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what caught my eye today
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40.       AEnigma III
0 posts
 19 Feb 2008 Tue 07:51 pm

Quoting Daydreamer:

Come on! You can't leave me in the middle of an argument for a whole week ya! What if Daydreamer the Nice will renew her Dead Poets' Society membership?



Awwwww dont make me argue NOW I had a busy day!!

41.       Daydreamer
3743 posts
 19 Feb 2008 Tue 07:52 pm

Tamam, having a busy day is an excuse. I'll let you regroup your troops and get back to this topic when you're in the mood

42.       AEnigma III
0 posts
 19 Feb 2008 Tue 07:54 pm

Quoting Daydreamer:

Tamam, having a busy day is an excuse. I'll let you regroup your troops and get back to this topic when you're in the mood



Hehehehehehe lol (and maybe check a few of my facts before posting hehehe! )

43.       lalisia
0 posts
 19 Feb 2008 Tue 07:54 pm

Quoting Daydreamer:


I wish we never brought down communism. It must have been a perfect system but the stupid Yugoslavians and other just couldn't take it...



You may joke on it, but maybe we are really stupid, because in that time, we had a best times of our lives!..and who tells else is telling the lies!

44.       Daydreamer
3743 posts
 19 Feb 2008 Tue 08:08 pm

Oh yes, apart from the absolutely free education and health system, we had camps in NRD, Bulgaria and Artek (to all those NOT from the Soviet Block, Artek was an international scout camp in USSR). I remember my mom buying me dairy products and baby shoes using a Child's Book of Medical Health, all children wearing the same clothes, standing 3 days in a queue to buy a colour TV or Cuban oranges before Christmas. Yes, those were the days. My father was almost expelled from a Technical University for not wanting to become a Party member (I'm not sure what's it like in English but the Party is Polish United Labour Party - the only one there was). We didn't have to worry about elections - everything was known beforehand and the support for the Party was always 99%...great times...

Maybe it was different in Croatia, but Poland is much better now than before. Sure, the transformation period was and still is tough, but we're getting better and better and I am sure it'll be the same in Croatia, just give it some time

45.       lalisia
0 posts
 19 Feb 2008 Tue 08:36 pm

Quoting Daydreamer:

Oh yes, apart from the absolutely free education and health system, we had camps in NRD, Bulgaria and Artek (to all those NOT from the Soviet Block, Artek was an international scout camp in USSR). I remember my mom buying me dairy products and baby shoes using a Child's Book of Medical Health, all children wearing the same clothes, standing 3 days in a queue to buy a colour TV or Cuban oranges before Christmas. Yes, those were the days. My father was almost expelled from a Technical University for not wanting to become a Party member (I'm not sure what's it like in English but the Party is Polish United Labour Party - the only one there was). We didn't have to worry about elections - everything was known beforehand and the support for the Party was always 99%...great times...

Maybe it was different in Croatia, but Poland is much better now than before. Sure, the transformation period was and still is tough, but we're getting better and better and I am sure it'll be the same in Croatia, just give it some time



Sure it was different in Croatia! I remember when my parents built a house, bought a car..like a very young couple, remember my mom buying me everything I wished,we went to trip every summer, every winter...
Now young couples living in rent apartments, but their earnings(if they have a job) are barely covering rents! And what about overhead expenses, food, clothes...?
Now they have to decide will they buy some food for their children or some clothes...no need to list other.
I am happy now for finding a good job..but big number of my family and friends are not! And if this is transformation period, it last to long, all one generation is living trough it..I only hope my children are not gonna be ones to fell it too.

46.       Daydreamer
3743 posts
 19 Feb 2008 Tue 08:41 pm

So, don't you think that if it hadn't been for years of ruining your country's economy by the communists, you might be living like your Italian or Greek neighbours? The thing is, communist countries (except for China which has a free market) don't let their economy develop. It seemed better then, but it wouldn't last forever. I'm sure you experienced inflation etc...

47.       thehandsom
7403 posts
 19 Feb 2008 Tue 10:56 pm

As I promised to daydreamer

Jean-Paul Sartre, about Che Guevara "the most complete human being of our age".

I first saw his picture whan I was 15 (I think).

(it was with the red background)
And There was a turkish writing underneath something like 'let the death come where ever it comes from .....then we will welcome to death'.
The first thing I remember thinking of him was 'wow what a heroic looking guy'
Later on, when I learnt more about him, there was no doubt in my mind:'He was going to be one my heros'.
And he is a hero to me. Most romantic one of all my heros.
Daydream, you have no idea what you are talking about him.
You just read something about him and that is all..
You should read more about a subject before jumping into ignorant-primitive conclusions..

Anyway
Some passages from 'gergous' George galloway about him:


Ernesto “Che” Guevara Lynch, who was murdered by United States agents under orders from Washington 40 years ago, is the face of global rebellion.

He inspires all the more intensely since he could have lived a prosperous bourgeois life as an Argentine dentist. Instead, and despite asthma, he chose a life of action, a motorcycle diarist, a comandante in a triumphant Cuban revolutionary army, a guerrilla leader in the Congo, a martyr in the mountain gulleys of Bolivia.

By the time Che Guevara met Fidel Castro a year later he was a rebel. After, he was a revolutionary. Guevara had absolutely no military background and signed on with Fidel as the rebel “army’s” doctor. In the mountains of eastern Cuba in the late 1950s he became a military leader and a strategist of revolutionary warfare of the first order. It was an old-fashioned ethos: lead your men (and women) from the front and don’t ask them to do anything you aren’t prepared to do with them.

Those who would traduce Che, Fidel and the Cuban revolutionaries must say what Cuba would be like now if that dictatorship had held on – Haiti, the most hellish place in the Western hemisphere is literally not far from Cuba, but metaphorically in a different universe.

Che, in particular, defies the right-wing stereotype of the ice-cold, cunning revolutionist. He said that ‘the true revolutionary is guided by a great feeling of love. It is impossible to think of a genuine revolutionary lacking this quality.’

Even as Cuba, in the grip of the US’s embargo, looked to the Soviet Union for support, Che was prepared to criticise the bureaucratism he saw in Moscow.

Instead of settling down in Havana, he set out to spread revolution in Congo, where the great Patrice Lumumba had been murdered in a UN-supported coup. Nelson Mandela paid tribute to the Cuban role in Africa’s liberation struggle. ‘On his release from prison he went to Cuba, rather than any other capital in the world, beneath an illumination of Che’s image, Mandela lifted his hands aloft and said: ‘See how far we slaves have come!’‘

Even the coldest of latter-day Cold Warriors must have been moved by the recent story that a Cuban medical team last year saved the sight of Mario Teran, the Bolivian sergeant who executed Che.

Which leaves the liberals, who say that they too, as Che put it, ‘. . . tremble with indignation at every injustice,’

She said she had been there when Guevara had died. She said she was 19 at the time. Then she cast a look around her and said, ‘Look at us. Nothing has changed since then. El Commandante came too soon. We were ignorant and did not understand him… We abandoned him… and here we are just as we were before he came, or maybe even worse.’ “


george galloway about che

And some quotes from Che:

If you tremble indignation at every injustice then you are a comrade of mine.

At the risk of sounding ridiculous, let me say that the true revolutionary is guided by feelings of love.

I am not a liberator. Liberators do not exist. The people liberate themselves.

It is not a matter of wishing success to the victim of aggression, but of sharing his fate; one must accompany him to his death or to victory.

Many will call me an adventurer - and that I am, only one of a different sort: one of those who risks his skin to prove his platitudes.

There is no other definition of socialism valid for us than that of the abolition of the exploitation of man by man.

I would rather die standing up, then live life on my knees.
(And That is what he said before he died)
I know you are here to kill me. Shoot, coward, you are only going to kill a man.

Daydreams?
is any of your heros can die the way he died?
Well mine did!!

48.       AEnigma III
0 posts
 19 Feb 2008 Tue 10:58 pm

Quoting thehandsom:



I have to confess to having a bit of "a thing" about Che. I also have to admit he was damn sexy! lol

(Sorry Adonis )

49.       AEnigma III
0 posts
 19 Feb 2008 Tue 11:04 pm

Quoting thehandsom:

As I promised to daydreamer
About El comandate:
Jean-Paul Sartre, about Che Guevara "the most complete human being of our age".

I first saw his picture whan I was 15 (I think).

(it was with the red background)
And There was a turkish writing underneath something like 'let the death come where ever it comes from .....then we will welcome to death'.
The first thing I remember thinking of him was 'wow what a heroic looking guy'
Later on, when I learnt more about him, there was no doubt in my mind:'He was going to be one my heros'.
And he is a hero to me. Most romantic one of all my heros.
Daydream, you have no idea what you are talking about him.
You just read something about him and that is all..
You should read more about a subject before jumping into ignorant-primitive conclusions..

Anyway
Some passages from 'gergous' George galloway about him:


Ernesto “Che” Guevara Lynch, who was murdered by United States agents under orders from Washington 40 years ago, is the face of global rebellion.

He inspires all the more intensely since he could have lived a prosperous bourgeois life as an Argentine dentist. Instead, and despite asthma, he chose a life of action, a motorcycle diarist, a comandante in a triumphant Cuban revolutionary army, a guerrilla leader in the Congo, a martyr in the mountain gulleys of Bolivia.

By the time Che Guevara met Fidel Castro a year later he was a rebel. After, he was a revolutionary. Guevara had absolutely no military background and signed on with Fidel as the rebel “army’s” doctor. In the mountains of eastern Cuba in the late 1950s he became a military leader and a strategist of revolutionary warfare of the first order. It was an old-fashioned ethos: lead your men (and women) from the front and don’t ask them to do anything you aren’t prepared to do with them.

Those who would traduce Che, Fidel and the Cuban revolutionaries must say what Cuba would be like now if that dictatorship had held on – Haiti, the most hellish place in the Western hemisphere is literally not far from Cuba, but metaphorically in a different universe.

Che, in particular, defies the right-wing stereotype of the ice-cold, cunning revolutionist. He said that ‘the true revolutionary is guided by a great feeling of love. It is impossible to think of a genuine revolutionary lacking this quality.’

Even as Cuba, in the grip of the US’s embargo, looked to the Soviet Union for support, Che was prepared to criticise the bureaucratism he saw in Moscow.

Instead of settling down in Havana, he set out to spread revolution in Congo, where the great Patrice Lumumba had been murdered in a UN-supported coup. Nelson Mandela paid tribute to the Cuban role in Africa’s liberation struggle. ‘On his release from prison he went to Cuba, rather than any other capital in the world, beneath an illumination of Che’s image, Mandela lifted his hands aloft and said: ‘See how far we slaves have come!’‘

Even the coldest of latter-day Cold Warriors must have been moved by the recent story that a Cuban medical team last year saved the sight of Mario Teran, the Bolivian sergeant who executed Che.

Which leaves the liberals, who say that they too, as Che put it, ‘. . . tremble with indignation at every injustice,’

She said she had been there when Guevara had died. She said she was 19 at the time. Then she cast a look around her and said, ‘Look at us. Nothing has changed since then. El Commandante came too soon. We were ignorant and did not understand him… We abandoned him… and here we are just as we were before he came, or maybe even worse.’ “


george galloway about che

And some quotes from Che:

If you tremble indignation at every injustice then you are a comrade of mine.

At the risk of sounding ridiculous, let me say that the true revolutionary is guided by feelings of love.

I am not a liberator. Liberators do not exist. The people liberate themselves.

It is not a matter of wishing success to the victim of aggression, but of sharing his fate; one must accompany him to his death or to victory.

Many will call me an adventurer - and that I am, only one of a different sort: one of those who risks his skin to prove his platitudes.

There is no other definition of socialism valid for us than that of the abolition of the exploitation of man by man.

I would rather die standing up, then live life on my knees.
(And That is what he said before he died)
I know you are here to kill me. Shoot, coward, you are only going to kill a man.

Daydreams?
is any of your heros can die the way he died?
Well mine did!!



Sorry, I covered this wonderful post, so re-posted Would recommend anyone interested to watch The Motorcycle Diaries - beautiful film.

50.       lalisia
0 posts
 19 Feb 2008 Tue 11:10 pm

Quoting Daydreamer:

So, don't you think that if it hadn't been for years of ruining your country's economy by the communists, you might be living like your Italian or Greek neighbours? The thing is, communist countries (except for China which has a free market) don't let their economy develop. It seemed better then, but it wouldn't last forever. I'm sure you experienced inflation etc...


Sure it was inflation, we are not in paradise, but it lasted less than this transformation period. Anyway...sometimes I'm a bit nostalgic.And about now what ever we call it, hope it's gonna pass soon.

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