitmesinler


Juliacarnat, I am afraid you made a wrong conjugation above. Your mistake was mixing two forms (Optative form and Imperative form). I will conjugate the verb (git-) again so that you can see the difference.

1. OPTATIVE FORM

POSITIVE-NEGATIVE
gideyim-gitmeyeyim
gidesin-gitmeyesin (not used in modern Turkish)
gide-gitmeye (not used in modern Turkish)
gidelim-gitmeyelim
gidesiniz-gitmeyesiniz (not used in modern Turkish)
gideler-gitmeyeler (not used in modern Turkish)

2. IMPERATIVE FORM

POSITIVE-NEGATIVE
(no form for 1 person singular)
git-gitme
gitsin-gitmesin
(no form for 1 person plural)
gidin(iz)-gitmeyin(iz)
gitsin(ler)-gitmesin(ler)

16.       juliacernat
424 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 12:29 am

I have learnt them like this:
Emir kipi:
positive negative
alayim almayayim
al alma
alsin almasin
alalim almayalim
alin/aliniz almayin/almayiniz
alsinlar almasinlar

Istek kipi:
positive negative
sorayim sormayayim
sorasin sormayasin
sorsun sormasin
soralim sormayalim
sorasiniz sormayasiniz
sorsunlar sormasinlar

17.       metehan2001
501 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 03:26 am

Dear juliacarnat,
I am sorry to say that but your information about Imperative and Optative forms are wrong. I wrote the true information in my previous post. If you can check the 'Learn Turkish' page (for Imperative form) in our website, you will see correct conjugation.

18.       Dilara
1153 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 05:02 am

Quoting metehan2001:

Quoting juliacernat:

first, you cannot find in the dictionary such forms of the verbs; tenses and verbal forms are not there, you just have to learn the mechanism of their forming

the negative imperative

"almak"- ALMA for the 2nd person singular and ALMAYIN or ALMAYINIZ for the 2nd person plural

"gitmek"- GITME for the 2nd person singular and GITMEYIN or GITMEYINIZ for the 2nd person plural

ben gitmeyeyim
sen gitme
o gitsin
biz gitmeyelim
siz gitmeyin/ gitmeyiniz
onlar gitmesinler


Juliacarnat, I am afraid you made a wrong conjugation above. Your mistake was mixing two forms (Optative form and Imperative form). I will conjugate the verb (git-) again so that you can see the difference.

1. OPTATIVE FORM

POSITIVE-NEGATIVE
gideyim-gitmeyeyim
gidesin-gitmeyesin (not used in modern Turkish)
gide-gitmeye (not used in modern Turkish)
gidelim-gitmeyelim
gidesiniz-gitmeyesiniz (not used in modern Turkish)
gideler-gitmeyeler (not used in modern Turkish)

2. IMPERATIVE FORM

POSITIVE-NEGATIVE
(no form for 1 person singular)
git-gitme
gitsin-gitmesin
(no form for 1 person plural)
gidin(iz)-gitmeyin(iz)
gitsin(ler)-gitmesin(ler)



Thank you for the information you provided.
Imperatives always confuse me.
Dilara

19.       alanood
9 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:28 am

hi every body and thanks for your contributuon i appreciate it

20.       juliacernat
424 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 01:20 pm

Quoting metehan2001:


Juliacarnat, I am afraid you made a wrong conjugation above. Your mistake was mixing two forms (Optative form and Imperative form). I will conjugate the verb (git-) again so that you can see the difference.

1. OPTATIVE FORM

POSITIVE-NEGATIVE
gideyim-gitmeyeyim
gidesin-gitmeyesin (not used in modern Turkish)
gide-gitmeye (not used in modern Turkish)
gidelim-gitmeyelim
gidesiniz-gitmeyesiniz (not used in modern Turkish)
gideler-gitmeyeler (not used in modern Turkish)

2. IMPERATIVE FORM

POSITIVE-NEGATIVE
(no form for 1 person singular)
git-gitme
gitsin-gitmesin
(no form for 1 person plural)
gidin(iz)-gitmeyin(iz)
gitsin(ler)-gitmesin(ler)



Thank you for the corrections; I've written them down in my notebook, too

....and it is juliacErnat, or ... just julia ...

thanks again

21.       caliptrix
3055 posts
 18 Feb 2007 Sun 08:12 pm

Quoting natiypuspi:


I like sleeping = Uyumayı beğeniyorum



I think beğenmek is not suitable for here. It must be "Uyumayı seviyorum".

22.       juliacernat
424 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 12:09 am

Quoting caliptrix:

Quoting natiypuspi:


I like sleeping = Uyumayı beğeniyorum



I think beğenmek is not suitable for here. It must be "Uyumayı seviyorum".



as this mention has been made, it would be useful to distinguish between the use of "sevmek", "beğenmek" and "hoşlanmak"; thus, besides the diffenent cases asked by these verbs (-i for "sevmek" and "beğenmek" and -dan for "hoşlanmak"), which is the proper context use for each of them?

thank you,
julia

23.       red_dg
138 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 12:29 am

I want to ask you guys something about this imperative verbs. I know this;

come here = Buraya gel

so how could you say

Buraya geleyim
Buraya gelsin
Buraya gelelim
Buraya gelin
Buraya gelsinler

in english? =) thx for your helpp!!

24.       AllTooHuman
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 12:34 am

Quoting red_dg:

I want to ask you guys something about this imperative verbs. I know this;

come here = Buraya gel

so how could you say

Buraya geleyim
Buraya gelsin
Buraya gelelim
Buraya gelin
Buraya gelsinler

in english? =) thx for your helpp!!



I will give it a go: (corrections are welcome)

Let me come here or I (should) come here
Let him/her/it come here or He/she/It (should) come here
Let us come here or We (should) come here
Come here or you (should) come here
Let them come here or they (should) come here

25.       natiypuspi
435 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 01:39 am

Quoting caliptrix:

Quoting natiypuspi:


I like sleeping = Uyumayı beğeniyorum



I think beğenmek is not suitable for here. It must be "Uyumayı seviyorum".



Thanks Caliptrix for the correction. So when can I use beğenmek and when sevmek?

26.       Dilara
1153 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 02:38 am

I have the same question as you natiypuspi ! I thought they were interchangeable but it seems I was wrong.

27.       caliptrix
3055 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:17 am

Quoting natiypuspi:

Quoting caliptrix:

Quoting natiypuspi:


I like sleeping = Uyumayı beğeniyorum



I think beğenmek is not suitable for here. It must be "Uyumayı seviyorum".



Thanks Caliptrix for the correction. So when can I use beğenmek and when sevmek?



Unfortunately, I don't have an idea exactly.


if you say [noun] + seviyorum (present continuous), it means generally the special love: I love:
Ahmet'i seviyorum: I love Ahmet
Seni seviyorum: I love you
as an exception: if the nouns is plural or a member of a family, it doesnt mean special person:
Sizi seviyorum: I love you(you all)
Kardeşimi seviyorum: I love my brother/sister

if you say [noun]+ severim: it is the person you love generally.
Ahmet'i severim: I like Ahmet
Kardeşimi severim: I love my brother/sister

if you say [activity] + seviyorum/severim, it means like a hoby love:
yemek yapmayı severim: I like cooking
uyumayı severim: I like sleeping
yağmuru izlemeyi severim: I like watching the rain
televizyon izlemeyi seviyorum: I like watching TV

beğenmek is for something about another person:
Ahmet'i beğeniyorum << a bit weird usage of I like Ahmet as special person
but if there is an activity:
Ahmet'in bu davranışını beğeniyorum << it is the behaviour of Ahmet.
or it can be a meal you like:
bu yemeği beğeniyorum << But a bit weird again.

hoşlanmak is also used for a special person:
Ayşe'den hoşlanıyorum

or an activity you like:
kitap okumaktan hoşlanıyorum (can be interchangible to "-i seviyorum")

Sorry I cannot explain well. I hope there is someone who can write exactly.

28.       metehan2001
501 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:17 am


I see that most of the Turkish learners make a mistake which is mixing two forms together(Optative form and Imperative form). I will conjugate the verb (git-) again so that you can see the difference.

1. OPTATIVE FORM

POSITIVE-NEGATIVE
gideyim/let me go
gidesin (not used in modern Turkish)
gide/let him/her go(not used in modern Turkish)
gidelim/let's go
gidesiniz (not used in modern Turkish)
gideler/let them go (not used in modern Turkish)

2. IMPERATIVE FORM

POSITIVE-NEGATIVE
(no form for first person singular)
git/go
gitsin/tell him to go
(no form for first person plural)
gidin(iz)/go
gitsin(ler)/tell them to go

29.       natiypuspi
435 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 03:39 am

Thanks Caliptrix. I understood it now.

30.       natiypuspi
435 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 05:12 am

Quoting AllTooHuman:



this is the first time I have seen 'gitsin' was translated as 'tell him to go', which is only a possible meaning but not equivalent of 'gitsin'.



Please look, here also says 'tell him to go' when translates 'gitsin'.

http://learningpracticalturkish.com/turkish-verb-imperative.html

31.       gezbelle
1542 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 05:22 am

i think "gitsin" can be translated as either "tell him to go" or "let him go"

http://www.turkishlanguage.co.uk/imperative.htm

32.       AllTooHuman
0 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 05:12 pm

Quoting natiypuspi:

Please look, here also says 'tell him to go' when translates 'gitsin'.



Quoting gezbelle:

i think "gitsin" can be translated as either "tell him to go" or "let him go"

http://www.turkishlanguage.co.uk/imperative.htm



Thank you, natispuyi and gezbelle, for the links you gave as reference. Writing my above post, it was rather late and I hadn't much time to find more proper expressions then. Perhaps it would had been so much better if I had used indicate or display instead of translate. But pPlease pay attention my remark, I already wrote tell him to go is a possible translation of gitsin. I tried to refer to something else. Well... since we here are in the field of grammar, I think it is much more proper to indicate grammatical patterns rather than explanations. And I think tell him to go is an explanation of gitsin. (that's why it is a translation of gitsin, but not a grammatical correspondence, for English already has let. With reference to imperative, I can always mention the construction let + objective pronoun + bare-infinitive (as in 'let him go') while not bare infinitive + objective pronoun + to-infinitive (as in 'want you to stay'). Now could you give me again just a reference or link indicating only such construction instead of the one with let, in reference to imperative? Then I will accept and apologize . This applies to Turkish too. You can never see (ona) gitmesini söyle or söyle ona gitsin, either of which is a possible translation of tell him to go, as grammatical pattern in turkish grammer, for Turkish already has gitsin.

Imagine, you study Turkish and I English, and we encounter something like this:

Imperative: In Turkish imperative construction is as follows:

ona gitmesini söyle
onlara gitmelerini söyle
etc.

and in English:

tell him to go
tell them to go
etc.


This is what I intended to refer to.

33.       natiypuspi
435 posts
 19 Feb 2007 Mon 05:38 pm

AllTooHuman, I think that the problem is that it is impossible giving an exactly translation when gramatical structures are so different like english and turkish. Of course I see your point. Many times, when I try to translate "olsun" into english, I say "that it becomes", because it's another option in my mother language, spanish.

34.       SunFlowerSeed
841 posts
 20 Feb 2007 Tue 10:13 am

Selamlar,

Yukarıdaki gereksiz tartışmaya katılmak istemiyorum açıkçası ancak istek kipi ile emir kipi arasında bir tercüme sorunu var gibi.

Her ne kadar gramer olarak farklı olsalar da istek ve emir kipleri Türkçe'de içiçe girmiş durumdadırlar.Konuşma stiline göre anlamları değişmektedir. O yüzden sadece fiilleri kullanıp direk tercüme etmeye kalkarsak sonuçsuz kalabiliriz.

Örnek: Gideyim >> Let me go veya I shall go.
Cümleye göre herhangi biri olabilir.

Geç oldu, ben gideyim artık. >> It's late now, I'd better go/I shall go. (I want to leave now)
Yol verin gideyim. >> Let me go. (Open up a passage so I can pass.)
Hangi doktora gideyim? >> Which doctor shall I go?
İnim inim inleyesin.>>I wish you suffer a lot.
/* Dahası: http://www.kahramanmaras.org/forum/showthread.php?t=3681&page=2 */
hoş-gele, sefa gideler >> They shall come in peace and leave happy.
Paris'e gidelim >> Let us go to Paris.
Burda varken neden başka yere gidesiniz? >> While I have it here why do you want to go to another place?


İngiliz gramerinde benim bildiğim kadarıyla sabit bir istek/emir kipi yok. Ancak isteğimizi veya emrimizi değişik şekillerde bildirebiliyoruz. O yüzden sadece Let veya Shall diyerek işin içinden çıkamıyoruz.

Bırak beni hürriyetime kavuşayım.
kavuşayım: istek (yapılmasını kendi adıma 2. kişiden isteyen ben'im)
bırak : istek (yapılmasını 2. kişiden isteyen ben'im; burada bir emir söz konusu değil)
>>Let me have my freedom.

Bırak çocuğu hürriyetine kavuşsun.
kavuşsun : istek (yapılmasını 3. kişi adına 2.kişiden isteyen ben'im)
bırak : emir (yapılmasını 2. kişiden isteyen ben'im)
>>(You!) Let him to have his freedom.

Derhal benim yanıma gelsin.
gelsin : emir (yapılmasını 3. kişi için 2. kişiden isteyen ben'im)
>>Tell him to come here immediately.

Benim çayım açık olsun.
olsun : istek (yapılmasını 3. şey ile ilgili olarak 2. kişiden isteyen ben'im)
>>My tea shall be light(in color). (I want a light(in color) tea.)

Aynı ek, hem emir, hem istek, hem gereklilik vs. bildirebilmektedir. Bunların farklı fonksiyonlar ifade edebilmesi, ancak; cümledeki diğer kelimelere kişiler arasındaki hissî ve hiyerarşik ilişkilere vurgu ve tonlamaya
isteğin gerçekleşmesi için gereken zamana isteğin derecesine
isteğin gerçekleşmesi için müsamaha ve mecburiyete, göre değişmektedir
http://turkoloji.cu.edu.tr/ESKI%20TURK%20DILI/gulsevin_01.pdf

Umarım açıklık getireyim derken daha da karıştırmamışımdır.

Herkese sevgi ve saygılar,

Git fiilinin tüm halleri için:
http://www.verbix.com/cache/webverbix/31/gitmek.shtml

35.       metehan2001
501 posts
 20 Feb 2007 Tue 11:49 pm

SunFlowerSeed, verdiğiniz faydalı ve aydınlatıcı bilgiler için çok teşekkür ediyorum.

36.       bod
5999 posts
 21 Feb 2007 Wed 10:19 am

Quoting juliacernat:

first, you cannot find in the dictionary such forms of the verbs; tenses and verbal forms are not there, you just have to learn the mechanism of their forming



WinMekMak is an invaluable tool for this.....

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